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By Los Angeles Times | February 4, 1994
TOKYO -- In a stunning turnabout, Japanese Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa today abruptly backed down from a tax package proposed just one day earlier to jump start the flagging economy, as furious political backlash threatened to destroy his ruling coalition.Mr. Hosokawa's reversal on plans to enact a $49 billion tax cut and a new welfare tax to finance it came after hours of fruitless negotiations with the Socialists who had threatened to quit the coalition.It underscored a mounting power struggle within his coalition that seems headed toward sweeping political realignments.
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NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 31, 1994
TOKYO -- A suspected right-wing extremist fired a shot yards away from former Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa yesterday in apparent protest over Mr. Hosokowa's open apologies for Japan's actions in World War II.Mr. Hosokawa was not harmed. The bullet hit the ceiling of a Tokyo hotel, where he had spoken at a political party meeting.Security guards quickly tackled the gunman, who was identified as Masakatsu Nozoe, 52. He later told police that he was upset with Mr. Hosokawa's statements on Japan's role during World War II and his economic policies, Japanese news reports said.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa warned the United States yesterday against imposing trade sanctions on Japan after their failed negotiations.His top aides said such action would cause Tokyo to retaliate with sanctions on American products."I very much hope the U.S. will refrain from such action," Mr. Hosokawa told reporters before leaving Washington, a day after the eight-month-long trade negotiations between the United States and Japan collapsed.With U.S. officials already vowing to impose some sort of punitive measure on Japan, now that Japan has refused to accept U.S. demands for more open markets, the world's two biggest economies appeared to be poised on the edge of a trade war.Then, too, there is undoubtedly a lot of posturing going on with the respective warnings, as both sides try to look tough for their domestic audiences, and it is possible that cooler heads will prevail as they approach the brink.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 10, 1994
TOKYO -- Japan's rainbow coalition confronted the threat of a breakup yesterday as leaders of its eight parties failed to agree on policies that a successor to outgoing Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa should follow.Nominally, they promised to choose a new leader from within their ranks and elect him prime minister by the end of this week. But quarrels among themselves belied the credibility of their pledge.Leaders of the Japan Renewal Party and the Buddhist-backed Komei (Clean Government)
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau The New York Times contributed to this article | November 17, 1993
TOKYO -- Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa won his job last summer. He got to keep it yesterday, in a way that moved the country closer to the most dramatic political reform since the end of World War II.Months of back-room negotiations and a final, U.S.-style, brute shove, pushed a political reform package through a critical committee of the lower house of the Diet, Japan's parliament, and on to likely passage by the full body at the end of the...
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
TOKYO -- Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa can look forward to his U.S. sojourn this week for at least one reason: He will be leaving Japan and its increasingly chaotic politics.A country once known for stability has become a political circus. Within the past two weeks, the government has seen its political reform bill killed by coalition members and then revived by the opposition in a less vivid form that was even farther from what the initial supporters had wanted.A critical tax bill suffered the same initial derailment, but today leader's of Mr. Hosokawa's ruling coalition announced settlement of the dispute.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993
Japan weighs cutting regulationsIn its first effort to reduce the government's power over Japan's minutely regulated economy, a commission appointed by Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa yesterday called for the elimination or easing of 475 regulations governing the nation's legal and economic systems.The proposals, which were in an interim report hastily prepared so that Mr. Hosokawa can present it to President Clinton this month at a meeting in Seattle, were ambitious but conspicuous in their lack of details.
NEWS
February 9, 1994
Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa has been sufficiently weakened by political battles he barely survived to make his Friday meeting with President Clinton a probable waste of time. His political and economic reforms riddled by compromise, he hardly seems strong enough to make Japan's interest groups accept numerical goals to measure progress in opening markets to foreign competition.That is the key remaining U.S. demand on Japanese economic restructuring. Mr. Hosokawa's economic stimulus package, just enacted, goes about as far as American firms can expect in boosting Japanese demand for their products and services.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 31, 1994
TOKYO -- A suspected right-wing extremist fired a shot yards away from former Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa yesterday in apparent protest over Mr. Hosokowa's open apologies for Japan's actions in World War II.Mr. Hosokawa was not harmed. The bullet hit the ceiling of a Tokyo hotel, where he had spoken at a political party meeting.Security guards quickly tackled the gunman, who was identified as Masakatsu Nozoe, 52. He later told police that he was upset with Mr. Hosokawa's statements on Japan's role during World War II and his economic policies, Japanese news reports said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 24, 1993
The city parks department quit mowing the grass and calls it ecological enlightenment. Don't try that in your yard or the whole property owners association will be on your neck.Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa talked a good game to Japan's parliament. He won't be there long, so he can afford to say the right thing.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 8, 1994
TOKYO -- Stung by scandals and unable to effectively govern, Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa resigned today, ending a period of extraordinary optimism for political and social change in Japan.Mr. Hosokawa, whose resignation shatters the fragile coalition he has headed since last summer, announced at a press conference at 2:20 a.m. Eastern time that he would step down. During his statement to the press, he said there might be new problems stemming from management of his campaign finances.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service Bloomberg Business News contributed to this article | April 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government released its list yesterday of countries erecting egregious trade barriers, singling out Japan as the worst offender. But senior officials said they were not, for the moment, contemplating any new sanctions against Tokyo.The Clinton administration has decided to give the Japanese more time to flesh out their sketchy offer, made earlier this week, to break the trade deadlock.This restrained response by the administration to a Japanese trade package deemed wholly insufficient is in striking contrast to some of the tough language of recent months.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton PTC and Thomas Easton PTC,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1994
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, who likes to compare himself to President Clinton, now has a Whitewater of his own, revolving around complex deals he was involved in while governor.As with Mr. Clinton, it is difficult to determine culpability, if any.The affair concerns a 1982 loan to Mr. Hosokawa of 100 million yen (then worth about $750,000) from a package delivery firm, Tokyo Sagawa Kyubin, that was subsequently involved in political scandals.The money, Mr. Hosokawa has said, was used to buy a Tokyo apartment and fix up a family estate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa warned the United States yesterday against imposing trade sanctions on Japan after their failed negotiations.His top aides said such action would cause Tokyo to retaliate with sanctions on American products."I very much hope the U.S. will refrain from such action," Mr. Hosokawa told reporters before leaving Washington, a day after the eight-month-long trade negotiations between the United States and Japan collapsed.With U.S. officials already vowing to impose some sort of punitive measure on Japan, now that Japan has refused to accept U.S. demands for more open markets, the world's two biggest economies appeared to be poised on the edge of a trade war.Then, too, there is undoubtedly a lot of posturing going on with the respective warnings, as both sides try to look tough for their domestic audiences, and it is possible that cooler heads will prevail as they approach the brink.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | February 11, 1994
TOKYO -- The 13 hours Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa spent in the air en route to Washington for meetings today with President Clinton may be as good as it gets.Left behind in Tokyo were a crumbling government and a depressed economy. Ahead are difficult, perhaps impossible, trade discussions with the United States over Japan's notoriously closed markets, discussions that, as Mr. Hosokawa reportedly said Wednesday, are "completely stalled."The tough circumstances are in sharp contrast to the situation just three months ago at their last meeting in Seattle.
NEWS
February 9, 1994
Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa has been sufficiently weakened by political battles he barely survived to make his Friday meeting with President Clinton a probable waste of time. His political and economic reforms riddled by compromise, he hardly seems strong enough to make Japan's interest groups accept numerical goals to measure progress in opening markets to foreign competition.That is the key remaining U.S. demand on Japanese economic restructuring. Mr. Hosokawa's economic stimulus package, just enacted, goes about as far as American firms can expect in boosting Japanese demand for their products and services.
NEWS
January 22, 1994
In rejecting political reforms, the Liberal Democratic troglodytes of Japan's House of Councilors or upper house of parliament have not merely canceled the mandate of the August election to the lower house. The political crisis they brought about cripples the government's ability to face the economic crisis, a recession that has seen share and property prices halved in three years. It is now doubtful that Prime Minster Morihiro Hosokawa can bring about the stimulus package he promised.The crisis also cripples Japan's ability to negotiate.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton PTC and Thomas Easton PTC,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1994
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, who likes to compare himself to President Clinton, now has a Whitewater of his own, revolving around complex deals he was involved in while governor.As with Mr. Clinton, it is difficult to determine culpability, if any.The affair concerns a 1982 loan to Mr. Hosokawa of 100 million yen (then worth about $750,000) from a package delivery firm, Tokyo Sagawa Kyubin, that was subsequently involved in political scandals.The money, Mr. Hosokawa has said, was used to buy a Tokyo apartment and fix up a family estate.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
TOKYO -- Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa can look forward to his U.S. sojourn this week for at least one reason: He will be leaving Japan and its increasingly chaotic politics.A country once known for stability has become a political circus. Within the past two weeks, the government has seen its political reform bill killed by coalition members and then revived by the opposition in a less vivid form that was even farther from what the initial supporters had wanted.A critical tax bill suffered the same initial derailment, but today leader's of Mr. Hosokawa's ruling coalition announced settlement of the dispute.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
TOKYO -- A tentative compromise yesterday over an economic stimulus program rescued Japan's shaky coalition government from dissolution.Under the agreement, the coalition agreed to push ahead with a $55 billion reduction in income taxes. The most contentious issue, how to fund the program, was shelved until later.The compromise by coalition leaders opened the way for the approval of a long-awaited spending plan to help Japan out of its economic doldrums. That sent Japan's stock market soaring today.
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