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By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Alexander R. "Ruffie" Holmes, a retired certified public accountant who later became treasurer of the old Church Home and Hospital in East Baltimore, died Sunday of complications from dementia at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. He was 90. The son of Dr. James Holmes, a physician, and Rosalie Holmes, a homemaker, Alexander Rutherfoord Holmes was born in Baltimore and raised on Charlesmeade Road and in Stevenson. Growing up, he was a member of Boy Scout Troop 35 at the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer and spent summers as a camper and later as a counselor at Camp Pasquaney in Hebron, N.H. After graduating in 1939 from City College when he was 16, Mr. Holmes earned a bachelor's degree in 1943 from the University of Virginia and graduated two years later from the University of Virginia School of Law. Despite earning a law degree, Mr. Holmes never practiced law. He became a certified public accountant in 1949 and worked for many years for Haskin and Sells, a national accounting firm.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
The Maryland Hospital Association wants to start a foundation that would support projects to care for the uninsured.MHA President Calvin Pierson said the goal of the proposed Maryland Health Care Foundation was to reduce the number of Marylanders who lack health coverage, which has risen from about 650,000 in 1992 to 712,000 in 1995. While state reform of insurance for small employers has brought coverage to tens of thousands of people, Pierson said, others have lost coverage."We know in the economy that a lot of new jobs are low-wage service jobs that don't come with health insurance coverage," he said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
Edwin Charles Saiontz, a highly-regarded health care expert and co-founder of SHR Associates Inc., died Thursday of multiple organ failure at his Boynton Beach, Fla., home. The longtime Pikesville resident was 77. The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, Edwin Charles Saiontz, who was known as Ed, was born in Glen Rock, Pa., and raised in Woodmoor. After graduating from Forest Park High School in 1953, he worked for Nation-Wide Check Corp. in Glen Burnie while studying at night at Baltimore Junior College and later at the University of Baltimore, where he earned a bachelor's degree in business.
NEWS
May 3, 1991
Richard J. Davidson, longtime president of the Maryland Hospital Association, has been selected as the new president of the American Hospital Association.C. Thomas Smith, chairman of the AHA board of trustees, announced the board's decision after a six-month national search yesterday.During his 22 years as president of the Maryland Hospital Association, Mr. Davidson has guided Maryland hospitals through the development of a state hospital rate-setting system and assorted other changes in how hospitals serve their communities.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun Blair Walker of the The Sun's Business staff contributed to this report | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court unanimously upheld yesterday a government rule that will require the nation's private hospitals, with few exceptions, to bargain with up to eight different collections of their workers.Rejecting a claim by hospitals that the National Labor Relations Board has violated its duty to see that there are fewer unions among workers at some 4,000 private institutions, the court said rTC the NLRB had the power to write a broad bargaining unit rule that applies nationwide.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | November 20, 1991
Calvin M. Pierson starts his new job as president of the Maryland Hospital Association upbeat and optimistic.He's concerned about the state's $450 million budget deficit and a resulting $34.4 million in state Medicaid cuts to state hospitals. But Mr. Pierson has dealt with similar problems before. He encountered pretty much the same scenario in Rhode Island, where he headed that state's hospital association before coming to Maryland a few weeks ago."Rhode Island actually went into the recession before the state of Maryland," Mr. Pierson said this week.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | October 8, 1991
The Maryland Hospital Association has selected Rhode Island hospital association President Calvin M. Pierson to replace MHA President Richard J. Davidson, it was announced yesterday.In taking the Maryland job, Mr. Pierson, 44, relinquishes leadership over 17 Rhode Island hospitals to take responsibility for 68 Maryland hospitals under the MHA's aegis. Mr. Pierson, who had been with the Rhode Island association for seven years, assumes his new job Nov. 4."I've always viewed the state of Maryland as a very progressive state which can and does serve as a model for the country in addressing health-care issues," Mr. Pierson said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
Maryland hospitals and the state regulators who set their rates came closer yesterday on a plan to hold down costs -- but the regulators still want to reduce costs, while the hospitals are still proposing a freeze on charges."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
Profit margins at Maryland hospitals, at record levels the past two years, dropped sharply in the fiscal year that ended June 30, according to data from the Maryland Hospital Association.The decline was caused by tightened state controls on hospital rates, claim denials by insurers, cuts in Medicare reimbursements for some services and a drop in patient days, said Nancy Fiedler, senior vice president of the hospital association."The worry has to do with the fact that there doesn't seem to be any indication the downturn is going to change," Fiedler said.
NEWS
September 2, 2010
Regarding the Aug. 29 article on hospital CEO compensation ("Hospital CEO pay is sweet"): Famed management expert Peter Drucker said that health care is the most difficult, chaotic, and complex industry to manage today, and that the hospital is "altogether the most complex human organization ever devised. " Indeed, hospitals are not your typical business. Hospitals are places where lives are saved. They ease pain and suffering. Hospitals are open every minute of every day, driven by a mission of caring and rooted in their communities.
NEWS
June 23, 2009
Md. soldier reported killed in Afghanistan The Pentagon says a soldier from Maryland has been killed in Afghanistan. Spc. Rodrigo A. Munguiarivas, 27, of Germantown died Sunday in Bagram of wounds suffered when his unit was attacked by indirect fire. Munguiarivas, a vehicle driver, was assigned to the 710th Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), in Fort Drum, N.Y. Fort Drum officials said he joined the Army in April 2008 and was deployed in January.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | May 14, 2009
A state regulatory panel approved on Wednesday a 1.77 percent increase in the amount Maryland hospitals can charge their patients - a compromise of sorts between the figure state cost review staff members recommended and what hospitals wanted. The 6-0 vote by Maryland's Health Services Cost Review Commission is expected to translate to higher costs for patients treated in Maryland hospitals, companies that pay for health care costs as part of workers' compensation and insurers. The increase takes effect July 1 and applies for one year to 47 hospitals, employing 88,000 people.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | April 1, 2009
Maryland hospitals say: We want our bailout! Not in so many words, but that's the upshot of last week's Chewbacca-like cry of anguish from the Maryland Hospital Association. "Economic Crisis Hits Maryland Hospitals," said the official statement, launched as the association seeks to push up prices for Marylanders needing hospital treatment. Terrible news, if true. Health and social care make up only about an eighth of the Maryland economy, but they have accounted for well over half of the state's job growth over the past five years.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
Lower-income patients who lack insurance would be guaranteed free care at Maryland hospitals, which also would have to follow consumer-friendly debt-collection policies, under legislation adopted by the House of Delegates on Saturday. The bill would require that hospitals develop a financial assistance policy for uninsured and underinsured patients that includes free care for those with incomes of less than 150 percent of the federal poverty level, or about $33,000 for a family of four.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,james.drew@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley says he supports legislation to correct "abusive billing and collection practices" by some Maryland hospitals, while expanding health care and financial assistance for lower-income patients. The governor spoke Friday in Baltimore as his administration released a report that recommends defining who is eligible for free and reduced-price hospital care, requiring hospitals to provide financial assistance information to all patients, and banning hospitals and their collection agencies from charging the uninsured interest and penalties on bills before court judgments are entered against them.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
After a national search, the Maryland Hospital Association found its new president in Davidsonville. She's Carmela Coyle, currently a senior vice president for policy at the American Hospital Association (AHA). Coyle will become president and chief executive officer of the Maryland association July 1. She will be just the third chief in the association's four-decade history: Founding President Richard J. Davidson had a 22-year tenure before leaving to head the AHA. Calvin Pierson, who has been president for 16 years, announced in October that he would retire in July.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,james.drew@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
Maryland law should be changed so that hospitals are required to provide charity care to more people and give financial-assistance information to all patients, according to the state agency that sets hospital rates. In a report to Gov. Martin O'Malley that will be released today, the Health Services Cost Review Commission recommends several changes to the state's unique rate-setting system, which was designed in part to guarantee all Marylanders hospital care whether they could afford it or not. The commission also recommended that hospitals be required to provide written notice about the availability of financial assistance to all patients before or as they are discharged, and that hospitals and their collection agencies be barred from adding interest and penalties on bills to uninsured patients for periods before court judgments are entered against them.
NEWS
January 3, 2009
Hospitals often wind up with stacks of unpaid bills because of the lack of universal health insurance coverage in this country. And certainly, no one likes to receive a letter or call from a bill collector or go to court over a hospital charge. Yet hospitals can only survive if bills get paid. That was one of several key points missing from The Baltimore Sun's series "In Their Debt" (Dec. 21-23). At the same time, hospitals aren't anxious to litigate. Few disputes make it to court: less than 0.5 percent of all hospital bills.
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