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NEWS
May 30, 2014
The focus will be something old, something new on Sunday, June 1, when the Horticultural Society of Maryland hosts its 23rd annual Garden Tour, “From Manor to Modern:  Garden Design in Columbia and Ellicott City.” The tour, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, focuses on one of Howard County's oldest communities, Ellicott City, and one of its more modern and ever-changing, Columbia. This year's walking and driving tour will take visitors to seven private gardens that range from a tranquil arboretum surrounding an 18th century country estate to innovative contemporary gardens tucked away in suburbia.
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NEWS
May 30, 2014
The focus will be something old, something new on Sunday, June 1, when the Horticultural Society of Maryland hosts its 23rd annual Garden Tour, “From Manor to Modern:  Garden Design in Columbia and Ellicott City.” The tour, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, focuses on one of Howard County's oldest communities, Ellicott City, and one of its more modern and ever-changing, Columbia. This year's walking and driving tour will take visitors to seven private gardens that range from a tranquil arboretum surrounding an 18th century country estate to innovative contemporary gardens tucked away in suburbia.
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NEWS
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to the Sun | April 9, 2000
There are many ways to become a successful gardener. Find a mentor who will have the time and patience to teach you about such essentials as plants, soil, the effects of various kinds of weather on different plants, garden design, how to use color and texture in the garden, and much more. This will only take a lifetime, and your mentor might have other commitments. You can of course read books, but which ones? Garden clubs, if one invites you to join, are helpful too, but a thorough and focused way to learn about gardening is to join a horticultural society.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
Doris W. Brumback, an avid gardener who assisted in the rejuvenation of Cylburn Arboretum in the 1970s and 1980s, died Jan. 18 of congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Homeland resident was 92. The daughter of a pharmacist and a homemaker, Doris Weltner was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. After graduating in 1936 from Girls' Latin School, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1940 from Goucher College. During the 1940s, Mrs, Brumback worked for American Airlines.
NEWS
June 22, 1992
A memorial service for Albert F. Vierheller, a retired horticultural specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Maryland and an expert on fruit growing, will be held at 7:30 tonight at Riverdale Presbyterian Church in University Park.Mr. Vierheller, who was 98, lived in a nursing home in Lanham. He died June 5 of heart and lung ailments at Doctors Community Hospital of Prince George's County.He retired in 1960, having joined the University of Maryland faculty in 1921 as an instructor of World War I veterans.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | November 15, 1992
Q: Six of us would like to rent a van for three weeks in Europe, visiting the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, France and Switzerland. Is a van available?A: Through one rental company or another, there are vans available in all the countries you plan to visit. For a party your size, a van that holds nine passengers would be most comfortable if you were taking luggage for all of you, rental companies say. When planning your trip, you might want to compare costs for picking up and dropping off a van in each of the countries.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Like many gardeners, Sally Barker didn't become interested in gardening until her kids were grown. When her boys left home about 15 years ago, she looked at her back yard and decided the skateboarding ramp would have to go and that it was time to tackle the tangle of vines and weeds. "We had to do a big clean," she says. Drawing inspiration from friends, she began her gardening adventure by planting a single Shasta viburnum. She was so pleased with the results, she kept digging and planting.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
Doris W. Brumback, an avid gardener who assisted in the rejuvenation of Cylburn Arboretum in the 1970s and 1980s, died Jan. 18 of congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Homeland resident was 92. The daughter of a pharmacist and a homemaker, Doris Weltner was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. After graduating in 1936 from Girls' Latin School, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1940 from Goucher College. During the 1940s, Mrs, Brumback worked for American Airlines.
FEATURES
By Jill R. Yesko and Jill R. Yesko,Special to The Sun | March 6, 1994
Pennsylvanians were probably not surprised when Punxsatawney Phil, the forecasting groundhog, predicted another six weeks of wintry weather. However, spring is already in the air as the 165th edition of the Philadelphia Flower Show begins its weeklong run today. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, it is billed as the world's largest indoor garden show, with nearly 1,700 entries expected in 583 artistic and horticultural competitive classes.This year's show -- with its "Island in the Sun" theme -- is a lush creation of tropical floral vignettes.
NEWS
June 22, 1992
Albert Vierheller, pioneering horticulturistA memorial service for Albert F. Vierheller, a retired horticultural specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Maryland and an expert on fruit growing, will be held at 7:30 tonight at Riverdale Presbyterian Church in University Park.Mr. Vierheller, who was 98, lived in a nursing home in Lanham. He died June 5 of heart and lung ailments at Doctors Community Hospital of Prince George's County.He retired in 1960, having joined the University of Maryland faculty in 1921 as an instructor of World War I veterans.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Like many gardeners, Sally Barker didn't become interested in gardening until her kids were grown. When her boys left home about 15 years ago, she looked at her back yard and decided the skateboarding ramp would have to go and that it was time to tackle the tangle of vines and weeds. "We had to do a big clean," she says. Drawing inspiration from friends, she began her gardening adventure by planting a single Shasta viburnum. She was so pleased with the results, she kept digging and planting.
TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer and By Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | February 9, 2003
Just when it seems that winter will never end, when it seems as if the cold grayness will never lift and the world will never bloom again, then comes the Philadelphia Flower Show. For the past 174 years, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has been filling a cavernous arena in the city with millions of flowers, creating not just a late-winter oasis of greenery, but a magical place of beauty and imagination. "It is a spectacle," said Bartie Cole of Green-spring Valley, purveyor of an extraordinary garden of her own, who has been going to the flower show every year for more than a decade.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to the Sun | April 9, 2000
There are many ways to become a successful gardener. Find a mentor who will have the time and patience to teach you about such essentials as plants, soil, the effects of various kinds of weather on different plants, garden design, how to use color and texture in the garden, and much more. This will only take a lifetime, and your mentor might have other commitments. You can of course read books, but which ones? Garden clubs, if one invites you to join, are helpful too, but a thorough and focused way to learn about gardening is to join a horticultural society.
FEATURES
By Jill R. Yesko and Jill R. Yesko,Special to The Sun | March 6, 1994
Pennsylvanians were probably not surprised when Punxsatawney Phil, the forecasting groundhog, predicted another six weeks of wintry weather. However, spring is already in the air as the 165th edition of the Philadelphia Flower Show begins its weeklong run today. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, it is billed as the world's largest indoor garden show, with nearly 1,700 entries expected in 583 artistic and horticultural competitive classes.This year's show -- with its "Island in the Sun" theme -- is a lush creation of tropical floral vignettes.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | November 15, 1992
Q: Six of us would like to rent a van for three weeks in Europe, visiting the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, France and Switzerland. Is a van available?A: Through one rental company or another, there are vans available in all the countries you plan to visit. For a party your size, a van that holds nine passengers would be most comfortable if you were taking luggage for all of you, rental companies say. When planning your trip, you might want to compare costs for picking up and dropping off a van in each of the countries.
NEWS
June 22, 1992
A memorial service for Albert F. Vierheller, a retired horticultural specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Maryland and an expert on fruit growing, will be held at 7:30 tonight at Riverdale Presbyterian Church in University Park.Mr. Vierheller, who was 98, lived in a nursing home in Lanham. He died June 5 of heart and lung ailments at Doctors Community Hospital of Prince George's County.He retired in 1960, having joined the University of Maryland faculty in 1921 as an instructor of World War I veterans.
TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer and By Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | February 9, 2003
Just when it seems that winter will never end, when it seems as if the cold grayness will never lift and the world will never bloom again, then comes the Philadelphia Flower Show. For the past 174 years, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has been filling a cavernous arena in the city with millions of flowers, creating not just a late-winter oasis of greenery, but a magical place of beauty and imagination. "It is a spectacle," said Bartie Cole of Green-spring Valley, purveyor of an extraordinary garden of her own, who has been going to the flower show every year for more than a decade.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 19, 1992
A salmon pink rose has been named after Julie Andrews, who portrayed the flower seller Eliza Doolittle in the original stage production of "My Fair Lady."Ms. Andrews said yesterday she was "ever so flattered" to be honored at the Chelsea Flower Show in London, which opens today sponsored by the Royal Horticultural Society.Ms. Andrews, who attended a preview of the show, said $1.80 from each "Julie Andrews" rose sold will be given to the Julie Andrews Appeal to fight arterial disease.The show marks the beginning of the British social season.
NEWS
June 22, 1992
Albert Vierheller, pioneering horticulturistA memorial service for Albert F. Vierheller, a retired horticultural specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Maryland and an expert on fruit growing, will be held at 7:30 tonight at Riverdale Presbyterian Church in University Park.Mr. Vierheller, who was 98, lived in a nursing home in Lanham. He died June 5 of heart and lung ailments at Doctors Community Hospital of Prince George's County.He retired in 1960, having joined the University of Maryland faculty in 1921 as an instructor of World War I veterans.
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