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BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. announced yesterday that it has acquired Hospitality Solutions International Inc.'s hospitality group, a move expected to bring more technology to Micros and help the company reach a broader segment of the hospitality market. "What this does is strengthen [Micros'] technology base from which it offers solutions to the hospitality industry," said Bill Cage, a senior equity analyst at First Union Securities Inc. in Nashville, Tenn. Micros develops such products as software to track restaurant inventory; property management systems for hotels that are used to check guests in and track reservations; and point-of-sale systems, sophisticated electronic cash registers used in restaurants and elsewhere in the industry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
I wondered why I wasn't seeing more restaurants in Baltimore offering Preakness promotions. It's simple, really. They don't have to. Add commencement exercises at Notre Dame and Loyola into the mid-May mix, and you've got a pretty sweet weekend for the hospitality industry. Hotels are booked heavily (but not fully) this weekend, and restaurant reservation books are bulging -- The Preakness is the kind of event where visitors make reservations at the same places year after year. (If you want to rub shoulders with racing insiders after the race, by the way, Aldo's in Little Italy has evolved into the race's unofficial post-race 19th hole, a destination for the visiting media, trainers, jockeys and other insiders.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
I wondered why I wasn't seeing more restaurants in Baltimore offering Preakness promotions. It's simple, really. They don't have to. Add commencement exercises at Notre Dame and Loyola into the mid-May mix, and you've got a pretty sweet weekend for the hospitality industry. Hotels are booked heavily (but not fully) this weekend, and restaurant reservation books are bulging -- The Preakness is the kind of event where visitors make reservations at the same places year after year. (If you want to rub shoulders with racing insiders after the race, by the way, Aldo's in Little Italy has evolved into the race's unofficial post-race 19th hole, a destination for the visiting media, trainers, jockeys and other insiders.)
NEWS
March 25, 2009
Raising alcohol tax would destroy jobs An essential fact missing from the editorial supporting higher alcohol taxes was the destructive domino effect it would have on the state's hospitality industry, destroying jobs among those who can least afford it - waiters, waitresses, busboys and bartenders ("The enablers in Annapolis," March 19). Simply put, alcohol taxes are hospitality taxes that negatively impact restaurants, hotels, bars, liquor stores and the thousands of women and men they employ.
NEWS
June 10, 1994
The Schmoke administration wants to raise the city's hotel occupancy tax to 9 percent from 7 percent to finance its share of the $151 million Baltimore Convention Center expansion. As can be expected, the hospitality industry is up in arms against the proposal, predicting dire consequences for tourism growth if it passes.A hotel tax increase is not likely to be as fatal as the hospitality industry fears. A room tax, after all, is only one among a number of things that determines a city's attractiveness to convention visitors and tourists.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association will focus on attracting small groups and leisure travelers over the next 18 months as the city's hospitality industry copes with a downturn in business travel, BACVA officials said yesterday. The association will work to lure smaller regional, association and corporate meetings within a five- to six-hour driving distance that haven't committed themselves to sites for next year through 2005, BACVA officials said. The efforts will include television advertisements and marketing efforts in other major cities.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
Elected officials and representatives of business and industry will help Anne Arundel Community College launch renovations tomorrow to turn the Robinson Building into the home of the school's Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Tourism Institute. The ceremony will highlight the partnership of the county, the college and the hospitality industry to provide training and services for those sectors of the area's economy. The 14,000-square-foot building, at 7438 Ritchie Highway, was purchased for $2 million in the fall by the county, which had been renting space there.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2000
On Thursday, local officials and restaurateurs will be slurping up raw oysters, sinking their teeth into pastas and sampling fine Italian pastries at the Restaurant Association of Maryland's new Columbia headquarters. Though they moved into the building in June, Thursday is the grand opening of a new center of operations that association officials say will mean more services and education for its members and the public. "Our goal is to turn this facility into the town hall of the hospitality industry," said Marcia S. Harris, association president and CEO. The association chose Columbia because it is easily accessible from all over the state.
NEWS
March 25, 2009
Raising alcohol tax would destroy jobs An essential fact missing from the editorial supporting higher alcohol taxes was the destructive domino effect it would have on the state's hospitality industry, destroying jobs among those who can least afford it - waiters, waitresses, busboys and bartenders ("The enablers in Annapolis," March 19). Simply put, alcohol taxes are hospitality taxes that negatively impact restaurants, hotels, bars, liquor stores and the thousands of women and men they employ.
NEWS
May 3, 1994
It's a sign of how far Baltimore and Washington have to go before they truly are a common market in mind-set:In Northern Virginia, all the talk these days is about the Walt Disney Co.'s plans to build a U.S. history theme park outside Manassas. The billion-dollar project dominated the recent session of Virginia's legislature. Old Dominion's business community is agog over the thousands of jobs the venture will bring. And the topic has drawn in such marquee names as Jacqueline Onassis, Willard Scott and Russell Baker, who belong to an environmental group that is fighting the development sited near lush horse country.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | March 6, 2006
The chefs stood with ladle in hand before steaming pots of gumbo, ready to greet the impending onslaught of hungry visitors. Many had prepared for this event for days, chopping ingredients, shelling shrimp and designing decorations that would give their booths a festive Mardi Gras look. At 1 p.m., the crowds streamed into a hotel banquet hall in Annapolis, marking the beginning of the seventh annual Chefs Signature gumbo competition. "They're all good for different reasons, but what is the truest gumbo?"
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Prodded by a highly critical court ruling, a State Department panel reversed itself and voted unanimously yesterday to allow a South Carolina firm to resume bringing foreign students to the United States to learn the hospitality industry. In a nine-page decision and 44-page recap of its findings in the case, the three-member panel concluded that its earlier decision to bar the American Hospitality Academy's participation in the J-1 exchange program was not supported by the facts. While AHA acknowledged that it had violated program requirements, the panel said many problems had been corrected and described the revocation action as "extreme."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association will focus on attracting small groups and leisure travelers over the next 18 months as the city's hospitality industry copes with a downturn in business travel, BACVA officials said yesterday. The association will work to lure smaller regional, association and corporate meetings within a five- to six-hour driving distance that haven't committed themselves to sites for next year through 2005, BACVA officials said. The efforts will include television advertisements and marketing efforts in other major cities.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
Elected officials and representatives of business and industry will help Anne Arundel Community College launch renovations tomorrow to turn the Robinson Building into the home of the school's Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Tourism Institute. The ceremony will highlight the partnership of the county, the college and the hospitality industry to provide training and services for those sectors of the area's economy. The 14,000-square-foot building, at 7438 Ritchie Highway, was purchased for $2 million in the fall by the county, which had been renting space there.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. announced yesterday that it has acquired Hospitality Solutions International Inc.'s hospitality group, a move expected to bring more technology to Micros and help the company reach a broader segment of the hospitality market. "What this does is strengthen [Micros'] technology base from which it offers solutions to the hospitality industry," said Bill Cage, a senior equity analyst at First Union Securities Inc. in Nashville, Tenn. Micros develops such products as software to track restaurant inventory; property management systems for hotels that are used to check guests in and track reservations; and point-of-sale systems, sophisticated electronic cash registers used in restaurants and elsewhere in the industry.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2000
On Thursday, local officials and restaurateurs will be slurping up raw oysters, sinking their teeth into pastas and sampling fine Italian pastries at the Restaurant Association of Maryland's new Columbia headquarters. Though they moved into the building in June, Thursday is the grand opening of a new center of operations that association officials say will mean more services and education for its members and the public. "Our goal is to turn this facility into the town hall of the hospitality industry," said Marcia S. Harris, association president and CEO. The association chose Columbia because it is easily accessible from all over the state.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 28, 1993
Before this week, Gov. William Donald Schaefer had received eight honorary doctoral degrees, in subjects such as law and humanities.Yesterday he picked up another one, but for both him and the college that bestowed the honor, it was a first.The Baltimore International Culinary College made Mr. Schaefer an honorary doctor of culinary arts and hospitality management, in recognition of his contributions to the "development and growth of the hospitality industry in Maryland" and his long-standing support of the college.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | March 6, 2006
The chefs stood with ladle in hand before steaming pots of gumbo, ready to greet the impending onslaught of hungry visitors. Many had prepared for this event for days, chopping ingredients, shelling shrimp and designing decorations that would give their booths a festive Mardi Gras look. At 1 p.m., the crowds streamed into a hotel banquet hall in Annapolis, marking the beginning of the seventh annual Chefs Signature gumbo competition. "They're all good for different reasons, but what is the truest gumbo?"
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
Dump trucks, cement mixers and cranes have collected east of the Inner Harbor for a second time this year, ready to sprout steel and concrete from a dirt patch and add much-needed hotel rooms downtown.H&S Properties Development Co.'s Courtyard by Marriott, now under construction, will give the city 207 additional hotel rooms. If it is finished on schedule next summer, it will be the first major lodging project completed in Baltimore in a decade.The $20.5 million Courtyard by Marriott also becomes the second of nine planned hotels to begin construction, joining a 750-room convention hotel that H&S Properties -- the real estate arm of baking mogul John Paterakis Sr.'s business empire -- is developing less than a half-mile away.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1999
Eight is enough.Once the name of a television show, it could also be Baltimore's unofficial slogan for new hotels downtown.Within the next three years, real estate developers plan to build eight hotels in the city, projects that would add nearly 3,300 rooms to the city's inventory, a more than 70 percent increase.The new hotels may also have a negative effect on the percentage of occupied rooms. If all the lodging projects are completed and demand stays relatively constant, the percentage would drop by one-quarter.
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