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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
City police said they were investigating an unusual armed robbery that took place Tuesday afternoon on the third-floor of a downtown hospital. The robbery was reported around 1:10 p.m. at Mercy Medical Center's McAuley Tower, in the 300 block of St. Paul Pl. Det. Jeremy Silbert, a police spokesman, said two hospital employees were robbed of cash from their personal belongings. The incident prompted police to set up a perimeter around the hospital. Silbert said police were reviewing surveillance camera footage and were exploring whether the robbery was tied to another that took place recently in the same area.
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NEWS
By Jane Lipscomb | April 25, 2013
Workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard in hospitals and other health care facilities, a fact that has escaped an unsuspecting public. Nationally, nursing assistants employed by nursing homes have the highest incidence of workplace assault among all workers, according to federal data. For women who work in nursing homes, social services and hospitals, the likelihood of being harmed on the job is like that of women working the late-night shift in convenience stores. To draw attention to these and other hidden risks, the Alliance Against Workplace Violence has designated April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month.
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NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among hospital staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
City police said they were investigating an unusual armed robbery that took place Tuesday afternoon on the third-floor of a downtown hospital. The robbery was reported around 1:10 p.m. at Mercy Medical Center's McAuley Tower, in the 300 block of St. Paul Pl. Det. Jeremy Silbert, a police spokesman, said two hospital employees were robbed of cash from their personal belongings. The incident prompted police to set up a perimeter around the hospital. Silbert said police were reviewing surveillance camera footage and were exploring whether the robbery was tied to another that took place recently in the same area.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | November 11, 1990
Patients won't be the only ones giving urine samples if hospitals begin testing employees for drug use.Nurses, doctors and others applying for work at the 68 hospitals in the state could soon face the same drug-testing as do airline pilots and football players.About a quarter of the hospitals already test for drugs before hiring staff, said Richard Wade, vice president for communications for the Maryland Hospital Association, a trade organization made up of public and private hospitals.A substance-abuse task force of the association is working on a policy that recommends that hospitals require pre-employment drug tests for all staff and physicians applying for privileges, Wade said.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | April 11, 1991
The Johns Hopkins Health System announced Tuesday that it would delay for 60 days the scheduled May 12 closing of two community psychiatric programs at Homewood North Hospital. But some hospital employees still worry about the future of the programs' patients."My concern is that this is not an answer to the true problem," said Sharon Barolet, a Homewood North employee, referring to the patients' fate when the hospital is finally closed."I want Hopkins to make a commitment to maintain services here until a successor can be found to take over the services,"she said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 13, 2004
Three Springfield Hospital Center employees were overcome by fumes yesterday from a pesticide fogger being used inside an enclosed greenhouse, hospital officials said. Two hospital security personnel and a maintenance worker responding to the greenhouse about 12:40 p.m. were overcome by fumes, said Dr. Jonathan Book, clinical director at Springfield. None of the men was wearing protective gear, he said. Hospital employees use the foggers once a month in the greenhouse, Book said, but this time used a different fumigation product, called Plant-Fume.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The continuing series of meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority at the hospital, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
A hearty response from the community, staff and physicians has brought the Carroll County General Hospital capital campaign to a close at127 percent of its goal, said H. Hugh Dawkins, president of the CCGHFoundation Board of Directors.The campaign raised $3.82 million toward new equipment such as a magnetic resonance imaging machine, and expansion such as that planned in the emergency and surgery departments. The campaign goal had been $3 million, Dawkins said."It was a fantastic success," Dawkins said of the campaign, whichstarted two years ago.Of the $3.82 million raised, $2.5 million came through individuals and corporations that donated large gifts.
NEWS
April 18, 2000
Ceremony to mark milestone for hospital The last steel beam for the new six-story hospital of Anne Arundel Medical Center will be ceremonially put in place Thursday morning as a milestone in the $63 million construction project at the new medical park campus. Hospital contributors, along with officials including County Executive Janet S. Owens, are expected to take part in the "topping off" ceremony as a crane hoists the beam -- signed by hospital employees and guests -- onto the 250,000-square-foot structure.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
A federal grand jury has indicted four people, including a former employee of the University of Maryland Medical Center, in what prosecutors said was a scheme to steal patients' identities. The 17-count indictment was unsealed Thursday after the arrests of Kenneth Elliott McDowell, 47; Wendy Hinton, 21; and William White, 54, all of Baltimore. Devin Jarmal Smith, also known as Sean Jones, 20, also of Baltimore, is still being sought. "The defendants are charged with preying upon seriously ill hospital patients and their families by using their personal information to access their credit accounts and even to open new credit accounts using their identities," Rod J. Rosenstein, Maryland's U.S. attorney, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Barbara Moseley | July 11, 2011
Imagine if your employer of 35 years called you in to let you know that your job was being "eliminated" and that your work would be shifted to another, slightly different position. But don't worry, they reassure you; you can apply for one of the new positions — that is, if you can pass a few tests, one of which is a "behavioral test" that includes questions like, "If you lost your job, would you consider suicide?" The behavioral test will help them, your employer explains, to decide if you are the right kind of person for the position with the fancy new corporate title.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 13, 2009
Barbara C. Latrobe, who had worked at Johns Hopkins Hospital for two decades and was a longtime volunteer, died Wednesday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 82. Barbara Caffee, the daughter of a businessman and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Edgevale Road in Roland Park. She was a 1944 graduate of Bryn Mawr School and earned a bachelor's degree from Goucher College in 1949. Mrs. Latrobe was employed briefly at the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, before going to work in the late 1950s at the Johns Hopkins Moore Clinic.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Eager to find highly sought-after medical professionals, University of Maryland Medical Center offered its employees bonuses of up to $5,000 each time they referred an applicant who joined the hospital staff. Paula Anderson, an administrative assistant at the medical center's human resources department, was a good employee and "a team player," a former boss said. But prosecutors said yesterday that greed took over. Anderson was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday to 18 months in prison followed by 12 months of home detention for her role as the ringleader in an elaborate scheme to bilk the referral program.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 17, 2007
At the University of Maryland Medical Center, employees in the competitive world of health care reaped rewards when they recruited new colleagues. Workers could pocket up to $5,000 each time they found an applicant who later became a medical center employee. However, Paula Anderson turned the hunt for new employees into a lucrative crime. Anderson, who worked in the medical center's human resources department, admitted yesterday in federal court in Baltimore that she turned the incentive system on its head.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 6, 2006
A government employees union has called for changes in staffing levels and training at state mental health facilities after the death of a 39-year-old care assistant who was injured Saturday while breaking up a fight at Spring Grove Hospital Center in Catonsville. In a letter to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the union said that workers are not equipped to handle an escalating number of court-referred patients, many of whom are dangerous or have committed serious crimes. Lee McDuffy, a care assistant at Spring Grove, was working a double shift when he broke up a fight between two patients about 8:30 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | July 7, 1992
Sherry Carter took her 4-year-old son, Lavar Clark, to work with her yesterday morning at Baltimore County General Hospital.But Lavar didn't spend the day in the Radiology Department where his mother works as a clerk. Instead, he was across the street at the Randallstown hospital's new day-care center.Known as The Kid's Place, the 9,000-square-foot center opened yesterday and is sponsored by the hospital for its employees. Although located on the grounds of Baltimore County General, the center was constructed by and is owned and operated by the Kid's Place Inc., a Bethesda company with three other centers in the state.
NEWS
November 14, 2005
Leslie Ellen Burke, a former administrative assistant to the directors of Johns Hopkins Children's Center, died of lymphoma Saturday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 56. Leslie Gibberman was born in Baltimore, raised in the upper Park Heights area and graduated in 1956 from Forest Park High School, where she was student council president. She earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1970. Later that year she married Alan Burke and they settled in Mount Washington.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 13, 2004
Three Springfield Hospital Center employees were overcome by fumes yesterday from a pesticide fogger being used inside an enclosed greenhouse, hospital officials said. Two hospital security personnel and a maintenance worker responding to the greenhouse about 12:40 p.m. were overcome by fumes, said Dr. Jonathan Book, clinical director at Springfield. None of the men was wearing protective gear, he said. Hospital employees use the foggers once a month in the greenhouse, Book said, but this time used a different fumigation product, called Plant-Fume.
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