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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Since becoming a part of the University of Maryland Medical System three years ago, Upper Chesapeake Health has attracted new doctors, broken ground on a new $60 million cancer center and won over patients who once left Harford County for care. Upper Chesapeake, with hospitals in Bel Air and Havre de Grace, was only able to afford such upgrades because of its new affiliation with the larger, better-capitalized University of Maryland Medical System, executives said. And it's not done.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
Good Samaritan Hospital agreed to pay $793,548 to settle allegations that it submitted false claims to federal health benefit programs for four years ending in December 2008, federal Department of Justice officials reported Wednesday. The hospital denied any wrongdoing, but federal officials say the MedStar Health System hospital listed some patients admitted to the hospital as suffering from malnutrition when they were not diagnosed or treated for that condition. It was marked as a secondary condition in each case.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
Maryland hospitals are gearing up to challenge state rate-setters' efforts to squeeze hospital rates by nearly 4 percent.The rate squeeze was triggered by a formula designed to make sure Maryland's hospital costs don't increase at a faster rate than the national average. This past year, Maryland costs grew by 4.5 percent, about double the national rate, while hospital profits reached record levels.The "correction factor," which began taking effect this month, doesn't mean every hospital will see its rates cut -- in fact, the Maryland Hospital Association estimated about half will get an increase.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1995
Helped by a surprising dip in spending on charity care, Maryland hospitals rang up record operating profits of $167 million in 1994 and kept their average cost increases below 3 percent, state officials reported yesterday.Although the report of low cost increases is welcome news for employers and consumers seeking relief from rising medical bills, some employers said Maryland hospitals could be even more efficient.The average cost of a stay at one of Maryland's 51 acute-care hospitals rose to $5,601, a 2.8 percent increase that was the smallest since the state began tracking this information in 1978.
NEWS
January 2, 2000
STATE regulators placed Maryland hospitals on a rate-loss diet a few years ago, but the bureaucrats may have overdone it: For some medical centers, it has turned into a starvation diet that could threaten patients' well-being. Indeed, there is evidence that regulators' cutbacks on hospital rate charges helped precipitate staffing reductions at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, especially nursing shortages, that led to serious medical problems for patients. Shady Grove's accreditation is now threatened.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
The Maryland Hospital Association has sent a letter to state health officials saying it will not support a proposal that would link medical spending to the state's economic growth. The state presented the proposal to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March as part of an application to update its Medicare waiver, an agreement with the federal government unique to Maryland that allows the state to set uniform hospital rates. The hospital association has said in the past the proposal raises concerns, but the April 25 letter is the first time the group publicly said it would not support it. The letter is addressed to Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein and John M. Colmers, chairman of the Health Services Cost Review Commission, the agency that sets hospital rates in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
Maryland hospitals and the state regulators who set their rates came closer yesterday on a plan to hold down costs -- but the regulators still want to reduce costs, while the hospitals are still proposing a freeze on charges."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | June 3, 2013
The New York Times looked at the varying costs of a colonoscopy at hospitals around the country to illustrate how simple medical procedures are driving up health care costs. The story that ran over the weekend found that the costs of medical procedures in the United States are often higher than in other developing countries and varies widely from hospital to hospital. Baltimore has some of the lowest rates for colonoscopies, according to one New York Times chart. The most someone will pay for a colonoscopy in the city is $1,908.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 6, 2014
Top Maryland officials highlighted a change in the way hospitals are charging patients for treatment - and a related push to prevent unnecessary admissions -- during a stop Wednesday in Western Maryland. Maryland has long regulated hospital rates under a unique agreement with federal officials, but has altered its waiver in a way that provides hospitals with a budget based on their projected patient population rather than a fee for every service performed. The idea is to cut costs and improve care by encouraging more preventive measures.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
The state commission that regulates hospital rates has not kept adequate tabs on hospital billings, according to legislative auditors, who say that four hospitals they checked have overcharged by more than $13 million. An audit of three regulatory agencies under the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene found "control deficiencies" at one, the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which left auditors with a "lack of assurance" that billings by the state's 53 hospitals were proper.
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