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Hospital Plans

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NEWS
October 25, 1996
Frederick Memorial Hospital plans to consolidate its Mount Airy health care services and open physicians' offices in the Dubbaneh Plaza building on Capital Avenue.A corporation formed by the hospital bought the building for $2.3 million in 1995 and will spend about $1 million renovating it, according to Ken Coffey, assistant vice president for marketing and development.The project is scheduled for completion in February.The hospital plans to move its laboratory, X-ray and ultrasound service from rented space in Mount Airy Shopping Center and its blood-testing laboratory from rented space at Dr. Ronald Miller's Mount Airy Family Health Care Center on Culwell Drive.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 20, 2014
Anne Arundel Medical Center has adopted a new policy that prohibits use of all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. And next year, the hospital plans to stop hiring anyone who uses tobacco products. The hospital has banned cigarette smoking on campus since 2007, like many hospitals, but the new policy in effect July 1 was expanded to include the smokeless products. And there will be no designated smoking areas in garages or on sidewalks. The policy applies to staff, as well as vendors and visitors.
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NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1998
Carroll County General Hospital has two projects on the drawing board for 1999: the construction of an oncology center in Westminster and the opening of an outpatient radiology center at the nearby Richard N. Dixon Building.The hospital's plan to build a one-story, 13,250-square-foot cancer treatment center on South Center Street is scheduled for a hearing before the county Board of Zoning Appeals on Dec. 29.In the Dixon Building, the hospital plans to renovate the second floor to consolidate outpatient radiology services offered at Carroll County General and at a Poole Road facility operated by the hospital's partner, Advanced Radiology, P.A.The hospital has added services or facilities in each of the past two years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Nancy P. "Polly" Deeley, a homemaker and volunteer, died Tuesday of heart failure at the Pickersgill Retirement Community in West Towson. She was 88. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Nancy Price was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. She was a 1943 graduate of Towson High School and earned her nursing degree in 1946 from the Union Memorial Hospital School of Nursing. In 1946, she married Charles Carey "Skip" Deeley Sr., a dental supply company executive who died in 2012.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Weeks of community meetings and discussions with Sheppard Pratt Health System officials have done little to ease the minds of neighbors to a mental health outpatient facility slated to open in Ruxton this fall. That much is clear from the red and white "No Retreat" signs dotting nearly every lawn on quiet, tree-lined LaBelle Avenue. But until the hospital applies for a license to run the group home, residents say they are in wait-and-see mode. "It's hard to say what we're going to do until we've seen their application and if they get one. The licensing folks may say they don't qualify," said Tom Costello, director of No Retreat Inc., a group that formed to oppose Sheppard Pratt's plan.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1996
Children's Hospital plans to build an $8 million, 136-bed nursing home on its Greenspring Avenue campus, hospital President Robert A. Chrzan announced yesterday.The hospital will seek approval from the state agency that reviews health facilities and from city planning officials. If all goes smoothly, construction could begin by late spring, and the nursing home would open a year later.Children's announcement represents an example of a hospital with a low and declining inpatient census' reaching out to attract people and revenue in other ways.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | November 27, 1991
Carroll County General Hospital plans a second phase renovation thatwould expand emergency and operating rooms and modernize the obstetrics and gynecological wing.Also included in the proposed construction would be the addition of a third-floor patient wing on the west side of the hospital below the new psychiatric unit.The hospital plans to finance most of the $5.1 million project through a $1 million contribution from the Carroll County Hospital Foundation, the hospital's non-profit fund-raising arm, and the sale of $3.4 million in tax-free municipal bonds, which have been authorized by the state, and must be approved by the county commissioners.
NEWS
January 17, 2007
Board names Naftal as its chairman Jordan Naftal, owner of Jordan's Steakhouse in Ellicott City, has been named chairman of the Maryland Hospitality Education Foundation's board of directors. The foundation works to ensure the growth of the Maryland hospitality industry and trains students for hospitality careers. It offers food safety certifications, responsible alcohol service certifications and management training, as well as ProStart, its two-year curriculum for high school students interested in the restaurant and foodservice industry.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
The Johns Hopkins doctor who was shot by the son of a patient is in fair condition today, a hospital spokesman said. David B. Cohen was shot yesterday after a tense discussion with the son, who was distraught about his mother's condition. The shooter, Paul Warren Pardus, then locked himself in the room with his mother and fatally shot her and himself. The incident caused a day-long panic at the hospital, where many people were evacuated and others were told to stay in their offices and rooms.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | January 11, 1995
Howard County General Hospital raised about $100,000 for its Maternal-Child Health Services and Programs through the Symphony of Lights holiday display at Symphony Woods in Columbia.More than 43,000 vehicles carrying about 200,000 people made the winding, 1.4-mile trip through the central Columbia park to see more than 40 animated and stationary light displays from Nov. 21 to Jan. 1."The hospital views the Symphony of Lights as an overwhelming success, which accomplished our two-fold objective of raising substantial funds for the hospital and doing something special for our community," said David A. Abramson, chairman of the hospital's board of trustees.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A group seeking to use the old Crownsville Hospital Center for nonprofit organizations will hold a public meeting on Thursday night. The meeting is planned for 7:30 p.m. at South Shore Elementary School, 1376 Fairfield Loop Road in Crownsville. A group of nonprofits organized as the Community Services Center at Crownsville, Inc. has been working for five years to get permission to use the property. Their goal is to create a campus of groups that offer veterans' services, community services and educational programs.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Weeks of community meetings and discussions with Sheppard Pratt Health System officials have done little to ease the minds of neighbors to a mental health outpatient facility slated to open in Ruxton this fall. That much is clear from the red and white "No Retreat" signs dotting nearly every lawn on quiet, tree-lined LaBelle Avenue. But until the hospital applies for a license to run the group home, residents say they are in wait-and-see mode. "It's hard to say what we're going to do until we've seen their application and if they get one. The licensing folks may say they don't qualify," said Tom Costello, director of No Retreat Inc., a group that formed to oppose Sheppard Pratt's plan.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
Ruxton residents might not have the law on their side in trying to thwart plans for a high-end mental health rehabilitation center in their neighborhood, but that won't stop them from putting up a fight. Though Sheppard Pratt Medical Systems' proposal is protected by federal and state housing laws, according to experts, residents are exploring other options to halt the Towson-based hospital's effort to convert a six-bedroom house on Labelle Avenue into a facility for patients undergoing treatment for issues such as depression and anxiety.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
The Johns Hopkins doctor who was shot by the son of a patient is in fair condition today, a hospital spokesman said. David B. Cohen was shot yesterday after a tense discussion with the son, who was distraught about his mother's condition. The shooter, Paul Warren Pardus, then locked himself in the room with his mother and fatally shot her and himself. The incident caused a day-long panic at the hospital, where many people were evacuated and others were told to stay in their offices and rooms.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
Howard County General Hospital will present its fifth Latino Health Fair from noon to 4 p.m. March 14 at the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, 10431 Twin Rivers Road. The event is co-sponsored by Priority Partners, St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Howard County Health Department and Alianza de la Comunidad. Blood pressure, colorectal cancer and glucose and cholesterol screenings will be available. Cardiac risk information will be distributed. Dental screenings for children, HIV testing and clinical breast exams will be offered.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,james.drew@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley says he supports legislation to correct "abusive billing and collection practices" by some Maryland hospitals, while expanding health care and financial assistance for lower-income patients. The governor spoke Friday in Baltimore as his administration released a report that recommends defining who is eligible for free and reduced-price hospital care, requiring hospitals to provide financial assistance information to all patients, and banning hospitals and their collection agencies from charging the uninsured interest and penalties on bills before court judgments are entered against them.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
Liberty Medical Center plans a $5.5 million Urban Medical Institute that would deploy health professionals and neighborhood residents to attack disease rates in West Baltimore that are among the state's highest.The plan, announced yesterday, calls for a new outpatient center on the hospital's grounds off Liberty Heights Avenue and a renovated street-level clinic in nearby Sandtown-Winchester, where the housing stock is already the focus of a spirited revitalization campaign.Both are scheduled for occupancy in June 1995.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
Howard County General Hospital is to announce soon the biggest building project in the hospital's 27-year history, a $20 million addition that will triple the capacity of its emergency department. The three-story, 65,927-square-foot addition is intended to improve services in an emergency room that one hospital official described as "bursting at the seams." The $20 million price tag, listed on a Howard County building permit application filed last week, is an estimate of construction costs.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | September 18, 2008
Sykesville residents voiced concerns last night that Maryland health officials will soon house mentally challenged people who have been deemed unfit to stand trial at the Springfield Hospital Center, a state mental facility that is within a mile of an elementary school and park frequented by children. The residents spoke at a forum at the center's campus last night led by Maryland Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary John Colmers. The forum was held to inform the community about the transfer of residents from the Rosewood Center in Owings Mills to the Springfield Center's Muncie Building, which would be converted into a 22-patient facility for people in the newly formed Sykesville Secure Evaluation and Therapeutic program.
NEWS
January 17, 2007
Board names Naftal as its chairman Jordan Naftal, owner of Jordan's Steakhouse in Ellicott City, has been named chairman of the Maryland Hospitality Education Foundation's board of directors. The foundation works to ensure the growth of the Maryland hospitality industry and trains students for hospitality careers. It offers food safety certifications, responsible alcohol service certifications and management training, as well as ProStart, its two-year curriculum for high school students interested in the restaurant and foodservice industry.
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