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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
Big, weighty things come to mind when you think of Dundalk: steel mills, giant cranes, container ships. Issues such as whether tariffs on foreign steel are good for the country. You don't think of the toothed leaves of the giant ragwort, the sweet aroma of the Hosta plantaginea flower or of such issues as whether a blackberry lily (Belamcanda chinensis) is an aesthetic companion of a balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus). You also wouldn't expect to find Tom Cole, head of the London School of Horticulture and Landscaping at Capel College in England.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 13, 2014
On a drive along Cromwell Bridge Road east of Towson, you'll notice a classic white barn surrounded by a stretch of wooden fencing. Follow the entry drive at Cromwell Valley Park and you'll encounter a modest green sign marked Talmar. Talmar stands for Therapeutic Alternatives of Maryland. It's a nonprofit therapy center where participants get their hands a little dirty during a day's work. Its home is a handful of acres containing rows of flower beds and greenhouses and a 50-hen chicken coop.
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2002
Kurt Bluemel's legs churn past row upon row of grasses, green stalks of various shapes and sizes, with names like Red Baron, Christmas Rose and Sweet Calamine. He brushes a fleshy finger across their tops, then stops. "This is something I brought from the Straits of Magellan," he said, tickling the floppy, teal tendrils. "It doesn't like the summer here, but in the winter, it's the bluest, bluest grass you can imagine. We call it Blue Tango." A 69-year-old Baldwin resident, Bluemel is a kind of Johnny Appleseed of ornamental grasses, whose global search for new species, subsequent cultivation in Maryland and infectious salesmanship have spread all variety of the plumes across North America.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
The focus will be something old, something new on Sunday, June 1, when the Horticultural Society of Maryland hosts its 23rd annual Garden Tour, “From Manor to Modern:  Garden Design in Columbia and Ellicott City.” The tour, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, focuses on one of Howard County's oldest communities, Ellicott City, and one of its more modern and ever-changing, Columbia. This year's walking and driving tour will take visitors to seven private gardens that range from a tranquil arboretum surrounding an 18th century country estate to innovative contemporary gardens tucked away in suburbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 19, 2000
"Tulipomania: The Story of the World's Most Coveted Flower and the Extraordinary Passions It Aroused" (Crown, 273 pages, $23) In the year 1637 in the Dutch Republic, a single tulip bulb sold for 5,200 guilders, more than 20 times the annual family income of a reasonably respectable artisan. Mike Dash has written a lovely book about one of the loveliest of flowers -- and about the madness than can, and did, seize that most rational of human institions: the market. The characters and the horticulture are as richly fascinating as the insane economics.
NEWS
August 5, 1999
In Baltimore CountyPairs of criminals using deception to enter homes of elderlyTOWSON -- Baltimore County police are warning the public about deception crimes targeting the elderly.This year, 20 incidents have been reported in which pairs of criminals posed as contractors, friends of neighbors or lost travelers to enter elderly victims' homes, police said. Once inside, one thief distracted the homeowner while the other stole valuables.Homeowners should report any suspicious people approaching their homes to the police with a description of the person and the car, police said.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | May 11, 1992
Maureen Heffernan, 30, grew up on a farm in Perry, Ohio, and is education coordinator of the American Horticultural Society in Alexandria, Va."I really enjoyed growing organic plants," said Heffernan, who majored in horticulture at Ohio State University in Columbus.Horticulturists are professionals who work with fruit, vegetable, greenhouse and nursery crops and ornamental plants, according to the Labor Department. They're employed as greenhouse managers, landscape architects, retail florists, nursery workers, horticulture therapists and athletic turf specialists.
NEWS
January 3, 1991
Dundalk Community College is offering an ornamental horticulture program which offers classroom learning and hands-on work experience to prepare students for careers in horticulture.DCC's program offers an associate of arts degree and four certificate options in landscape technology, grounds maintenance, greenhouse management and interior plantscaping. Starting in the spring semester, the program will add a course in basic landscape graphics.From Jan. 28 through May 20, two sections of basic landscape graphics will be offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Dundalk campus.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1994
Starting tomorrow, students taking a horticulture course at Anne Arundel Community College will get a chance to find out how labor-intensive ecological gardening can be.Their training ground will be a 1-acre garden on a historic property in Annapolis.During the six-session course, "Gardening Using Ecological Principles," students will learn everything from how to use storm water in gardens to composting, planting waterway buffers and planting trees so they shade houses.The point, said Anne Pearson, director of the Alliance for Sustainable Communities, is to teach people that "green" gardens can be efficient.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
The Carroll County homeowner didn't know what she had, but she knew who could fix it as she anxiously awaited the plant doctor's return to his office."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Jonathon Rondeau, who recently ran an Upper Malboro training center for people with disabilities, has taken the reins at the Family League of Baltimore. Rondeau, who worked most recently as the chief program officer at Melwood Horticultural Training Center, said his initial goals include better using data to measure the effectiveness of the league's work. The nonprofit works to enhance the well being of the city's children, youth and families. "I look forward to working with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, public agencies and the Family League partners to ensure that children, youth and families have equal opportunities to live, learn and grow equipped with the tools and resources they need to go on to college, career and successful lives," Rondeau said in a statement.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Alleyn Wagandt Moore, a gardener who was a judge in national horticultural competitions, died of cancer Nov. 21 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The North Baltimore resident was 92. Born Alleyn Hays Wagandt in Baltimore, she was a great-granddaughter of William James Dickey, the 19th-century textile mill owner. Raised in Catonsville and later on Blythewood Road, she was a 1937 Bryn Mawr School graduate who also earned a bachelor of arts degree at Bryn Mawr College. In 1944, she married Dr. J. Raymond Moore, a dentist who practiced on West University Parkway.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | April 18, 2007
Robin Hessey Master gardener advance training coordinator and assistant state coordinator for the Master Gardener Program Home and Garden Information Center, Ellicott City Salary --$46,000 Age --58 Years on the job --10 How she got started --Prior to working at the Home and Garden Information Center, a state program that is part of the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension, Hessey owned a graphic design and printing company. She decided to sell the business and look for a less stressful job. She began working as a part-time administrator for the Master Gardener Program and, three years later, began working full-time as the advance training coordinator.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2005
A late 18th-century garden was not just a beautiful thing. In those times, the flora around a house was as useful as it was attractive - perhaps more so. At the William Paca House and Garden in Annapolis, a free public talk slated for tomorrow morning will show how heavily a Colonial household relied on its garden - not only for gooseberries, apples and other fruits and vegetables, but for herbs and medicinal remedies. Sassafras and echinacea were big back then as remedies on both sides of the Atlantic, as a stroll through a replanted period garden behind the Paca House shows.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Surrounded by lush plants, Leah Boston picks up a green snip of Swedish ivy. Slowly and carefully, she presses its end into a plastic cell of potting mix. Boston is among about two dozen people propagating and nurturing plants in the greenhouses of the nonprofit Providence Center. The Millersville-based center operates programs for developmentally disabled adults in Anne Arundel County. Tucked down a slope in Arnold, the horticulture workshop is not widely known, though it is one of the 43-year-old Providence Center's oldest and sells plants to the public, said Leslie B. Mathieson, horticulture production manager.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | August 24, 2003
A local garden center recently recommended that I spray aphids with horticultural oil rather than an insecticide. I thought that horticultural oil was only for fruit trees and was only sprayed in the dormant season. Is that true? What was once called dormant oil spray is now generally referred to as horticultural oil. Dormant oil was primarily used during late winter and early spring to control insect pests before they became active. It is still used for that purpose; however, it can be sprayed in all seasons as long as the temperature is above 40 degrees and below 90 degrees.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 1999
A GENEROUS spirit is often seen at this holiday season. One local store has demonstrated its commitment to supporting the education of area students. Six members of the Horticulture Club at Oklahoma Road Middle School were on hand last week to receive an environmental education grant from Wal-Mart. Ben Christensen, Patrick Holler, Amber Nelson, Eric Ritchie, Megan Ruch and Stacey Sears were accompanied by teachers and club advisers Blair Reed, Karen Soltis and Frank Tippett as store manager Christopher Reynolds presented them with a $300 donation.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 13, 2014
On a drive along Cromwell Bridge Road east of Towson, you'll notice a classic white barn surrounded by a stretch of wooden fencing. Follow the entry drive at Cromwell Valley Park and you'll encounter a modest green sign marked Talmar. Talmar stands for Therapeutic Alternatives of Maryland. It's a nonprofit therapy center where participants get their hands a little dirty during a day's work. Its home is a handful of acres containing rows of flower beds and greenhouses and a 50-hen chicken coop.
NEWS
By Carol Stocker and Carol Stocker,Boston Globe | June 22, 2003
Horticulturist Mary Ann McGourty has a slide program on vines that begins with a New Yorker cartoon of a wife standing at the front door while her husband is outside being chased around the house by a runaway vine. She's shouting, "Look out! Here it comes again!" Some vines are invasive and should never be planted. Still, many people like the space-saving attributes and vertical accent that vines can bring to a garden. The trick is to choose the right one. You have to balance your desire for something quick-growing (who likes to wait?
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2002
Kurt Bluemel's legs churn past row upon row of grasses, green stalks of various shapes and sizes, with names like Red Baron, Christmas Rose and Sweet Calamine. He brushes a fleshy finger across their tops, then stops. "This is something I brought from the Straits of Magellan," he said, tickling the floppy, teal tendrils. "It doesn't like the summer here, but in the winter, it's the bluest, bluest grass you can imagine. We call it Blue Tango." A 69-year-old Baldwin resident, Bluemel is a kind of Johnny Appleseed of ornamental grasses, whose global search for new species, subsequent cultivation in Maryland and infectious salesmanship have spread all variety of the plumes across North America.
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