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NEWS
December 18, 2005
Donald E. Marsh, a food and nutrition administrator at Morrison Healthcare Food Services, died of cancer Monday at his Ellicott City home. He was 62. Born and raised in Warren, Pa., Mr. Marsh graduated from Eisenhower High School in 1961. He went to Pennsylvania State University, where he met Joanna King, whom he married in 1965. He graduated in 1965 with a bachelor's degree in food service administration. Mr. Marsh worked at various hospitals, including Warren General Hospital, Pennsylvania Hospital and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
Charles S. "DC" Reed, former food service director at Johns Hopkins Hospital and Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died July 24 of lung cancer at his Towson home. He was 79. Born and raised in Towson, Mr. Reed attended Loyola High School and graduated in 1949 from Towson Catholic High School. Mr. Reed enlisted in the Navy and served as a gunner's mate aboard the subchaser USS Crestview and later on the carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt and the destroyer USS Hemminger. After being discharged from active duty, he remained a naval reservist until 1958.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 5, 1996
Good news. The Ambassador, one of Baltimore's fine apartment-house dining rooms in its heyday, is reopening after closing last New Year's Eve. It could be back in business as early as next week. Service America will be managing it, with Jon Mark as chef. He's worked in such prestigious kitchens as the Inn at Perry Cabin.In spite of Mark's background, the plan is not to compete with the Polo Grill and Jeannier's (the two fine-dining restaurants in the immediate area). Instead, says manager Margaret Jackson, the Ambassador will offer American cuisine, with "home cooking" specials to attract the apartment dwellers on a regular basis.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | December 22, 2008
Upstairs at Franklin Square Hospital Center, they're treating patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Downstairs in the cafeteria, onion rings and french fries glisten under the orange glow of a heat lamp. Upstairs at Johns Hopkins Hospital, they're treating patients for heart disease. Downstairs the patients - and the doctors who treat them - can order bacon cheeseburgers packing 822 calories and 42 grams of fat. Ironic? "It's incredible what people seemingly with a mind for health and medicine will accept as normal hospital fare," says Susan Levin, a dietitian with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | July 12, 1993
Looking forward to the Summer Reading Program at the library this week?Well, you won't be disappointed. Storyteller and poet Marc Spiegel will enchant you with his original stories, poems and songs at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Brooklyn Park library, 1 E. 11th Ave. His performance is free and open to preschoolers and children entering grades one through six. Registration is not required for the hour-long show, but seating is limited and will be available on...
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | August 2, 2003
IT WAS A sobering sight, the Mercy Medical Center's St. Paul Place entrance canopy draped in black and violet crepe. All the published tributes to Sister Mary Thomas Zinkand, the president of the hospital for 35 years, who died last week, lauded her for a life so well spent. Only a few months before, I sat with her reminiscing about aspects of the Sisters of Mercy's history. At 88, her mind was sharp and so accurate, her manner was disarmingly contagious. I can see why she was a leader who made Baltimore a better place.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | December 22, 2008
Upstairs at Franklin Square Hospital Center, they're treating patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Downstairs in the cafeteria, onion rings and french fries glisten under the orange glow of a heat lamp. Upstairs at Johns Hopkins Hospital, they're treating patients for heart disease. Downstairs the patients - and the doctors who treat them - can order bacon cheeseburgers packing 822 calories and 42 grams of fat. Ironic? "It's incredible what people seemingly with a mind for health and medicine will accept as normal hospital fare," says Susan Levin, a dietitian with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
Charles S. "DC" Reed, former food service director at Johns Hopkins Hospital and Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died July 24 of lung cancer at his Towson home. He was 79. Born and raised in Towson, Mr. Reed attended Loyola High School and graduated in 1949 from Towson Catholic High School. Mr. Reed enlisted in the Navy and served as a gunner's mate aboard the subchaser USS Crestview and later on the carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt and the destroyer USS Hemminger. After being discharged from active duty, he remained a naval reservist until 1958.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
An elderly Kent County man was in critical condition yesterday after contracting salmonella poisoning at a dinner held by a volunteer fire company, health officials said. At least 16 other people were sickened by the bacteria.Authorities would not identify the elderly man but said he was admitted Wednesday to Kent & Queen Anne's Hospital in Chestertown. "He's more critical today than yesterday, and we're very concerned," said Dr. John A. Grant of the Kent County Health Department.The dinner was held as a fund-raiser by Millington Fire Company March 20, one of four such meals the company prepares each year.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
The sixth annual Brian's Baseball Bash -- a fundraiser for the University of Maryland Children's Hospital, hosted by Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts -- will take place Aug. 12 at Dave & Buster's in Arundel Mills mall. The bash, which benefits the University of Maryland Children's Hospital, includes food, games, silent and live auctions and opportunities to mingle with Orioles players and get autographs. Admission is $200 for adults and $150 for children under 12. For information, call Krista Ellis at 410-328-6064 or go to officialbrianroberts.com.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
Donald E. Marsh, a food and nutrition administrator at Morrison Healthcare Food Services, died of cancer Monday at his Ellicott City home. He was 62. Born and raised in Warren, Pa., Mr. Marsh graduated from Eisenhower High School in 1961. He went to Pennsylvania State University, where he met Joanna King, whom he married in 1965. He graduated in 1965 with a bachelor's degree in food service administration. Mr. Marsh worked at various hospitals, including Warren General Hospital, Pennsylvania Hospital and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | August 2, 2003
IT WAS A sobering sight, the Mercy Medical Center's St. Paul Place entrance canopy draped in black and violet crepe. All the published tributes to Sister Mary Thomas Zinkand, the president of the hospital for 35 years, who died last week, lauded her for a life so well spent. Only a few months before, I sat with her reminiscing about aspects of the Sisters of Mercy's history. At 88, her mind was sharp and so accurate, her manner was disarmingly contagious. I can see why she was a leader who made Baltimore a better place.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
An elderly Kent County man was in critical condition yesterday after contracting salmonella poisoning at a dinner held by a volunteer fire company, health officials said. At least 16 other people were sickened by the bacteria.Authorities would not identify the elderly man but said he was admitted Wednesday to Kent & Queen Anne's Hospital in Chestertown. "He's more critical today than yesterday, and we're very concerned," said Dr. John A. Grant of the Kent County Health Department.The dinner was held as a fund-raiser by Millington Fire Company March 20, one of four such meals the company prepares each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 5, 1996
Good news. The Ambassador, one of Baltimore's fine apartment-house dining rooms in its heyday, is reopening after closing last New Year's Eve. It could be back in business as early as next week. Service America will be managing it, with Jon Mark as chef. He's worked in such prestigious kitchens as the Inn at Perry Cabin.In spite of Mark's background, the plan is not to compete with the Polo Grill and Jeannier's (the two fine-dining restaurants in the immediate area). Instead, says manager Margaret Jackson, the Ambassador will offer American cuisine, with "home cooking" specials to attract the apartment dwellers on a regular basis.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | July 12, 1993
Looking forward to the Summer Reading Program at the library this week?Well, you won't be disappointed. Storyteller and poet Marc Spiegel will enchant you with his original stories, poems and songs at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Brooklyn Park library, 1 E. 11th Ave. His performance is free and open to preschoolers and children entering grades one through six. Registration is not required for the hour-long show, but seating is limited and will be available on...
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | November 16, 1991
CITY SPRINGS CAFEMercy Medical Center, 301 St. Paul Place. Hours: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays to Fridays. Call 659-2900; FAX 332-0325.Got a hankering for hospital food? Probably not, but this is different. If you're looking for a clean, friendly place to pick up breakfast, lunch or an early dinner, City Springs Cafe at the renovated Mercy Medical Center is worth considering. This self-service cafe is more downtown deli than hospital cafeteria. It's a bright, quiet room off the new lobby with windows overlooking the hospital's circular drive.
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