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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | January 23, 1994
Gerard Moudry has been Baltimore's chief horticulturist for so long that he not only knows what plants and flowers lie beneath the January ice at Cylburn Arboretum, but he remembers what lived there decades ago.He knows nearly every tree and shrub on Cylburn's 167 acres by name, having selected hundreds of them for planting, protected them from disease and weeds, pruned them and marveled at them. Like a 70-foot Atlas cedar -- he grew it from seed four decades ago.Cylburn's trees, along with generations of flower beds in parks, the Inner Harbor and at City Hall, will be Mr. Moudry's legacy to Baltimore when he retires this month after 42 years with the city parks -- including 35 as chief horticulturist.
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EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
The flowers are not the only things in bloom at Kroh's Nursery year after year. In fact, this family business has deep roots that continue to grow in this Aberdeen nursery. In 1980, husband and wife, Robert and Mickie Sachs purchased Kroh's Nursery because they wanted to spend the rest of their lives working in a nursery and garden center. And after high school, their son Jeff started working the family business. Today, Jeff runs the day-to-day operations and says, “I started working in the nursery with my parents when I was just 10 years old. I remember holidays and Mother's Day, which are the busiest days of the year for us.” Though Robert and Mickie still work at the nursery today, Jeff Sachs runs the business and has expanded what they offer with custom design/build landscape services including hand crafted stone walls and patios, garden pools and waterfalls, and landscape maintenance.
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FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Cars whiz by like unguided missiles while Bill Vondrasek stands on the median strip of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard surveying a disorderly patch of greenery accented with red, green, blue and yellow blossoms. He's mildly displeased. As the city's chief horticulturist, its flower beds are his domain. "All up and down Martin Luther King on the end paths there are what we call `gateway beds,'" Vondrasek says. "It's a program funded by federal transportation money because this is a gateway into the city, and we want gateways into the city to look nice."
NEWS
May 6, 2007
As reported April 26, 1967, in The Evening Sun: Howard county will dedicate its new $160,000 public library May 5, ending 21 years of wandering library sites. The structure, built on Route 144 two miles west of Ellicott City, is Howard's first stand-alone library. John Yingling, chairman of the building committee, will formally present the library to Mrs. Neville Arrington, chairman of the Library Board. The library will open for business May 7. Close to $75,000 was raised in public subscription, a response that Mr. Yingling said permitted "a complete package" of landscaping, library equipment and roads.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Tulips (above) and hydrangea petals (below) soak up sunlight at the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens of Baltimore. At left, horticulturist Sandy Reagan guides an Easter Lily toward the light.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Tree advocates, disturbed that a project to widen West Main Street will destroy 40 century-old trees, debated the issue with State Highway Administration officials Monday afternoon.The discussion between Wayne Clingan, SHA's district engineer, and about 12 concerned citizens led by Rebecca Orenstein did not reach a conclusion because neither side was willing to relent on their position.Clingan said replacing the streets and pipes as projected would destroy most of the trees' root systems, killing them anyway.
NEWS
May 6, 2007
As reported April 26, 1967, in The Evening Sun: Howard county will dedicate its new $160,000 public library May 5, ending 21 years of wandering library sites. The structure, built on Route 144 two miles west of Ellicott City, is Howard's first stand-alone library. John Yingling, chairman of the building committee, will formally present the library to Mrs. Neville Arrington, chairman of the Library Board. The library will open for business May 7. Close to $75,000 was raised in public subscription, a response that Mr. Yingling said permitted "a complete package" of landscaping, library equipment and roads.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
UNTIL NOV. 13 MAJOLICA EXHIBIT The Informed Surface: Contemporary Majolica is a national invitational exhibit at Baltimore Clayworks, 5707 Smith Ave. The exhibit continues through Nov. 13. Curated by Linda Arbuckle, the show features majolica works by 25 artists from the U.S. and Canada. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; noon to 5 p.m. Sundays. 410-578-1919 or baltimoreclayworks.org. THURSDAY LECTURE AND BOOK-SIGNING Stephen Salney, author of Frances Elkins: Interior Designer, will talk about Elkins' design work, which integrated various periods and styles, and he'll sign copies of his book, 6 p.m. Thursday at Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. $6; $5 seniors; $3 ages under 6. 410-516-0341.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
The crocus is first out, intruding its little herb's head up into winter's darkest hour. But the crocus is only a whisper, a mere bleat against the wind of February.The daffodil is the emphatic song of March, announcing the inevitable rising of spring. Its distinguishing feature is a trumpet. Trumpets symbolize a yearning for glory.The daffodil is gold. Gold hints at elusive treasure and the conquest of the impossible. The daffodil is all these things. That is why it attracts so much attention, especially now when it is bursting along the sidewalks, flaring forth from a thousand crannies of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
The long-languishing and often-overlooked Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens in Druid Hill Park is blossoming again after a major overhaul that took four years and cost $5 million. The imposing Victorian glass palace, closed for repairs since 2000, received truckloads of tropical plants, flowers and palm trees this week to fill its four main display rooms. Renovations of the soaring five-story space, which contains 1.5 acres of indoor gardens surrounded by walls of glass windows, was funded with money from a city bond issue and the state's Program Open Space.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bon-brest and Nancy Jones Bon-brest,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2007
Andy Herman Regional manager TruGreen LandCare, Essex Salary --$65,000 Age --33 Years on the job --10 How he got started --After graduating from Pennsylvania State University with a degree in landscape contracting and horticulture, Herman was recruited by TruGreen to work in Delaware as an assistant supervisor in its commercial landscaping division. He is now a regional manager supervising more than $900,000 in contracts for lawn care, ground maintenance, landscaping and weed removal at businesses.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Tulips (above) and hydrangea petals (below) soak up sunlight at the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens of Baltimore. At left, horticulturist Sandy Reagan guides an Easter Lily toward the light.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | November 9, 2005
Long after William L. Ackerman fell in love with camellias during his horticulture career at the National Arboretum in Washington, the retired botanist is still searching for new ways to make the showy flower grow farther north. "I don't grow Southern [camellia] belles, " the 82-year-old said. "My objective is cold-hardiness." The ancient shrub, Camellia sinensis, is native to China and is known for leaves used in making green and black tea. But Ackerman is more interested in the looks of camellias - and proving they can bloom in colder climates such as the Mid-Atlantic region and coastal New England.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
UNTIL NOV. 13 MAJOLICA EXHIBIT The Informed Surface: Contemporary Majolica is a national invitational exhibit at Baltimore Clayworks, 5707 Smith Ave. The exhibit continues through Nov. 13. Curated by Linda Arbuckle, the show features majolica works by 25 artists from the U.S. and Canada. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; noon to 5 p.m. Sundays. 410-578-1919 or baltimoreclayworks.org. THURSDAY LECTURE AND BOOK-SIGNING Stephen Salney, author of Frances Elkins: Interior Designer, will talk about Elkins' design work, which integrated various periods and styles, and he'll sign copies of his book, 6 p.m. Thursday at Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. $6; $5 seniors; $3 ages under 6. 410-516-0341.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Cars whiz by like unguided missiles while Bill Vondrasek stands on the median strip of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard surveying a disorderly patch of greenery accented with red, green, blue and yellow blossoms. He's mildly displeased. As the city's chief horticulturist, its flower beds are his domain. "All up and down Martin Luther King on the end paths there are what we call `gateway beds,'" Vondrasek says. "It's a program funded by federal transportation money because this is a gateway into the city, and we want gateways into the city to look nice."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2005
Warren Marshall Raymond, a Columbia Association horticulturist and former drummer in several area bands, died of cancer Sunday at his Columbia home. He was 58. Born in Baltimore and raised on Regester Avenue in Idlewylde, he was a 1964 graduate of Towson High School. He attended what was then Catonsville Community College. Mr. Raymond began playing drums at age 9 and worked his way into performing with the Towson-based RaVons, and the Jetsons, which featured 1960s soul tunes. Friends said he answered a newspaper ad that read "drummer wanted."
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 6, 1992
Quietly and unobtrusively, devoid of trumpets, drums and clanging cymbals, the Caves Valley Golf Club has created an identity that is both impeccable and far-reaching. Its reputation is such that in nine months from opening its fairways, the president of the United States and a fairly well-known golfer asked if they could come play. The compliment is without precedent.Never before have such distinguished individuals wanted to see what a new golf course was like and to decide if the plaudits they were hearing could be justified.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
At Fort McHenry, even in winter, Greg McGuire and his platoon have enough work to keep busy from dawn's early light to the twilight's last gleaming.Their orders: to defend the fort against aging, the elements and a human tide that scours every surface, from grass to glass, and compresses the earthworks.The number of visitors always increases as spring approaches, and the fort's National Park Service protectors have mixed emotions about this year's coming invasion."The British were a one-shot deal," says Mr. McGuire, the maintenance chief, but tourism is relentless and "can be an even bigger challenge than what the elements do to the place."
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
The long-languishing and often-overlooked Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens in Druid Hill Park is blossoming again after a major overhaul that took four years and cost $5 million. The imposing Victorian glass palace, closed for repairs since 2000, received truckloads of tropical plants, flowers and palm trees this week to fill its four main display rooms. Renovations of the soaring five-story space, which contains 1.5 acres of indoor gardens surrounded by walls of glass windows, was funded with money from a city bond issue and the state's Program Open Space.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
PRESTON - Rain dribbles down Frank Gouin's yellow waders as he bends to inspect a tiny white bud with the soul of a giant. "This bud here is gone," Gouin says and shuffles sideways to another one. "This is dead, too." And so on down the line for more than 250 buds that contained the last living tissue from the great Wye Oak, which stood for nearly five centuries on the Eastern Shore until it toppled in a violent thunderstorm in June. After pronouncing each death, the horticulturist plucks out a small fluorescent flag from the soil marking the spot in the John S. Ayton Forest Tree Nursery, where he planted the buds last year.
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