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NEWS
May 9, 2002
Gail Washington, a Johns Hopkins Hospital records supervisor, died of cancer Sunday at University of Maryland Medical Center. She was 45 and lived in the Windsor Mill section of Baltimore County. She was supervisor of employee records at Johns Hopkins Hospital's department of human resources. She began her career at Hopkins in 1975 as a diet aide. She took classes at the hospital at night to become a pharmacy clerk and later a pharmacy technician. In 1992, she became a human resources data-entry operator and was later promoted to supervisor.
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NEWS
April 18, 2006
Inmate's records are made available Washington County prosecutors won access yesterday to the hospital records of a state prison inmate accused of murdering the correctional officer who was guarding his Hagerstown hospital room. Assistant State's Attorney Eric A. Reed said the confidential records could shed light on the shooter's state of mind, planning and motive in an incident in which guard Jeffery A. Wroten was shot with his own gun Jan. 26 at Washington County Hospital. The inmate had been admitted for treatment of a self-inflicted injury.
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TRAVEL
By Betsy Wade and Betsy Wade,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 1999
Medical preparations for trips to exotic places must include a visit to a doctor or travel clinic for inoculations and advice. But even trips to more conventional places like a spa in California or your cousin's cabin in Colorado should involve gathering items for first aid or other health problems that might arise.For many, this counsel is redundant. Some of my best friends are hypochondriacs, and I do travel with them. I scoff when they climb aboard with Merck Manuals bulging in their pockets, and a first-aid kit that's the size of a carpenter's toolbox.
NEWS
May 9, 2002
Gail Washington, a Johns Hopkins Hospital records supervisor, died of cancer Sunday at University of Maryland Medical Center. She was 45 and lived in the Windsor Mill section of Baltimore County. She was supervisor of employee records at Johns Hopkins Hospital's department of human resources. She began her career at Hopkins in 1975 as a diet aide. She took classes at the hospital at night to become a pharmacy clerk and later a pharmacy technician. In 1992, she became a human resources data-entry operator and was later promoted to supervisor.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
Carrie White, who was declared three years ago the "oldest living person in the world" by the "Guinness Book of World Records," died Thursday at a nursing home in Palatka, Fla. She was 116. Born when Ulysses S. Grant was president, Mrs. White spent 75 years at Florida State Hospital at Chattahoochee, where her husband, John White, admitted her one day after her 35th birthday. Hospital records say she suffered from post-typhoid psychosis, but doctors now are not certain of that diagnosis. She was released from the hospital when she was 109 as part of a program to move geriatric mental patients from state institutions.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
Inmate's records are made available Washington County prosecutors won access yesterday to the hospital records of a state prison inmate accused of murdering the correctional officer who was guarding his Hagerstown hospital room. Assistant State's Attorney Eric A. Reed said the confidential records could shed light on the shooter's state of mind, planning and motive in an incident in which guard Jeffery A. Wroten was shot with his own gun Jan. 26 at Washington County Hospital. The inmate had been admitted for treatment of a self-inflicted injury.
NEWS
March 21, 1993
Hospital Records No Minor MatterI am writing in regards to the letter to the editor that was published on Feb. 21 in The Sun. The letter was titled "No Danger" and was written by John Sernulka of Westminster. The letter concerned a previous article (Feb. 14) referring to Carroll County General's record-keeping procedures.It appears that Mr. Sernulka took some offense at the article . . . I would like to properly identify Mr. Sernulka. John Sernulka is the executive vice president of Carroll County General Hospital.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1995
Helped by a surprising dip in spending on charity care, Maryland hospitals rang up record operating profits of $167 million in 1994 and kept their average cost increases below 3 percent, state officials reported yesterday.Although the report of low cost increases is welcome news for employers and consumers seeking relief from rising medical bills, some employers said Maryland hospitals could be even more efficient.The average cost of a stay at one of Maryland's 51 acute-care hospitals rose to $5,601, a 2.8 percent increase that was the smallest since the state began tracking this information in 1978.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
With a few keystrokes on his computer, Dr. Jed Rosen can get the results of laboratory tests for his patients at Carroll County General Hospital, learn what hospital room a patient is in and obtain a history of a patient's visits to the hospital.Dr. Rosen, a Westminster otolaryngologist, is one of eight local physicians connected to Carroll County General Hospital's main computer system through computers in their private offices.The pilot program, called Physician Access, is the latest phase of Carroll County General's computerization project.
FEATURES
By Young Chang and Young Chang,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1998
Two Virginia babies were switched at birth three years ago, the world learned recently. Since then, talk has abounded: How often does this happen, why and how?Answers are only speculative, but the statistics are startling.About 28,000 babies get switched in hospitals every year, temporarily or permanently, out of four million births, says Nicholas Webb, vice president of technology for Talon Medical Limited, a San Antonio, Texas-based vendor of a new high-tech ID bracelet for newborns. He says his figures are from a 1996 study by Inter/Action Associates, a Las Vegas, Nev.-based security consulting firm.
TRAVEL
By Betsy Wade and Betsy Wade,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 1999
Medical preparations for trips to exotic places must include a visit to a doctor or travel clinic for inoculations and advice. But even trips to more conventional places like a spa in California or your cousin's cabin in Colorado should involve gathering items for first aid or other health problems that might arise.For many, this counsel is redundant. Some of my best friends are hypochondriacs, and I do travel with them. I scoff when they climb aboard with Merck Manuals bulging in their pockets, and a first-aid kit that's the size of a carpenter's toolbox.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1995
Helped by a surprising dip in spending on charity care, Maryland hospitals rang up record operating profits of $167 million in 1994 and kept their average cost increases below 3 percent, state officials reported yesterday.Although the report of low cost increases is welcome news for employers and consumers seeking relief from rising medical bills, some employers said Maryland hospitals could be even more efficient.The average cost of a stay at one of Maryland's 51 acute-care hospitals rose to $5,601, a 2.8 percent increase that was the smallest since the state began tracking this information in 1978.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
With a few keystrokes on his computer, Dr. Jed Rosen can get the results of laboratory tests for his patients at Carroll County General Hospital, learn what hospital room a patient is in and obtain a history of a patient's visits to the hospital.Dr. Rosen, a Westminster otolaryngologist, is one of eight local physicians connected to Carroll County General Hospital's main computer system through computers in their private offices.The pilot program, called Physician Access, is the latest phase of Carroll County General's computerization project.
NEWS
March 21, 1993
Hospital Records No Minor MatterI am writing in regards to the letter to the editor that was published on Feb. 21 in The Sun. The letter was titled "No Danger" and was written by John Sernulka of Westminster. The letter concerned a previous article (Feb. 14) referring to Carroll County General's record-keeping procedures.It appears that Mr. Sernulka took some offense at the article . . . I would like to properly identify Mr. Sernulka. John Sernulka is the executive vice president of Carroll County General Hospital.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
Carrie White, who was declared three years ago the "oldest living person in the world" by the "Guinness Book of World Records," died Thursday at a nursing home in Palatka, Fla. She was 116. Born when Ulysses S. Grant was president, Mrs. White spent 75 years at Florida State Hospital at Chattahoochee, where her husband, John White, admitted her one day after her 35th birthday. Hospital records say she suffered from post-typhoid psychosis, but doctors now are not certain of that diagnosis. She was released from the hospital when she was 109 as part of a program to move geriatric mental patients from state institutions.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 9, 2000
BUDAPEST, Hungary - For hours, the old man studies the face in the mirror. The deep-set eyes. The gray stubble on the chin. The furrows of the brow. It is his face, but to him it is a startling revelation. He has not seen it in 53 years. He no longer remembers the name that goes with the face. He calls himself Andras Tamas because that is the name on the records from the Russian psychiatric hospital where he spent a half-century until his release last month. But a few days ago, when Dr. Andras Veer, the Hungarian psychiatrist who is treating him now at a hospital in Budapest, handed him a pen, Tamas wrote another name.
NEWS
January 31, 1995
Ness named director of hospital's recordsPamela Ness of York, Pa., has been named director of medical records at Carroll County General Hospital.A registered record administrator, Ms. Ness has worked for hospitals in Pennsylvania since 1986, when she was hired by Holy Spirit Hospital in Camp Hill to supervise its medical records department.In 1988, she joined the staff of York's Memorial Hospital as department manager. At Memorial, she developed criteria to monitor the hospital's medical records for the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Health Care Organizations.
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