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NEWS
February 4, 2010
Mike Gimbel's letter ignores some rudimentary facts regarding medical marijuana ("Md. wouldn't be able to control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 4). Many polls have recently showed that as many as eight out of every 10 Americans say they want medical marijuana to be legalized and regulated. Unlike Mr. Gimbel, they understand that giving needed treatment to sick people needs to take precedence over the politics and misguided taboos of the past. Fourteen states already have medical marijuana, and the reason that many more have legislation pending is because for some severely ill patients, the treatment works.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | November 19, 2009
Baltimore police believe they may have thwarted a killing Wednesday when they tracked down a 17-year-old boy who had been abducted while on his way to school and was being held for ransom in a vacant dwelling in Southwest Baltimore. About 9 a.m., an officer was flagged down by a man who said his son had been abducted. As he was talking to police, he received a call on his cell phone from his son's number, and on the line was a man who demanded cash and two "bricks," a term typically used to describe a large package of drugs.
NEWS
May 31, 2009
Selected comments about Gov. Martin O'Malley's objections to Constellation CEO Mayo A. Shattuck III's compensation package from Jay Hancock's blog, baltimoresun.com/hancock. Our take Call me stupid, but it's difficult to see how Electricite de France's minority stake in a subsidiary of the holding company that owns Baltimore Gas and Electric - and one seat on the holding company's board - gives it "substantial influence" over BGE. Whether or not EDF would obtain substantial influence is the test of whether its deal to invest billions in Constellation Energy's nuclear operation is subject to approval by the Public Service Commission.
NEWS
April 14, 2009
The surprising thing about the deadly cat-and-mouse game between pirates holding an American sea captain hostage and U.S. warships shadowing them off Somalia's coast was that the outcome remained in doubt so long. The drama ended Sunday, when sharpshooters aboard the U.S.S. Bainbridge killed three of the pirates and a fourth surrendered. But even the safe release of Capt. Richard Phillips, whom the whole world was rooting for, couldn't obscure the irony that for three days a handful of ragtag marauders held the world's most powerful navy at bay. The standoff exemplifies the challenge of asymmetrical warfare, a threat the U.S. increasingly is encountering in hot spots around the world.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Julian E. Barnes and Edmund Sanders and Julian E. Barnes,Tribune Newspapers | April 10, 2009
As a freed U.S.-flagged freighter cruised out of Somalia's crime-infested waters Thursday, a tense standoff continued for a second day between a U.S. warship and a tiny lifeboat, adrift with four stranded pirates and the American captain they were holding hostage. A day after the American crew managed to turn the tables on pirates who had seized their cargo ship, the Danish-owned Maersk Alabama headed for safer waters with 18 armed guards from the U.S. destroyer Bainbridge on board. Reports suggested that the cargo ship, which is carrying food and other humanitarian aid for African nations, including food destined for Catholic Relief Services programs in Rwanda, was headed to its original destination of Mombasa, Kenya.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
On a day he described as "not too hot, calm seas," Navy Cmdr. Stephen F. Murphy surveyed the sparkling water ahead of his ship, the guided missile destroyer USS Mahan, as it embarked on aggressive anti-pirate operations launched this week by the U.S. Navy. Murphy, a Catonsville native and Naval Academy graduate, is patrolling the Gulf of Aden, a million square miles of water squeezed between the coast of Somalia and the Arabian Peninsula. Each year 26,000 merchant ships and oil tankers traverse this vital sea lane of global commerce.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,david.kohn@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Two would-be bank robbers held a Prince George's County family hostage overnight, hoping to use the bank employee mother to get to the money, Maryland State Police said. But their plan fell apart yesterday when a state trooper stopped the family car as it headed for the bank. Police said the crime began at 7:30 p.m. Friday. As the 39-year-old mother, a manager of the Sun Trust Bank in Silver Spring, walked into her house in Clinton, she was accosted by two men who had a gun and a knife, police said.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 28, 2008
MUMBAI, India - Security forces assaulted a Jewish center in Mumbai where Muslim militants were believed holed up with possible hostages today, with black-clad commandos dropping from an Indian helicopter as sharpshooters opened fire on the five-story building. The attack came as Indian commandos scoured two luxury hotels room-by-room for survivors and holed-up militants, more than a day after a chain of attacks across India's financial center by suspected Muslim militants left at least 119 people dead.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
R ichard Sher, who announced his departure from WJZ this week after 33 years of reporting and anchoring, says he isn't completely done with the news biz. I'm not sure he was ever completely in it. Among the "many accomplishments" listed on his new Web site, www.richardsher.tv: "talking a suicidal man off a ledge at the University of Maryland Medical Center; negotiating for more than 10 hours with a hostage taker, eventually arranging for the safe release of the man's hostage; and receiving the first civilian lifesaving award ever presented by the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, for helping a man suffering from a heart attack find his way to an emergency room, all the while giving the man nitro glycerin and driving the man's car."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | September 14, 2008
The event came and went in the daily cycle of news of Sept. 4 - man with rifle holds three people hostage in a house off Belair Road, near the Baltimore City-Baltimore County line, leading to a 14-hour standoff with police. This time, the Obviously Troubled Individual (OTI) is 38-year-old Roger Shifflett. He breaks into the house about 4 a.m., allegedly gunning for his estranged girlfriend. The girlfriend flees, leaving three other adults behind. After a few hours, Shifflett releases one of his hostages; the remaining two walk out of the house two hours later.
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