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By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
Leaders of a violent East Baltimore drug ring that authorities say was responsible for five city killings, including a brazen shooting at a "Rest in Peace" party thrown to remember a rival gang member, avoided a lengthy federal trial set to begin yesterday with guilty pleas expected to bring sentences of 30 years or more. The "Hot Boys" gang leaders had faced narcotics and weapons charges in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Prosecutors decided last year that they would not pursue death sentences, but in some instances the defendants could have been sentenced to life in prison.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Anthony "Stink" Joyner, who was fatally shot over the weekend in East Baltimore, had been released from federal prison last year after serving 10 years for his role in a drug gang tied to five murders including a 2001 Memorial Day block party shooting.  Police have not released a motive in the shooting of Joyner, who was shot in the head Sunday evening in the 200 block of Beale Ct. in the Douglass Homes housing project. He was killed the day he turned 34.  Court records and news articles show Joyner had been charged in 2002 along with 11 members of the "Hot Boys," an East Baltimore group who "gained respect and intimidated drug trade competitors by gunning down rivals," including the machine-gun killing in November 2000 of rival gang member Keith "Bones" Hamlet.  Prosecutors alleged that the group was responsible for the Memorial Day 2001 mass shooting at a block party that killed Lakeisha Moten, 24, who was the girlfriend of one of the leaders of the rival "North Avenue/Harford Road Boys" gang.  The block party shooting was one of the highest profile crimes at the time, with 11 people wounded in addition to Moten.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
Eight months after a deadly gang rivalry erupted in gunfire at a crowded East Baltimore block party, federal authorities said yesterday that 12 men have been charged with running the violent, well-armed drug gang responsible for five city murders, including the Memorial Day shooting that killed one woman. The federal indictment charging members of the East Baltimore gang known as the "Hot Boys" with various narcotics and weapons offenses gave a grim accounting of how members gained respect and intimidated drug trade competitors by gunning down rivals, including the machine-gun killing Nov. 11, 2000, of rival gang member Keith "Bones" Hamlet.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | June 12, 2008
Where was he? After 30 minutes stretched to an hour and then another 45 minutes, it seemed that Lil' Wayne, the acclaimed New Orleans rapper, was going to be a no-show. He was the headliner Wednesday night at 1st Mariner Arena, and it was also the same day his long-awaited album, the pop-driven Tha Carter III, hit stores. Maybe he was out celebrating the CD release with his homeboys and forgot there was an enthusiastic crowd, some of whom had paid as much as $200 a ticket, waiting to see him perform.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
Of the various city homicides attributed by federal authorities to the violent East Baltimore gang known as the Hot Boys, the death of Darrin "D-Nice" Griffin on Sept. 16, 2000, was among the least noticed. A friend of some of the gang's leaders, Griffin was shot to death in a wooded area off Clifton Road because they believed he had stolen drugs and money from a stash house they controlled. To Griffin's mother, who helped raise and often cooked meals for some of the young men eventually implicated in her son's death, it was a loss that crystallized the senselessness of Baltimore's violent street culture, in which victims frequently know their killers well and the smallest slights can prove deadly.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2001
The shooting of 12 people outside a party in East Baltimore last week likely resulted from a gang war that has been brewing for months, according to court records made public yesterday. Agents with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration spell out a lengthy feud between the "Hot Boys" and the "North Avenue/Harford Road Boys" and possible reasons for the May 28 shooting in an eight-page affidavit. Police are still hunting for witnesses to the shooting, which took place as about 60 people were gathered outside 2032 E. North Ave. to remember Keith E. "Bone" Hamlet, a member of one of the gangs who was shot to death late last year at the house.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
Baltimore police have arrested a 25-year-old man sought for questioning in the shootings of 12 people attending a party in East Baltimore on Memorial Day, police said yesterday. Officers with the warrant apprehension task force arrested Dietrich Fortune on federal drug distribution charges in the 1100 block of E. Fayette St. about 10:30 p.m. Tuesday, police said. Maj. Russell N. Shea Jr., who heads the task force, said police were watching the area because Fortune, who lives in the 2500 block of Boyd St., was known to hang out there.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2003
An alleged member of East Baltimore's violent Hot Boys gang cursed at a federal prosecutor after a testy courtroom exchange yesterday in a case that holds the group responsible for five city killings, including a brazen block party shooting that killed the girlfriend of a rival gang leader. Kevin "Manny" Glenn muttered an expletive at Assistant U.S. Attorney John F. Purcell as he walked past the lawyer after facing brief but heated questioning on the witness stand during a pretrial evidence hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
A federal jury acquitted an East Baltimore man yesterday in connection with a 2001 revenge shooting, one of dozens blamed on a violent city drug ring that authorities say was responsible for five homicides, including the shooting of one young woman at a "Rest in Peace" party thrown to remember a rival gang member. Elijah Richardson, 24, was one of 12 men charged in U.S. District Court in Baltimore with narcotics and weapons counts related to their alleged roles with the so-called Hot Boys gang.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Gail Gibson and Del Quentin Wilber and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
Baltimore prosecutors dropped murder charges yesterday against a 20-year-old man accused of shooting to death a member of an East Baltimore gang - a killing that police said led to the shooting of 12 people attending a party in May. Prosecutors declined to say why they dropped the murder case against Tavon D. Dixon of the 900 block of N. Collington Ave., who was charged with killing Keith E. "Bone" Hamlet on Nov. 11. But police said yesterday that they...
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
Federal and local authorities announced yesterday that they have dismantled a well-armed East Baltimore street gang, and will prosecute in federal court the men accused of waging war with other city drug distributors and terrorizing neighborhoods throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s. Maryland U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio, in a joint news conference yesterday with Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark and State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy, promised to bring the full force of federal law down on seven members of the North Avenue Boys, whose indictments were unsealed this week.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
Of the various city homicides attributed by federal authorities to the violent East Baltimore gang known as the Hot Boys, the death of Darrin "D-Nice" Griffin on Sept. 16, 2000, was among the least noticed. A friend of some of the gang's leaders, Griffin was shot to death in a wooded area off Clifton Road because they believed he had stolen drugs and money from a stash house they controlled. To Griffin's mother, who helped raise and often cooked meals for some of the young men eventually implicated in her son's death, it was a loss that crystallized the senselessness of Baltimore's violent street culture, in which victims frequently know their killers well and the smallest slights can prove deadly.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2003
As he handed down a 35-year prison term to the leader of a violent East Baltimore gang yesterday, U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz made a blunt appeal for residents to reclaim the city's most lawless neighborhoods and compared the effort in ways to the U.S.-led war in Iraq. In wide-ranging remarks from the bench, Motz said the burden of fighting violence and drugs in Baltimore must be shared by officials in positions of power as well as residents of the city's affluent suburbs and people who live on the city's drug-infested and violence-ridden streets.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
A federal jury acquitted an East Baltimore man yesterday in connection with a 2001 revenge shooting, one of dozens blamed on a violent city drug ring that authorities say was responsible for five homicides, including the shooting of one young woman at a "Rest in Peace" party thrown to remember a rival gang member. Elijah Richardson, 24, was one of 12 men charged in U.S. District Court in Baltimore with narcotics and weapons counts related to their alleged roles with the so-called Hot Boys gang.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
Leaders of a violent East Baltimore drug ring that authorities say was responsible for five city killings, including a brazen shooting at a "Rest in Peace" party thrown to remember a rival gang member, avoided a lengthy federal trial set to begin yesterday with guilty pleas expected to bring sentences of 30 years or more. The "Hot Boys" gang leaders had faced narcotics and weapons charges in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Prosecutors decided last year that they would not pursue death sentences, but in some instances the defendants could have been sentenced to life in prison.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2003
An alleged member of East Baltimore's violent Hot Boys gang cursed at a federal prosecutor after a testy courtroom exchange yesterday in a case that holds the group responsible for five city killings, including a brazen block party shooting that killed the girlfriend of a rival gang leader. Kevin "Manny" Glenn muttered an expletive at Assistant U.S. Attorney John F. Purcell as he walked past the lawyer after facing brief but heated questioning on the witness stand during a pretrial evidence hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | June 12, 2008
Where was he? After 30 minutes stretched to an hour and then another 45 minutes, it seemed that Lil' Wayne, the acclaimed New Orleans rapper, was going to be a no-show. He was the headliner Wednesday night at 1st Mariner Arena, and it was also the same day his long-awaited album, the pop-driven Tha Carter III, hit stores. Maybe he was out celebrating the CD release with his homeboys and forgot there was an enthusiastic crowd, some of whom had paid as much as $200 a ticket, waiting to see him perform.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
Federal and local authorities announced yesterday that they have dismantled a well-armed East Baltimore street gang, and will prosecute in federal court the men accused of waging war with other city drug distributors and terrorizing neighborhoods throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s. Maryland U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio, in a joint news conference yesterday with Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark and State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy, promised to bring the full force of federal law down on seven members of the North Avenue Boys, whose indictments were unsealed this week.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
Eight months after a deadly gang rivalry erupted in gunfire at a crowded East Baltimore block party, federal authorities said yesterday that 12 men have been charged with running the violent, well-armed drug gang responsible for five city murders, including the Memorial Day shooting that killed one woman. The federal indictment charging members of the East Baltimore gang known as the "Hot Boys" with various narcotics and weapons offenses gave a grim accounting of how members gained respect and intimidated drug trade competitors by gunning down rivals, including the machine-gun killing Nov. 11, 2000, of rival gang member Keith "Bones" Hamlet.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Gail Gibson and Del Quentin Wilber and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
Baltimore prosecutors dropped murder charges yesterday against a 20-year-old man accused of shooting to death a member of an East Baltimore gang - a killing that police said led to the shooting of 12 people attending a party in May. Prosecutors declined to say why they dropped the murder case against Tavon D. Dixon of the 900 block of N. Collington Ave., who was charged with killing Keith E. "Bone" Hamlet on Nov. 11. But police said yesterday that they...
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