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BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
Maryland hospitals saw more empty beds than usual this spring and summer, raising concern among industry executives. Some hospital executives cautioned that the sharp drop might not be permanent, however, and say it is too soon to conclude that managed care and health care reforms are to blame.Statewide, occupancy dropped 5.1 percent for the quarter that ended June 30 compared with the same period last year, prompting at least two hospitals to lay off employees. Fewer patients, shorter stays, and drops in emergency room use were among the reasons.
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NEWS
November 21, 2012
I am a singer and a rabbi, and I would rather sing to you right now, because you have probably read too many words, heard too much raw speech, about Israel and Gaza. It would be better to soothe and distract. But I feel compelled to find words. Just words. Biblical verses and fragments of songs jostle for recognition and repetition, but I can't hear then clearly enough. Instead, I'm trapped in the compulsion to read every report, go to every website. It feels disrespectful to say that I feel inundated or bombarded by all the words, when there are too many who are actually being bombarded.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 28, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- It's easy to feel lonely on the fourth floor of the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs hospital. The operating rooms appear frozen in their vintage 1952 state. The ceiling paint is peeling. Room after room lies dark, like the cabins of an old battle cruiser.Stride downstairs to the outpatient clinics and a far different scene is unfolding. The rooms are thick with veterans waiting to see their own primary care doctor -- a managed care feature the agency recently added.Nurses are busy working the phones.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | August 29, 2007
The city's 11 hospital emergency rooms continue to be crowded, often too full to accept patients, keeping ambulance crews off the streets where they are needed as they wait for beds to open up. But data released yesterday show that the major logjams of a year ago have not gotten worse -- and in some cases have improved slightly. "It's still a very rough situation on a day-to-day basis," said Dr. Robert Bass, director of the Maryland Institute of Emergency Medical Services Systems. Last year, there were major complaints from Baltimore ambulance crews and others about how slowly patients were being moved through city hospitals.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
PINEVILLE, La. -- For some of society's most vulnerable, a hilly patch of pine forest along this stretch of the Red River in central Louisiana has become a last refuge. More than half of the state's public hospital beds for the severely mentally ill were closed or lost during hurricanes Katrina and Rita, health professionals say, leaving them with few places to turn for treatment. Many have ended up here at Central State Hospital, on the shaded grounds of a century-old psychiatric center.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
A task force made recommendations yesterday to alleviate crowding in Baltimore's hospital emergency departments, saying among other things that hospitals should do more to quickly admit patients. City Health Commissioner Joshua Sharfstein helped assemble the panel of city, state and hospital officials after Fire Chief William J. Goodwin Jr. called him in April, saying he was concerned that ambulances were waiting too long to unload patients outside full hospital emergency rooms. As of last year, the most recent for which figures are available, ambulances were waiting an average of about 44 minutes, the report said.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 7, 2000
If there are too many hospital beds in Maryland, how come they are all full? Putin will get tough with (A) crime, (B) corruption, (C) Chechnya, (D) critics or (E) us. But somebody should tell him to choose one. The state comptroller is part watchdog, part pit bull.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
After years of debate, the state's health planning commission yesterday cleared the way to close Fallston General Hospital and build a $60 million hospital in Bel Air.The plan will "replace an aging facility" and "put services in a county that's growing very rapidly in a location where they can be better utilized," said Lyle E. Sheldon, chief executive of Upper Chesapeake Health System, which will build the hospital. Upper Chesapeake was created in 1987 by the merger of Harford County's two hospitals, Fallston General and Harford Memorial.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
State health planners yesterday projected that Maryland's hospitals, despite recent downsizings to deal with declining occupancy rates, will still have excess capacity of 29 percent to 45 percent by the year 2000.While the problem of excess beds requires attention from regulators, it can be managed, said James R. Stanton, executive director of the Heath Resources Planning Commission, who presented the projections yesterday to the Senate Finance Health Subcommittee. He added, "I encourage you not to focus on the numbers."
NEWS
January 14, 1999
TODAY'S scheduled announcement of Maryland General Hospital's merger into the larger University of Maryland Medical System is a welcome development for residents of downtown Baltimore and for west side redevelopment efforts.This sound business move should strengthen University's health-care system while assuring that two thriving medical centers will anchor renewal along Howard Street.Maryland General is a low-cost, 300-bed community hospital; University is a high-cost, 747-bed teaching and specialty-care facility.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN REPORTER | May 11, 2007
Josephine Hill came home from the hospital in the spring of 2004 unable to climb the stairs to her bedroom. At the recommendation of her doctors, her husband, Ian T. Hill, converted the living room into a bedroom, kept a baby monitor at her side and acquired a hospital bed to keep her more comfortable. The bed, Ian Hill believes, is what killed her. Hill and his three children are suing Johns Hopkins Home Care Group, the company that provided the electric bed, for $10 million. They allege that the bed's motor ignited in August 2004 and caused a fire that fatally burned Josephine Hill, 65, and destroyed their Ellicott City home.
NEWS
By JORGE VALENCIA and JORGE VALENCIA,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
Howard County General Hospital will add a 10-bed mental health unit to its emergency room that will ease admission of involuntary psychiatric patients and improve emergency operations, hospital officials confirmed this week. The $775,000 project is scheduled to begin next week and be completed by January, said Beth Plavner, the hospital's construction consultant. It will be an addition of almost 2,200 square feet and will have three locked rooms and seven cubicles -- expanding the emergency room from 36 adult beds to 46. The unit would be staffed with a nurse and a hospital security guard 24 hours a day, according to Debbie Fleischmann, administrative director of the Emergency Department.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
A task force made recommendations yesterday to alleviate crowding in Baltimore's hospital emergency departments, saying among other things that hospitals should do more to quickly admit patients. City Health Commissioner Joshua Sharfstein helped assemble the panel of city, state and hospital officials after Fire Chief William J. Goodwin Jr. called him in April, saying he was concerned that ambulances were waiting too long to unload patients outside full hospital emergency rooms. As of last year, the most recent for which figures are available, ambulances were waiting an average of about 44 minutes, the report said.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
PINEVILLE, La. -- For some of society's most vulnerable, a hilly patch of pine forest along this stretch of the Red River in central Louisiana has become a last refuge. More than half of the state's public hospital beds for the severely mentally ill were closed or lost during hurricanes Katrina and Rita, health professionals say, leaving them with few places to turn for treatment. Many have ended up here at Central State Hospital, on the shaded grounds of a century-old psychiatric center.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2005
An estimated 2,500 hospitalized patients were waiting yesterday afternoon to be removed from New Orleans as rising floodwaters in the central city forced a general evacuation. Many of the patients were the most critically ill, who could not be readily evacuated over the weekend before Hurricane Katrina struck the city, but others are injured survivors who sought help after the initial impact of the storm on the city. Many of the patients will be taken temporarily to an emergency evacuation center that has been set up on the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, 75 miles northwest of New Orleans.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
Though fears of a flu epidemic have so far gone unrealized, emergency rooms throughout Maryland have been taxed to capacity - and in some cases beyond - by an influx of patients complaining of seasonal illnesses. Dr. Richard L. Alcorta, medical director of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, said hospitals across the state called in extra staff, put up temporary beds in some areas and postponed elective surgeries to deal with the increase in patients with winter ailments.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1996
For more than a century, world-renowned Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital has sheltered famous and not-so-famous mentally ill patients at its bucolic Towson campus -- sometimes for years.But now, payment restrictions imposed by insurance companies and new drug treatments have emptied scores of its hospital beds, trends changing the shape of Sheppard Pratt and other psychiatric institutions around the country.Many hospitals -- from Sheppard Pratt to Menninger in Topeka, Kan., and McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Church Hospital -- Baltimore's second-oldest and the building where Edgar Allan Poe died and Union soldiers wounded on Pratt Street in the beginning of the Civil War were treated -- will close its doors this fall.In the shadow of its world-class neighbor, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Church served the East Baltimore community, particularly the elderly, for 142 years, earning a reputation for caring and homeyness. Over time, however, families that traditionally turned to it began moving to the suburbs, leaving it with empty beds and lower income.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Anne Arundel Medical Center, continuing its rapid growth since moving out of downtown Annapolis three years ago, announced yesterday a $200 million expansion that hospital officials say will add operating rooms, surgical beds and more outpatient space to its campus off U.S. 50. A nine-story addition would be the centerpiece of the expansion, which would also include more parking on the campus, just outside Annapolis. The hospital would also add about 300 full-time workers to its staff of 1,695.
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