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NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | August 12, 1997
AFTER A morning of beachcombing on Delaware Bay, the news brief jumped out at me from the local paper. New Jersey was extending restrictions on catching crabs -- horseshoe crabs.Good news, I thought, having found noticeably fewer of these primordial creatures on the ocean's edge and along the bays.New Jersey's reason was not only to save the Limulus polyphemus itself, but to assure a food supply for shorebirds with the eggs of these marine animals.Since horseshoe crabs have been around for a half-billion years, nearly a tenth of the currently estimated age of planet Earth, they have obviously developed sufficient protections to deal with these ancient avian predators and survive.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Horseshoe Baltimore Casino will host a hiring event at M&T Bank Stadium on Monday and Tuesday for local residents interested in becoming table games dealers. Those selected as potential employees will be offered a free course in card dealing through a partnership with Baltimore City Community College, said Alex Dixon, the casino's vice president and assistant general manager. "Really, what we're looking for is attitude — people with an upbeat and positive attitude. That's the most important thing," Dixon said.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 1, 2012
With another spawning season about to begin, horseshoe crabs appear to be hanging on in Maryland's coastal bays, despite limited habitat for their annual reproductive reunion. Volunteers tallied 23,105 crabs last year, roughly the same number counted in 2010, the Maryland Coastal Bays Program reports. The annual horseshoe crab spawning congregation on the Delaware shore is closely watched, because the ancient sea animals' eggs provide food for shorebirds, particularly red knots , which stop over there to rest and refuel during an epic 9,000-mile migration north.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
The thud of nail guns and screech of drills echoed inside the cavernous shell of exposed cement, silver ventilation shafts and metal framing of the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore rising on Russell Street. As cement trucks rumbled over stubborn patches of ice outside, Chad Barnhill, the casino's general manager, showed off what will be the 122,000-square-foot, two-story casino floor. The work to raise the city's first and only casino is "progressing along very well" and is "on pace" for an August or September opening, despite the recent foul weather, Barnhill said.
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,Contributing Writer | July 17, 1995
The horseshoe that catcher Greg Zaun rubs for luck before each game may need a good polishing after the Orioles' weeklong road trip.Starting catcher Chris Hoiles left Saturday's game with a strained left hamstring and did not play yesterday. The Orioles will know more about Hoiles' status later today.However, even if Hoiles is not put on the disabled list, his playing status will remain iffy. Either way, Zaun figures to get more work."This is something I've wanted all of my life," Zaun said.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | June 30, 2007
SLAUGHTER BEACH, DEL. -- This time of year, the horseshoe crabs practically have the place to themselves. With only a sunbather and a smattering of greenhead flies in the distance, the spiderlike creatures mate undisturbed on the sandy shores. But just a few miles away sits what the crab's protectors consider a major threat to a species that is older than dinosaurs - Charlie Auman, a waterman who has spent much of his adult life catching horseshoe crabs and selling them for bait. For the past decade, Delaware officials have been pushing to protect the crabs, which swim into the bay each spring from the ocean and mate by the millions on its shores.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
The "Dream Team" lost its first match.Don't remember this scenario during the endless Summer Olympic telecasts? Well, you shouldn't. This isn't the U.S. basketball team that won the gold medal during the Olympics.This is the Dream Team of horseshoe pitching. And it was playing for the Special Olympics, not in the Summer Games.The 11th annual Horseshoe Tournament in Winfield brought out 56 two-person teams yesterday in search of that all-important ringer -- the high-scoring throw that leaves the horseshoe's sides around the metal peg -- and to raise money for the county's Special Olympics, an athletic event for the disabled.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS - If Baltimore football fans were waiting for their counterparts in Indiana to do the right thing, their patience was not rewarded. The Indianapolis Colts are not going to change their name, and local sympathy only goes so far for the city that the horseshoe used to call home.Walk down any street. Stop in any sports bar. You'll hear the same thing. This is Colts country now. It has been 12 years since the team slipped out of Baltimore under the cover of night and to hear these Hoosiers tell it it's time for Marylanders to get on with their lives.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
EVEN AS THE Northern Hemisphere approaches its shortest day of the year (Dec. 21) and winter begins to grip the East Coast in earnest, one of spring's great exuberances is taking form in the coastal ocean between Maryland and New Jersey.By the hundreds of thousands, perhaps the millions, horseshoe crabs are beginning to mass along the sea bottom for the long, slow crawl into Delaware and Chesapeake bays to spawn.It is a spectacle to behold, especially in Delaware Bay, where up to a million of the ancient, helmeted creatures emerge on the beaches in May and June.
NEWS
May 28, 1995
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is looking for volunteers to check beaches for horseshoe crabs starting Monday.The crabs, one of the oldest surviving species, have started spawning in the sand.The number of horseshoe crabs has dropped severely since the early part of the century when too many were harvested for fertilizer and animal food.The department has proposed dredging restrictions and further study of their habits and habitat.Peak spawning times are high tides during the next few full moons.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Su | February 22, 2014
The gleaming new Horseshoe Casino Baltimore that greets visitors entering the city on Russell Street rises from gritty surroundings, flanked by a Holiday Inn Express and a concrete bunker-like block of storage units. Those two neighboring properties tell different stories about the possibility of a casino-powered transformation of the gas station-lined corridor, which links the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Interstate 95 with M&T Bank Stadium, Camden Yards and downtown. The hotel owners and others say the $442 million casino will put the Carroll Camden section of South Baltimore on the map and hope it will bring spillover development to the largely industrial area.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Horseshoe Baltimore's local hiring efforts go far beyond what other major companies have done in the city, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said this week. "I don't know that it's ever happened at this level," she said of the casino's effort to hire Baltimore residents. "It's something we've been pushing for, and we're very pleased that Horseshoe understands how important it is to do a significant amount of outreach. " The company has committed to citywide outreach efforts to inform residents of job opportunities at the casino.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Efforts have begun in Baltimore to prepare the city's workforce for about 1,700 jobs that are expected to arrive with the late-summer opening of the Horseshoe Casino on Russell Street. City Councilman Carl Stokes will host a jobs fair with Horseshoe officials on Feb. 5, at which interested applicants will be able to submit their applications and ask about job openings. At the event, to be held in the Oliver Community Association building at 1400 East Federal St., officials will look for "job applicants in every category from accountants to customer service representatives," an event announcement said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A federal lawsuit alleging the Baltimore harbor is being polluted by the city-backed construction of the Horseshoe Casino has been dismissed. U.S. District Court Judge Richard D. Bennett ruled that the city resident who sued lacked legal standing to bring the case. Mark E. Richardson and another man filed suit in July accusing the city of violating the federal Clean Water Act by allowing toxic chemicals to leach into the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River from the city-owned former chemical plant site on which the casino is being built.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Four longtime gaming industry players were named Tuesday to help direct Baltimore's new Horseshoe Casino, filling out the majority of the leadership team for the Russell Street facility as it nears its 2014 start date. Three of the men previously worked for Horseshoe or Caesars Entertainment, the parent company for Horseshoe, Horseshoe Baltimore General Manager Chad Barnhill said in a statement. Brian Carr , the new vice president of finance, worked for Caesars in Illinois, New Jersey and Louisiana; Noah Hirsch, the new vice president of marketing, worked at Horseshoe Cleveland; and Mike Forster, the new director of video lottery terminals, worked for Caesars for 10 years, most recently in Northeast Ohio.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
A new lawsuit has been filed in U.S. District Court over the construction of the Horseshoe Casino, this one accusing the city of violating the federal Clean Water Act by letting contaminants from the former chemical factory and industrial site seep into the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River. The suit, filed Tuesday on behalf of two men who claim to use and enjoy the river, asks the court to order the city to stop the pollution. But the pair, Edward J. Myers of Glen Burnie and Mark E. Richardson of Federal Hill, seek only nominal monetary damages of just $1 plus 10 cents per day for every violation the court finds.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1997
Ula Clyde Collison was never at a loss for words or things to do. There was always a joke to tell or a horseshoe to pitch; a flower to plant or yarn to spin; a prank to pull or game to umpire. He could do them all with the best of them.Mr. Collison, 88, died Saturday of heart failure, said his daughter, Barbara Lamar Moyer of Guam. He suffered from Parkinson's disease and apparently became disoriented and fell down an embankment near his Annapolis home.An athlete and Annapolis sports legend for more than 40 years, Mr. Collison's accomplishments include four decades of coaching youth sports; perennial all-star in the city's adult fast-pitch softball league; horseshoe champion; and golfing gold-medal winner.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | August 11, 1994
There is one person in the United States of America who is excited about the baseball strike that approaches like a thunderhead, threatening to wash out an entire season.One person in the country who is not sorry to see pitches traded in for pickets.One person who sees the light in the impending darkness."Let me put it this way," Jim Speros was saying before last night's professional football game at Memorial Stadium, "they may be trying to take away the name of my team, but they can't take away the luck of that horseshoe."
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Moving to Maryland has been a learning experience for Chad Barnhill, general manager of the Horseshoe Baltimore Casino that will fill the sweeping vacant lot currently greeting drivers coming into the city on Russell Street. At home within the walls of a casino - he's worked for Caesars Entertainment since graduating from college in 1994 - this is the first time he's overseen the building of a new facility. When he's not meeting with city officials regarding building permits, he's addressing neighborhood associations concerned about what plopping a casino near their houses might mean.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Baltimore will hire a recruitment coordinator to look for city residents who can help fill the 1,700 jobs expected to be created by the construction and operation of the new casino. The city's Board of Estimates authorized the temporary position Wednesday. It will pay up to $60,000, plus benefits, for 12 months of work. The position is being funded by the casino operators, a subsidiary of Caesars Entertainment. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said the agreement with the casino, expected to open next year along Russell Street near the stadiums, represents a "commitment to make local residents aware of and give them access to the casino's jobs.
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