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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | July 19, 2007
The average cost of a Maryland hospital stay rose $500 during the just-ended fiscal year to $9,440 - a 5.4 percent increase that was lower than the national average, according to a report released yesterday by the state's Health Services Cost Review Commission. Throughout the United States, the price tag for such inpatient medical care rose 6.4 percent. Keeping Maryland's increase below the nationwide average has been a goal of the commission, which was established by the Maryland legislature in 1971 amid public concern over rising hospital costs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2014
The dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing recently claimed that "today, nurses are full partners and leaders in the heath care process" ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). But if that's so, why are nurses (primarily a female workforce) still being paid at a flat per diem rate out of their hospital's room and board line item? According to a 2007 article in the Journal of Nursing Administration, during the 1920s nurses presented a separate bill to the patient at discharge that directly competed with the hospital and physician bills.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1999
Negotiators for the Senate and House of Delegates reached agreement yesterday on legislation sought by the governor to give significant new rights to members of HMOs and other managed-care insurance plans.The "patients' bill of rights" is designed to give consumers new flexibility in their health care, with easier access to specialists and a broader choice of medications.The key to the House-Senate agreement is a compromise giving insurers the choice of paying for a 48-hour hospital stay after mastectomies and testicle removal operations or providing patients with at least one home visit by a care provider within 24 hours.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Sixty workers at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center lost their jobs last week after the hospital closed its skilled nursing facility division where patients go for rehabilitation after a hospital stay. The hospital said its skilled nursing unit has faced financial challenges for several years and has shrunk from 200 beds in the mid-1980s to fewer than 50 last year. "We had to look carefully at this program and decided to close the 38-remaining facility beds," Hopkins said Monday in a statement.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
One year after the General Assembly passed groundbreaking legislation that seemed to give new mothers and their babies a minimum 48-hour hospital stay, irate mothers are asking lawmakers to protect them from being sent home much earlier.Instead of allowing them two days in the hospital, insurers are sending most women and babies home the next day. And women who deliver by Caesarean section are going home in just 48 hours, even though insurers routinely allowed three-day stays for C-section deliveries before the legislation was passed.
NEWS
August 24, 2014
The dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing recently claimed that "today, nurses are full partners and leaders in the heath care process" ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). But if that's so, why are nurses (primarily a female workforce) still being paid at a flat per diem rate out of their hospital's room and board line item? According to a 2007 article in the Journal of Nursing Administration, during the 1920s nurses presented a separate bill to the patient at discharge that directly competed with the hospital and physician bills.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 4, 2005
State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer was hospitalized this week for tests on his heart, which revealed coronary irregularities that will be treated with medication and rest, his spokeswoman said. Schaefer was expected to be released this morning, said Christine Duray, a spokeswoman in the comptroller's office. While adjusting to the medication, Schaefer will reduce his schedule, Duray said. Schaefer, 83, felt dizzy on Monday, and on Tuesday visited his doctor, who recommended that he undergo coronary tests, Duray said.
NEWS
May 11, 1994
The hazards of the job caught up with the Sykesville building inspector Friday.Bill Oler, hired on a two-year contract in January, fell down a hill at the Shannon Run tot lot on Norris Avenue. He broke his leg in two places."It was a very bad and painful break," said Town Manager James L. Schumacher. "We had to get the ambulance."Mr. Oler, who has earned about 500 hours in safety training, added safety inspection to his duties about six weeks ago.After a brief hospital stay, Mr. Oler was recuperating at his Hampstead residence, Mr. Schumacher said.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
After a five-day hospital stay for pneumonia, former Gov. William Donald Schaefer returned Tuesday to his home at the Charlestown retirement community in Catonsville. "The governor is back at Charleston. He's doing very well," Lainy LeBow-Sachs, his long time aide, said Tuesday evening. "The pneumonia is gone. " Schaefer was released from St. Agnes Hospital in Baltimore about 3 p.m., she said. The 89-year-old was admitted last week after he had some trouble breathing. He was treated for pneumonia.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
The cost of treating the uninsured at Maryland hospitals last year jumped by the largest amount in 12 years, prompting economists who run the state's hospital regulatory system to call for more affordable health insurance.But profits statewide jumped 85 percent last year after the system approved higher rates to pay for the expected increase in the number of people unable to pay for medical care.The bill for the uninsured -- $394 million -- grew 28 percent, according to figures released yesterday by the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets hospital rates in Maryland.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Moira Mattingly had only been pregnant for about 24 weeks - still plenty of time, she thought, to pick a name for her daughter. So when she went to the hospital with some discomfort - small pains coming every seven minutes - the news that she was going into labor was alarming. The baby's lungs weren't fully formed, her skin barely so. Mattingly was also confronting sobering statistics: Babies born before 26 weeks, called micropreemies, can easily die and have a high chance of lifelong medical problems like cerebral palsy and blindness.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
For 35 years, Maryland has enjoyed a unique exemption from the federal government that allowed it to regulate hospital rates so that patients are charged the same no matter where they seek care. But the system that state health officials say has created an egalitarian way of charging for health care now faces an unprecedented challenge. The state has come dangerously close to failing a test it must meet every three months to keep the exemption, under which the federal government gives Maryland larger Medicare payments than other states.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
After four nights at Saint Agnes Hospital, Orioles reliever Jim Johnson was finally released Friday morning after a severe case of food poisoning. Johnson, who has converted 15 straight save opportunities dating to last season, acknowledged the experience was frustrating and frightening. "A little of both, depending on the time," Johnson said. "It was pretty bad. " Doctors conducted various tests to rule out specific illnesses, and eventually, food poisoning - including when and where - was pinpointed.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 14, 2011
The cost of a hospital stay in Maryland is on the rise, but not as much as that nationally, according to a report released Wednesday by the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission. The average cost to stay in a Maryland hospital was $10,983 in fiscal year 2010, compared to $10,767 the previous year, according to the report. The 2 percent increase was lower than that nationally, where the cost of a hospital stay increased 3 percent. The markup, or difference between hospitals costs and what hospitals ultimately charge patients, is also the lowest in the nation, the report found.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
The University of Maryland will close its downtown campus for three days because of the Baltimore Grand Prix auto race, and medical staffers are drawing up plans to care for patients as nearby streets are transformed into a high-speed raceway over the Labor Day weekend. Patients are being asked to postpone elective surgeries, some clinics will be closed and classes will be canceled for the Grand Prix — whose open-wheeled cars will race at speeds approaching 190 mph. Some medical staffers will stay at nearby hotels so they won't be caught in traffic snarls on their way to the hospital, officials said.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
After a five-day hospital stay for pneumonia, former Gov. William Donald Schaefer returned Tuesday to his home at the Charlestown retirement community in Catonsville. "The governor is back at Charleston. He's doing very well," Lainy LeBow-Sachs, his long time aide, said Tuesday evening. "The pneumonia is gone. " Schaefer was released from St. Agnes Hospital in Baltimore about 3 p.m., she said. The 89-year-old was admitted last week after he had some trouble breathing. He was treated for pneumonia.
NEWS
By Samantha Bonar and Samantha Bonar,Los Angeles Times | June 27, 2004
A doctor visit or hospital stay is not something most people look forward to. But the experience needn't be unpleasant -- or hazardous to your health. That's the general theme of three recent books that aim to help consumers receive the best medical care possible at a time when healthcare costs are soaring: * How to Survive Your Hospital Stay: The Complete Guide to Getting the Care You Need -- and Avoiding Problems You Don't, by Gail Van Kanegan and Michael Boyette (Simon & Schuster, 248 pages, $14)
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1999
Faced with action by regulators that would cut hospital rates, the Maryland Hospital Association is proposing instead a one-year freeze on rates, Calvin M. Pierson, the association's president, said yesterday.Pierson said a proposal by the state Health Services Cost Review Commission to reduce the cost of an average hospital stay in Maryland by 6 percent over 2 1/2 years, was "totally unacceptable, in our view."Such deep cuts, he said, could mean "thousands of hospital employees laid off" (Maryland hospitals employ about 75,000, according to the association)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
A new study finds that a safety checklist program developed by a Johns Hopkins doctor has reduced patient deaths in Michigan hospitals by 10 percent, in addition to nearly eliminating bloodstream infections in health care facilities that embraced the prevention effort. The research, published in the British Medical Journal, is the first to show a drop in patient mortality in hospitals using the Hopkins program. Previous studies have found major reductions in bloodstream infections from using the checklist when inserting catheters or central lines to give patients medication, fluids or nourishment.
NEWS
March 1, 2010
Jay Hancock's column "Md. hospital stays: the one-day wonder" (Feb. 28), regarding "one day" hospital admissions, fails to address the multi-dimensional nature of the issue. One would conclude from the article that patients admitted to the acute care setting for only one day did not need to be admitted at all and that one-day admissions reflect unnecessary and/or over-utilization of medical resources. While Maryland's unique payment system has indeed given hospitals an incentive to admit patients (as hospitals are reimbursed by this methodology)
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