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Hostile Environment

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NEWS
By Kenneth Lasson | February 11, 1996
In recent years there has been a noticeable upsurge in allegations of sexual harassment on campus, due in part ot the large number of colleges and universities (many of them public) that have imposed sweeping speech and language codes -- which in turn reflect exceedingly broad interpretations of what the law now calls a "hostile environment."At Pennsylvania State University, for example, an English instructor claimed she was being sexually harassed by the presence of Goya's famous painting "Naked Maja" in a university lecture hall.
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SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
Brett Oberholtzer wasn't a household name entering Wednesday night's game between the Orioles and Houston Astros, with only three major league appearances and a 7.36 ERA. But in his first major league start at Camden Yards in front of a small cheering contingent, the Christiana, Del., native pitched like an ace. The 24-year-old lefty threw seven shutout innings, scattering three hits, walking none and striking out six. He faced 24 Orioles batters,...
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 10, 1998
BOSTON -- It's been a week since Judge Susan Webber Wright saved us from finding out whether or not the president of the United States has distinguishing characteristics on his genitals.For this rescue operation, and for spoiling all the fun, the Arkansas judge has been vilified as a traitor to her gender. She has been accused of making the workplace safe for sexual harassers everywhere and bringing glee to the hearts of bosses who will soon be fearlessly dropping trousers -- at least once per employee -- in the corner office.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 6, 2010
It's time for the Ravens to introduce the Miami Dolphins to a term that they probably haven't heard this year. Road kill. The Dolphins seem to have found a comfort zone on the road, as evidenced by their 4-0 record away from home and their inexplicable inability to register a victory at Dolphins Stadium. It's a highly unusual dichotomy which needs to be corrected on Sunday at M&T Bank Stadium. The oddsmakers obviously aren't impressed. They've installed the Ravens as a 5 1/2-point favorite to come off their bye week and show the Dolphins what it's like to play in a truly hostile environment — and I'm not just talking about the decibel level on the field.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
Brett Oberholtzer wasn't a household name entering Wednesday night's game between the Orioles and Houston Astros, with only three major league appearances and a 7.36 ERA. But in his first major league start at Camden Yards in front of a small cheering contingent, the Christiana, Del., native pitched like an ace. The 24-year-old lefty threw seven shutout innings, scattering three hits, walking none and striking out six. He faced 24 Orioles batters,...
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 25, 1997
BOSTON -- Let's take this once again from the top. Maestro, if you please.Some weeks ago, in a column on the Paula Jones suit, I added one little musical phrase suggesting that even Ms. Jones' version of her encounter with then-Governor Clinton did not rise to the legal level of sexual harassment.This struck a dissonant chord with an entire glee club of readers, including some who said they were usually in harmony with my views. They responded by all available mails -- electronic, voice and snail -- but they were generally playing one note.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 6, 2010
It's time for the Ravens to introduce the Miami Dolphins to a term that they probably haven't heard this year. Road kill. The Dolphins seem to have found a comfort zone on the road, as evidenced by their 4-0 record away from home and their inexplicable inability to register a victory at Dolphins Stadium. It's a highly unusual dichotomy which needs to be corrected on Sunday at M&T Bank Stadium. The oddsmakers obviously aren't impressed. They've installed the Ravens as a 5 1/2-point favorite to come off their bye week and show the Dolphins what it's like to play in a truly hostile environment — and I'm not just talking about the decibel level on the field.
NEWS
November 19, 1996
WHEN A 19-year-old unwed mother aims a pistol at her abdomen to end a six-month pregnancy, society is clearly witnessing an act of tragic desperation. Kawana Ashley, the St. Petersburg, Fla., woman who was charged with murder and manslaughter when her daughter lived only 15 days after an emergency delivery, feared that her grandmother, who had custody of her 3-year-old son, would not accept another child. Ms. Ashley had just lost her job, and could not afford the $1,350 she needed for an abortion.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 2, 1998
BENICIA, Calif. -- The American workplace is not just getting leaner.It's getting meaner.Attila-the-Hun bosses who yell or browbeat. Back-stabbing co-workers who spread malicious rumors or give you the silent treatment.This behavior has been called everything from workplace incivility to psychological aggression. Lawyers call it a hostile work environment.But the experts who study it have another term for the trend: workplace bullying.From the schoolyard to the workplace, bullying is loosely defined as repeated aggressive behavior that deliberately causes physical or psychological torment.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
Two women who work for a State Farm insurance agent in Randallstown sued him and his corporate employer Tuesday, saying he repeatedly subjected them to sexual harassment, vile insults and a hostile work environment. Kristi Mitchell and Veronica Cobb are seeking at least $4 million in punitive damages from the agent, Obie Sorrell, and State Farm Annuity and Life Insurance Co., a Fortune 500 company based in Bloomington, Ill., that has 17,000 agents and 68,000 employees. Mitchell has been an office manager for State Farm since February 2002, and Cobb was hired in May as a customer-service manager.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
Two women who work for a State Farm insurance agent in Randallstown sued him and his corporate employer Tuesday, saying he repeatedly subjected them to sexual harassment, vile insults and a hostile work environment. Kristi Mitchell and Veronica Cobb are seeking at least $4 million in punitive damages from the agent, Obie Sorrell, and State Farm Annuity and Life Insurance Co., a Fortune 500 company based in Bloomington, Ill., that has 17,000 agents and 68,000 employees. Mitchell has been an office manager for State Farm since February 2002, and Cobb was hired in May as a customer-service manager.
NEWS
By Chris Burritt and Chris Burritt,Cox News Service | February 10, 2000
HARKERS ISLAND, N.C. -- As soon as the winds calm down, a barge will churn across the gray waters to Shackleford Banks, a remote island where a controversial cargo awaits a trip to civilization. For one recent week, 14 of the island's herd of 130 wild horses have been corralled in a large wire pen. Gale-force winds halted their departure from the rugged spit of sand at the southernmost tip of North Carolina's Outer Banks. But eventually a barge transported them to Harkers Island, where, for $600 apiece, they were sold to private owners lining up for a shaggy piece of North Carolina history.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 2, 1998
BENICIA, Calif. -- The American workplace is not just getting leaner.It's getting meaner.Attila-the-Hun bosses who yell or browbeat. Back-stabbing co-workers who spread malicious rumors or give you the silent treatment.This behavior has been called everything from workplace incivility to psychological aggression. Lawyers call it a hostile work environment.But the experts who study it have another term for the trend: workplace bullying.From the schoolyard to the workplace, bullying is loosely defined as repeated aggressive behavior that deliberately causes physical or psychological torment.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 10, 1998
BOSTON -- It's been a week since Judge Susan Webber Wright saved us from finding out whether or not the president of the United States has distinguishing characteristics on his genitals.For this rescue operation, and for spoiling all the fun, the Arkansas judge has been vilified as a traitor to her gender. She has been accused of making the workplace safe for sexual harassers everywhere and bringing glee to the hearts of bosses who will soon be fearlessly dropping trousers -- at least once per employee -- in the corner office.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 25, 1997
BOSTON -- Let's take this once again from the top. Maestro, if you please.Some weeks ago, in a column on the Paula Jones suit, I added one little musical phrase suggesting that even Ms. Jones' version of her encounter with then-Governor Clinton did not rise to the legal level of sexual harassment.This struck a dissonant chord with an entire glee club of readers, including some who said they were usually in harmony with my views. They responded by all available mails -- electronic, voice and snail -- but they were generally playing one note.
NEWS
November 19, 1996
WHEN A 19-year-old unwed mother aims a pistol at her abdomen to end a six-month pregnancy, society is clearly witnessing an act of tragic desperation. Kawana Ashley, the St. Petersburg, Fla., woman who was charged with murder and manslaughter when her daughter lived only 15 days after an emergency delivery, feared that her grandmother, who had custody of her 3-year-old son, would not accept another child. Ms. Ashley had just lost her job, and could not afford the $1,350 she needed for an abortion.
NEWS
By Chris Burritt and Chris Burritt,Cox News Service | February 10, 2000
HARKERS ISLAND, N.C. -- As soon as the winds calm down, a barge will churn across the gray waters to Shackleford Banks, a remote island where a controversial cargo awaits a trip to civilization. For one recent week, 14 of the island's herd of 130 wild horses have been corralled in a large wire pen. Gale-force winds halted their departure from the rugged spit of sand at the southernmost tip of North Carolina's Outer Banks. But eventually a barge transported them to Harkers Island, where, for $600 apiece, they were sold to private owners lining up for a shaggy piece of North Carolina history.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 4, 1991
And the Prize for Inanity to the guy who thought up the 29-cent stamp!The Linowes plan is in peril of friendly fire in a hostile environment.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lasson | February 11, 1996
In recent years there has been a noticeable upsurge in allegations of sexual harassment on campus, due in part ot the large number of colleges and universities (many of them public) that have imposed sweeping speech and language codes -- which in turn reflect exceedingly broad interpretations of what the law now calls a "hostile environment."At Pennsylvania State University, for example, an English instructor claimed she was being sexually harassed by the presence of Goya's famous painting "Naked Maja" in a university lecture hall.
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