Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHospital Rates
IN THE NEWS

Hospital Rates

BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
State hospital rate regulators approved a temporary rate increase yesterday for Johns Hopkins Hospital and permanent rate boosts for four other hospitals, including Harford County's Upper Chesapeake Medical Center, which ran into unexpected financial difficulties after its opening nearly a year ago. Harbor Hospital Center in South Baltimore was also seeking higher rates, but the Health Services Cost Review Commission staff recommended a 2.02 percent cut....
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
Armed with new data on inflation in hospital costs, the state's rate-setting commission approved a 3.97 percent average rate increase yesterday for Maryland hospitals for the fiscal year that began this month. Only last month the Health Services Cost Review Commission had approved a 3.22 percent increase. But Robert Murray, executive director of the commission, got new inflation figures late last week, and the commission agreed to move up the rate increase. Yesterday's action ends several months of wrangling before the commission, in which hospitals said proposed rates were not enough to cover their increasing costs, and insurers argued that rates should be kept down to mitigate premium increases for consumers.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
State regulators approved an additional 0.4 percent rate increase for hospitals yesterday - adding about $24 million to Maryland's collective hospital bill for the fiscal year beginning July 1 - but a further adjustment next month could cancel out the increase. Yesterday's action by the Health Services Cost Review Commission would mean that hospitals get a 3.22 percent rate increase on average. However, next month the commission will reduce that rate to compensate for the larger increase that some hospitals already received.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield charged yesterday that the state's insurance commissioner exceeded his authority when he turned down CareFirst's request for a 50 percent increase in premiums for its existing open-enrollment health policies. The state's largest insurer made its arguments at a hearing before the commissioner, Steven B. Larsen, as it appealed Larsen's denial of the rate boost. In support of its rate request, CareFirst said it lost about $2 million on 1,850 open-enrollment policies.
NEWS
April 28, 2001
State hospital rates have not kept pace with increasing costs A rebuttal by the state hospital regulatory commission to a recent column by Barry Rascovar ("State can't afford prescription drugs," Opinion Commentary, March 25) left readers with the wrong impression ("Hospital rates reflect state's careful formula," letters, April 14). In recent years, Maryland hospital rates -- set by state regulations -- have not kept pace with inflation. The cost of salaries to recruit and retain a qualified workforce, investments in patient-safety initiatives and keeping up with new technologies and life-saving drugs has risen much more rapidly than the rates have.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2001
At the end of October, Upper Chesapeake Health closed the antiquated Fallston General Hospital and opened the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The new facility, in a convenient and rapidly growing part of Harford County, immediately attracted more patients than the old Fallston facility, as hospital management had expected - about 25 percent more admissions in the new hospital's first four months. What they hadn't expected was that Upper Chesapeake would start losing money and that the more patients came, the more it would lose.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2000
Maryland hospitals saw their operating margins drop by about two-thirds in the fiscal year that ended June 30, the Maryland Hospital Association reported yesterday. As a group, the hospitals had a 0.65 percent margin on operations - revenue received for patient care minus costs - and a total margin of 2.36 percent. Total margin includes nonhospital revenue such as investment income. That's down from a 1.93 percent operating margin and a 2.98 percent total margin in the previous fiscal year.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
State hospital rate regulators approved deals yesterday between CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield and two local hospitals in which CareFirst's FreeState HMO gets lower rates and agrees to steer patients to those hospitals. In addition to those two hospitals - Mercy Medical Center in downtown Baltimore and St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson - CareFirst hopes to conclude similar deals with up to four other hospitals over the next few months, Bruce Edwards, CareFirst's vice president of network management, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
State regulators approved a plan yesterday to reform the way Maryland sets hospital rates after a work group hammered out a compromise that would phase in increases and avoid the uncertainty and rancor of annual debates over how much hospital rates should change. The plan will give hospitals an inpatient rate increase of 2 percent for the fiscal year beginning in July -- less than the expected inflation rate of 2.7 percent, which hospitals had been seeking. After the first year, rates could track inflation as long as Maryland keeps its costs below national benchmarks.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2000
A work group trying to redesign the state's hospital rate-setting mechanism reached broad consensus yesterday on the shape of the system and on long-term goals, but remained split on how much of a rate increase hospitals should get this year. The work group will meet again next week, after reviewing a new rate proposal from Maryland hospitals. The hospitals have been seeking a rate increase for the year equal to inflation -- 2.5 percent to 3 percent -- and argued that anything less could cause the quality of care to deteriorate.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.