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November 4, 2010
Former Tigers and Reds manager Sparky Anderson , 76, has been placed in hospice care at his Thousand Oaks, Calif., home for complications resulting from dementia. Anderson's family said in a statement Wednesday that they appreciate the support and kindness that friends and fans have shown throughout the Hall of Famer's career and retirement. No further details were released. •After being passed over for the Cubs' managerial job, Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg will not be back with the organization next season, declining an invitation to return to manager at Triple-A Iowa.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Gilchrist Hospice Care, the largest provider of hospice services in the state, said Wednesday it has partnered with Joseph Richey Hospice, which operates the only free-standing residential facility in Baltimore City. Details of the arrangement were not disclosed by the two non-profits, but officials said Joseph Richey will now fall under the Gilchrist umbrella. Joseph Richey provides care to terminally ill patients in underserved communities, and Gilchrist's leadership expected the partnership to enhance care.
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NEWS
April 1, 2010
Archbishop William D. Borders has entered hospice care, a spokesman for the Archdiocese of Baltimore said Wednesday. Borders, 96, spiritual leader of the archdiocese from 1974 to 1989, has been diagnosed with colon cancer. He moved recently from the Mercy Ridge retirement community in Lutherville to the Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien has asked area Catholics for prayers. - Baltimore Sun staff
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | June 4, 2014
The 15th annual Senator Bob Hooper House Hospice Regatta will be held on Saturday, June 7, at the Concord Point Lighthouse in Havre de Grace. All proceeds will benefit the Senator Bob Hooper House, an assisted living community near Bel Air specializing in hospice care and a member of University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health. The regatta raised more than $110,000 last year for hospice services in Harford County. Such services are essential for terminally ill patients and their families, offering support and compassion in dealing with issues associated with end of life care.
NEWS
November 2, 2011
No one likes to think about advanced illness but it's something most of us will have to face eventually. There's an incredible resource in our community that provides comfort, dignity and respect to all those coping with a complex illness. It's Hospice of the Chesapeake. November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month, a time to reach out to our community to raise awareness about the compassionate care that Hospice of the Chesapeake provides. One of the most important messages we convey is that hospice care helps patients and families focus on living.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Gilchrist Hospice Care, the largest provider of hospice services in the state, said Wednesday it has partnered with Joseph Richey Hospice, which operates the only free-standing residential facility in Baltimore City. Details of the arrangement were not disclosed by the two non-profits, but officials said Joseph Richey will now fall under the Gilchrist umbrella. Joseph Richey provides care to terminally ill patients in underserved communities, and Gilchrist's leadership expected the partnership to enhance care.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 1999
I'VE JUST returned from the post office with my first sheet of the new first-class stamp honoring hospice care."The United States Postal Service receives about 40,000 requests a year for commemorative stamps," said Barry Riggins, Annapolis postmaster, "so this is a very selective process. We hope this stamp helps to raise awareness of hospice service."The stamp, introduced to this region Feb. 10, depicts a white house against a background of green trees and lawn. A sweeping path draws you "home."
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Shirley Kane didn't think she could take it any more. Her 87-year-old mother, diagnosed with terminal cancer, was bedridden at home. Kane was the only person feeding her, sorting out her medications, keeping her clean. The job was so overwhelming that she abandoned her own activities, forsook her own health needs and sank into depression. "They say the caregiver goes first," Kane says. "I almost felt like I didn't want to live anymore. " Then the 64-year-old did something studies show is exceptional among her fellow African-Americans.
NEWS
By Kathleen B. Hennelly and Kathleen B. Hennelly,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 6, 1996
Nobody won the advertised $1 million at the Hospice Services of Howard County's hole-in-one contest last weekend, but $13,000 was raised for the nonprofit group based in East Columbia.John Maybee of Ellicott City was among those who paid $1 a ball for a chance at the $1 million. One of his shots dropped straight into the hole in Saturday's semifinals, but he couldn't repeat the feat during Sunday's million-dollar final round."I wish I could reverse the days," said Maybee, a senior engineer at RWD Technologies Inc. and a frequent golfer.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | November 17, 1995
KUDOS TO Charlene Cohen, wife of Greater Baltimore Medical Center's Director of the Cancer Center Dr. Gary Cohen, for doing such a great job chairing the GBMC 30th anniversary Celebration at Camden Yards.She was pleased that despite terrible weather, there was such a good turnout which helped them raise more than $140,000 for the Hospice of Baltimore's new inpatient facility, the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care, scheduled to open next spring.Others who helped with this fund-raiser were Towson attorney and GBMC Foundation Board Member Carolyn Thaler; president the GBMC auxiliary Ellen Hensby; GBMC volunteer Anne Haley, who chaired the silent auction which offered some pretty fabulous items, thanks to help from Diana Clarke and Connie Pitcher.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
I'm writing in response to the letter "Maryland needs Mizeur's death with dignity law" (April 27) by Alan D. Eason. Mr. Eason makes a very controversial statement when he says that "Maryland law should be changed to allow mentally competent, terminally ill adults to legally choose aid in dying when palliative and hospice care can no longer provide, for them, a satisfactory life. " The key phrase is "mentally competent. " A person can be not competent for a certain period of time and then may be competent after the situation subsides, such as any medical crisis.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
I disagree, strongly, with Ms. Catalfamo's letter ( "Assisted suicide is not the answer," April 21), asserting that Del. Heather Mizeur's position on allowing aid in dying in Maryland is "perverted" and inconsistent with "a decent democracy. " For me, and for many other seniors, respect for and support of an individual's end-of-life choices is absolutely central to American principles and values. I believe that most of us are unable to imagine what it is like to suffer from a terminal illness.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Dr. Roy H. Brown, the father of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, died in hospice care in Huntington, N.Y. Thursday. He was 89. Dr. Brown, who battled cancer over the past four months, was surrounded by his wife, Lilly, his children and his family. Lt. Gov. Brown issued a statement Thursday evening, saying: "My father was a man who led by example. He rose out of poverty in Kingston, Jamaica and overcame incredible odds to become a doctor. As a loving husband and father, he worked tirelessly to provide every opportunity for his children.
NEWS
December 23, 2013
Thanks for Jonathan Pitts ' article regarding hospice care ("Urging African-Americans to look at hospice for end of life," Dec. 19). I work on the palliative care service at University of Maryland Medical Center and often encounter resistance to hospice from my African-American patients or families. Community efforts like the one described sound are a wonderful way to help educate people about hospice's many benefits. One suggestion for the future: It may further contribute to confusion about this kind of care to use phrases like "placed in hospice, a health care setting.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Shirley Kane didn't think she could take it any more. Her 87-year-old mother, diagnosed with terminal cancer, was bedridden at home. Kane was the only person feeding her, sorting out her medications, keeping her clean. The job was so overwhelming that she abandoned her own activities, forsook her own health needs and sank into depression. "They say the caregiver goes first," Kane says. "I almost felt like I didn't want to live anymore. " Then the 64-year-old did something studies show is exceptional among her fellow African-Americans.
NEWS
Special to The Aegis | December 9, 2013
Jessica McAllister has joined Brightview Bel Air, a Brightview Senior Living community in Bel Air, as vibrant living director. "We are delighted to have Jessica join our team," Executive Director Jen Bourgeois said in a news release. "Our caring and highly trained associates drive the success of our communities and, together with residents, bring our mission - Live Vibrant - to life each day. " As vibrant living director, McAllister leads the team that provides vibrant programming in the community's assisted living and award winning Wellspring Village neighborhood for memory and Alzheimer's Care.
NEWS
June 20, 2006
On June 14, 2006, BRENDA ESPOSITO sister of Anna Messmer, Ellen Redgate and Philip Esposito, aunt of Kristin, Russell, Patrick, Allessandra and Jared. She was preceded in death by her parents, Vincent and Phyllis Esposito of Great Neck, NY. Contributions may be sent her memory to the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care, 6601 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD, 21204.
NEWS
By Matthew French and Matthew French,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 1, 1997
Hospice of Baltimore and Hospice Services of Howard County recently united their organizations to broaden the Baltimore agency's service to the greater Baltimore area.The Baltimore group is licensed by the state and certified by Medicare to serve residents of Baltimore City and Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties.Hospice Services of Howard County has served county residents for 18 years and will continue to operate from its headquarters in Columbia, providing home-based hospice care. Hospice of Baltimore's Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care will provide inpatient hospice care.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Someone - or some people - tried three times over 14 months in the early 1990s to kill Michael Smoot. This summer, they succeeded when he died from complications of his injuries from those shootings.  According to police, Smoot was at a hospice facility in Baltimore County on June 19 when he died. Detectives learned that he had been shot three times between 1992 and 1993. The first occurred April 29, 1992 in the 2000 block of Barclay Street, when he was 26 years old; the second happened September 16, 1992 in the 400 block of Heaver St. On July 26, 1993, Smoot returned to the 2000 block of Barclay Street and was shot again.  The third shooting required Smoot to seek hospice care, and medical examiners believe ultimately caused his death.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 24, 2013
Joe Shatus' mother died Saturday morning, June 22, the same day that his father died 31 years earlier. Late that afternoon, the retired fundraiser, 67, sat at a patio table outside the market at Belvedere Square. There, 30 people, young and old and from around the region, had gathered for the Baltimore area's first "Death Cafe," a frank, 90-minute discussion with strangers about death and the issues surrounding it. When it ended, Shatus reflected on a day that started with a death in the family and ended with an organized talk about the end of life and the meaning of it all. "It's just strange," said Shatus, of south Baltimore, whose mother, Rose, died of natural causes in hospice care at age 96. "It's kind of reassuring in a way. No one wants to talk about (death)
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