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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 22, 2000
A Westminster woman was held yesterday without bail at the Carroll County Detention Center on armed robbery, auto theft, cocaine and other related charges and probation violations, court records show. Miriam Rivera, 36, whose last known address was in the 100 block of Kriders Church Road, is accused of robbing an Amoco gas station and convenience store Friday at Route 140 and Englar Road in Westminster. Rivera was arrested shortly after the incident at 12:55 p.m. by state and Westminster police, who found her in a Main Street convenience store.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
In the hospital supply room, Ricardo Thomas checks his list against the boxes he has put on a cart to take to an operating area, making sure he has it right. "You look at the stock number and you will know — so you don't get mixed up," Thomas says, pointing to the number on the form and then the number on the carton. "Right there is the stock number. " He double-checks to make sure the form and carton list the same materials. "I sign out the orders, and I take them where they have to go," Thomas says.
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FEATURES
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
Four years ago, Glen Burnie resident Debi Katzenberger was finding it difficult to purchase the family's new Christmas pajamas. It was a tradition she had with her own children and passed along to her grandchildren. But this was the first Christmas without her granddaughter, Kamryn Lambert, who passed away one month before her ninth birthday from complications of leukemia. "My daughter asked me why I hadn't bought the pajamas, and I said I was having a hard time not buying any for Kamryn," said Katzenberger.
FEATURES
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
Four years ago, Glen Burnie resident Debi Katzenberger was finding it difficult to purchase the family's new Christmas pajamas. It was a tradition she had with her own children and passed along to her grandchildren. But this was the first Christmas without her granddaughter, Kamryn Lambert, who passed away one month before her ninth birthday from complications of leukemia. "My daughter asked me why I hadn't bought the pajamas, and I said I was having a hard time not buying any for Kamryn," said Katzenberger.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
In the hospital supply room, Ricardo Thomas checks his list against the boxes he has put on a cart to take to an operating area, making sure he has it right. "You look at the stock number and you will know — so you don't get mixed up," Thomas says, pointing to the number on the form and then the number on the carton. "Right there is the stock number. " He double-checks to make sure the form and carton list the same materials. "I sign out the orders, and I take them where they have to go," Thomas says.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Julie Scharper and Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Paul Warren Pardus did not have to evade security Thursday when he took a handgun to the eighth floor of the Nelson Building at Johns Hopkins Hospital. There was nothing to stop him from carrying a gun into the hospital, no metal detector to set off an alarm. While Hopkins has long focused on safety at its sprawling medical campus in crime-plagued East Baltimore, the hospital does not require patients or visitors to pass through metal detectors, as Americans must do now at airports, courthouses and many federal buildings.
NEWS
February 26, 1992
Officials at the Baltimore City Detention Center today were investigating the death of an 18-year-old man who may have strangled himself in the institution's hospital ward.Roderick Wade Jackson, of the 600 block of Fremont Ave. in West Baltimore, was found about 4 p.m. Monday in a bathroom in the hospital ward.A rope made from a hospital gown was around his neck and attached to the bathroom door, said Barbara Cooper, a Detention Center spokeswoman.Ms. Cooper could not say why Mr. Jackson was a patient there.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | August 31, 1992
Baltimore boy, 9, drowns in quarryBALTIMORE -- A 9-year-old Baltimore boy drowned yesterday afternoon in a quarry off Falls Road, where he disappeared while swimming with friends, police reported.The body of Jason White was found by a city police officer and a paramedic who searched the chilly waters for 40 minutes. Jason had apparently been under water for an hour, and resuscitation efforts were futile.Police said Jason was apparently overpowered by the current of the water, which is 8 to 10 feet deep, police said.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
A former employee at Taylor Manor Hospital in Ellicott City pleaded guilty yesterday to charges stemming from a sexual assault against a 15-year-old patient there last summer. Alvin Tyrone Williams, 40, described by a prosecutor as a psychiatric nurse counselor, pleaded guilty to attempted third-degree sexual offense, a crime that carries a maximum 10-year prison term. Under a plea agreement, prosecutors have agreed to cap their request for prison time at five years, said Senior Assistant State's Attorney Mary V. Murphy.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2002
A former psychiatric nurse-counselor at Taylor Manor Hospital in Ellicott City was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison for sexually assaulting a teen-age girl who had been admitted there for treatment for post-traumatic stress. Alvin Tyrone Williams, 41, abused a young woman who was vulnerable and could not fend for herself, Howard Circuit Judge Lenore R. Gelfman said before imposing a five-year term, suspending all but two years. Gelfman also placed Williams, who pleaded guilty to attempted third-degree sexual offense in June, on five years' probation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, Julie Scharper and Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Paul Warren Pardus did not have to evade security Thursday when he took a handgun to the eighth floor of the Nelson Building at Johns Hopkins Hospital. There was nothing to stop him from carrying a gun into the hospital, no metal detector to set off an alarm. While Hopkins has long focused on safety at its sprawling medical campus in crime-plagued East Baltimore, the hospital does not require patients or visitors to pass through metal detectors, as Americans must do now at airports, courthouses and many federal buildings.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 22, 2000
A Westminster woman was held yesterday without bail at the Carroll County Detention Center on armed robbery, auto theft, cocaine and other related charges and probation violations, court records show. Miriam Rivera, 36, whose last known address was in the 100 block of Kriders Church Road, is accused of robbing an Amoco gas station and convenience store Friday at Route 140 and Englar Road in Westminster. Rivera was arrested shortly after the incident at 12:55 p.m. by state and Westminster police, who found her in a Main Street convenience store.
NEWS
November 28, 2005
State officials' decision to seek to shut down the Chesapeake Youth Center is a victory both for the children who were ill-treated there and for the staff and advocates who spoke up for them. It is rare for the state to revoke a license for a residential treatment center such as Chesapeake, which cares for up to 60 seriously mentally ill children. But the severity of the charges - and the number of separate, confirmable reports of mistreatment - made it inevitable. "I felt like I was being exposed," a 17-year-old girl told state investigators, when nurses at Chesapeake Youth Center punished her for assaulting a doctor by making her wear nothing but a paper hospital gown for several days.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | July 21, 1991
Paulette Merrills spends 14 hours a day dishing out Caribbean foodWhen Paulette Merrills opened the Caribbean Cafe, she faced a tough challenge: getting crab-loving Baltimoreans to try curried goat.To draw people in, she decided to keep prices low ($8 is considered expensive), quality high and offer free samples.Eight months later, her efforts have paid off. She's attracted a devoted following to her Federal Hill carryout and plans to offer Caribbean cooking classes in the fall."It's always been in me to cook," explains Ms. Merrills, 32, the chef and co-owner with her musician husband, Ronald.
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