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By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 1997
The current run on hostas isn't quite as frenzied as the 17th-century rage for tulip bulbs, but it's impressive. Hostas are the No. 1-selling perennial in America, according to the National Perennial Plant Association, having passed daylilies four years ago. There are 44 state and regional hosta societies nationwide, with some 3,000 members; the national society, founded in 1968, is located in Minnesota.Hostas are the perfect plant for today's busy gardener; they can live for decades with minimal care and are available in enough varieties to suit nearly any garden.
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By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 24, 2013
A recent post on the Lab Rescue Facebook page broke my heart: a woman wrote that her beloved dog died unexpectedly, and that an autopsy showed that her liver had been completely destroyed. The culprit? Heliotrope, a common flowering plant the woman had on her deck that the dog nibbled on. Most of us know to watch out for pet-toxic plants around Christmas and Easter, but we don't think that what's growing in our yards might be just as dangerous. I took a look at the ASPCA's list of pet-toxic plants this morning, and was really surprised to see that some of the things in my yard are dangerous to the Labragator.
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By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
We weekend gardeners couldn't do without our convenient, one-stop-shop garden centers; but Maryland's less well-known "boutique" nurseries offer their own eco-pleasures.Some are very small, some are quirky, some specialize in one kind of plant. A few don't advertise or even list themselves in the phone book. They rely on word of mouth. All are fun to visit when you have time to linger.These specialty nurseries aren't all-purpose. You won't find mulch and gardening gloves and a faux marble cherub and 20 different kinds of impatiens.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
When Paige Finley, a research specialist at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, moved into her rowhouse in the Medfield neighborhood in 2005, her backyard contained one shrub and her front was bare. But Finley had a vision for what she wanted. "I knew in my head I wanted it to be a little sanctuary," she says. So she set to work. "I made some drawings, and then I just made some spray paint and drew lines where I wanted the flower beds to be, and I started digging.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
When Paige Finley, a research specialist at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, moved into her rowhouse in the Medfield neighborhood in 2005, her backyard contained one shrub and her front was bare. But Finley had a vision for what she wanted. "I knew in my head I wanted it to be a little sanctuary," she says. So she set to work. "I made some drawings, and then I just made some spray paint and drew lines where I wanted the flower beds to be, and I started digging.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 24, 2013
A recent post on the Lab Rescue Facebook page broke my heart: a woman wrote that her beloved dog died unexpectedly, and that an autopsy showed that her liver had been completely destroyed. The culprit? Heliotrope, a common flowering plant the woman had on her deck that the dog nibbled on. Most of us know to watch out for pet-toxic plants around Christmas and Easter, but we don't think that what's growing in our yards might be just as dangerous. I took a look at the ASPCA's list of pet-toxic plants this morning, and was really surprised to see that some of the things in my yard are dangerous to the Labragator.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Melody Simmons and Kris Antonelli and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
A squad of Baltimore County detectives canvassed a jittery Randallstown neighborhood yesterday for clues to the slaying of a retired family studies teacher and grandmother of five, who was found strangled in her bedroom Tuesday.The body of Rosalie Marie Bulkley, 59, was discovered about 8 p.m. by her best friend of 17 years -- a week before the former Franklin High School teacher was to have been honored at a local restaurant for her 26 years as a teacher in the county schools.Yesterday, as Bulkley's colleagues and friends absorbed the news of her death, they described a warm and dedicated woman who had a powerful impact on those around her."
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman | May 15, 1997
It's a tiny garden, squeezed in beside Margaret Wright's home in Roland Park, but oh, what mysteries unfurl there: odd-named plants like lungwort and daphne ... wondrous things that bloom in winter ... frail-looking shrubs with scents 10 times their size.Unusual specimens, all. And not a run-of-the-mill plant in the bunch."I'm always experimenting with different things," says Wright. "My garden is my laboratory and my showroom, too. It's fun to hear friends say, 'Oooh, what's that? And where did you get it?
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | August 7, 2005
I just planted hosta 'Francee.' When all the flowers are gone, do I cut the shoots back and how far? Deadheading your hosta will improve its appearance. Clip off the flower stems near the base of the plant, where the stubs will be hidden by the foliage. Removing stems diverts the plant's energy from seed production. This encourages stronger foliage growth, which is what you want in a plant such as hosta that is grown primarily for its striking foliage. My furniture is being riddled with small holes.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 26, 2002
Years ago, while mowing the lawn for the first time at our first house, I noticed a big clump of furled green leaves coming through the ground near the well cap. I thought it was skunk cabbage -- a native, but not something I wanted -- so I mowed it down. It didn't smell like skunk cabbage, but for several years I mowed it anyway. Then one summer we went away. By the time we got home, the clump had grown lush and leafy and was decorated with lovely trumpet-flowered spikes. Hosta, I realized, not skunk cabbage.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | August 7, 2005
I just planted hosta 'Francee.' When all the flowers are gone, do I cut the shoots back and how far? Deadheading your hosta will improve its appearance. Clip off the flower stems near the base of the plant, where the stubs will be hidden by the foliage. Removing stems diverts the plant's energy from seed production. This encourages stronger foliage growth, which is what you want in a plant such as hosta that is grown primarily for its striking foliage. My furniture is being riddled with small holes.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 26, 2002
Years ago, while mowing the lawn for the first time at our first house, I noticed a big clump of furled green leaves coming through the ground near the well cap. I thought it was skunk cabbage -- a native, but not something I wanted -- so I mowed it down. It didn't smell like skunk cabbage, but for several years I mowed it anyway. Then one summer we went away. By the time we got home, the clump had grown lush and leafy and was decorated with lovely trumpet-flowered spikes. Hosta, I realized, not skunk cabbage.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
We weekend gardeners couldn't do without our convenient, one-stop-shop garden centers; but Maryland's less well-known "boutique" nurseries offer their own eco-pleasures.Some are very small, some are quirky, some specialize in one kind of plant. A few don't advertise or even list themselves in the phone book. They rely on word of mouth. All are fun to visit when you have time to linger.These specialty nurseries aren't all-purpose. You won't find mulch and gardening gloves and a faux marble cherub and 20 different kinds of impatiens.
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 1997
The current run on hostas isn't quite as frenzied as the 17th-century rage for tulip bulbs, but it's impressive. Hostas are the No. 1-selling perennial in America, according to the National Perennial Plant Association, having passed daylilies four years ago. There are 44 state and regional hosta societies nationwide, with some 3,000 members; the national society, founded in 1968, is located in Minnesota.Hostas are the perfect plant for today's busy gardener; they can live for decades with minimal care and are available in enough varieties to suit nearly any garden.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Melody Simmons and Kris Antonelli and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
A squad of Baltimore County detectives canvassed a jittery Randallstown neighborhood yesterday for clues to the slaying of a retired family studies teacher and grandmother of five, who was found strangled in her bedroom Tuesday.The body of Rosalie Marie Bulkley, 59, was discovered about 8 p.m. by her best friend of 17 years -- a week before the former Franklin High School teacher was to have been honored at a local restaurant for her 26 years as a teacher in the county schools.Yesterday, as Bulkley's colleagues and friends absorbed the news of her death, they described a warm and dedicated woman who had a powerful impact on those around her."
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman | May 15, 1997
It's a tiny garden, squeezed in beside Margaret Wright's home in Roland Park, but oh, what mysteries unfurl there: odd-named plants like lungwort and daphne ... wondrous things that bloom in winter ... frail-looking shrubs with scents 10 times their size.Unusual specimens, all. And not a run-of-the-mill plant in the bunch."I'm always experimenting with different things," says Wright. "My garden is my laboratory and my showroom, too. It's fun to hear friends say, 'Oooh, what's that? And where did you get it?
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | June 30, 2007
I love butterflies. I planted a butterfly bush. What do I plant next? Butterfly bushes attract butterflies but cannot sustain a single native species. Surprisingly, to "grow" butterflies, the best plants are oak, willow and black cherry, followed by other native trees and shrubs including birch, maple, pine, walnut, blueberry, sassafras and spicebush. Top perennials are goldenrod, asters, sunflower, joe pye weed, morning glory, sedges and honeysuckle. Every year ragged holes make my hostas an ugly mess, and I hate them.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
Perhaps you've had enough of the merits of same-sex marriage , pejorative ethnic terms , and the Christian tendency toward bigotry . Well, today we're back in business with quibbles over usage, in this case to look at why banning certain words can be useful. Twenty years ago, John S. Carroll, then editor of The Baltimore Sun , had pronounced views about the propriety of language in his newspaper. He disliked references to body parts and bodily functions (It took some persuasion for him to allow the features department to run an article on the Butthole Surfers)
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