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By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 7, 2011
Ever dreamed of owning a Kentucky Derby horse? Plenty of people have, but the buy-in price typically scares them off. Still, if you catch a horse at auction at the right time, and if you have the right eye to identify talent, you can do it without completely emptying your checkbook. Bloodhorse,com, a website that covers the horse racing industry as well as any publication out there, published a list this week showing all the prices the qualifiers for the Kentucky Derby field fetched at auction (at least those that were ever offered for public auction)
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NEWS
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Sidney Anne Willson, a stellar multisport athlete who went on to help her son run a horse-breeding farm in Howard County, died in her sleep Tuesday of natural causes at Shady Grove Center in Rockville. She was 87. In addition to tennis, a sport in which she won tournaments all along the East Coast during the 1940s and 1950s, the former Sidney Adams played lacrosse and, after taking it up in middle age, excelled in golf. "I have never beaten her in golf my entire life," said her son, Art Willson, of Woodbine.
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NEWS
May 3, 2010
Red roses, mint juleps, celebrities and the wealthy stylishly attired: The Kentucky Derby will once again prove itself the highlight of the horse racing season. But the glamour to be seen Saturday in Louisville masked the more telling "Hollywood" allure that's increasingly making horses and races the most irrelevant feature of tracks. Penn National Gaming announced recently that Charles Town Races and Slots in Charles Town, W.Va., will henceforth be known as the Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Prime pieces of farmland like this one on the auction block in northern Baltimore County are few and far between. Ideally situated among the rolling hills of Maryland's horse country, 4101 Butler Road in Glyndon is a 189-acre, horseshoe-shaped estate adjacent to Sagamore Farm, the well-known thoroughbred horse breeding center. A completely renovated, 304-year-old farmhouse, with three bedrooms and three bathrooms, is nestled on the property. The current owners farm out portions of the land for soybean and hay. There is also a one-bedroom cottage on a 1-plus-acre building site.
NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post | May 23, 2010
No. 9 is a tall, rangy horse familiar with people but a good 300 pounds underweight. His ribs protrude beneath his skin. He has no fat on his body and little muscle, and he is in the last stages of starvation. In a stall across from him stands No. 26, an emaciated bay gelding with probable stomach parasites. He watches over No. 17, a skittish 6-month-old filly in the next stall that flinches at an extended hand. Outside, in a pasture, there's No. 3, another skinny horse, with an abscessed tooth, and several other horses that have had so little contact with people that they're virtually wild.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Early in "War Horse," the much-celebrated play now at the Hippodrome, a British farm boy named Albert tries to befriend Joey, a foal that his father bought with money intended for a mortgage payment. The anxious animal keeps his distance, but Albert is determined to breach the divide. After several attempts, the boy holds some feed behind his back, and the wary Joey slowly approaches. The whole scene produces a rare kind of theatrical magic, enough to make you quickly forget that the foal is a puppet operated by three humans, two inside and one out. If that moment, with all its charm and innocence, doesn't get to you, doesn't tug at whatever heartstrings you have, you may be in for a very uncomfortable ride.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
More than 35 horses, cows, bulls and goats rescued in near-starving condition Thursday from a Garrett County farm have been taken to farms in western Howard County. The horses, which were taken to Days End Rescue Farm in Woodbine, are straining the ability of that facility to care for them. Days End took 26 horses, according to Sue Mitchell, development director for the mostly volunteer, 58-acre farm off Frederick Road, and a farm across the street took the cows, bulls and goats temporarily, she said.
EXPLORE
March 15, 2013
There appears to be yet another reality check for those who thought that casino gambling would save horse racing in Maryland: twice as many horses were euthanized at Maryland race tracks last year (21) as in the previous year. Apparently track conditions and animal care regimens have not changed;  speculation is that with slot gambling responsible for larger purses, more horses are being raced in less than perfect condition. Casino gambling was supposed to be the panacea for Maryland's woes. Yet we have new and higher taxes, and now the animals are paying, too.  Marjorie Schulenburg Laurel
NEWS
December 1, 2010
I attended the Preakness many times when I was younger, but I won't mourn the death of Maryland horse racing one bit now that I realized how inhumane horse racing is ( "Preakness at risk," Nov. 30). People often accuse Orioles players of steroid use, and sometimes rightfully so, but racetracks are virtual crack houses compared to baseball fields. Horses are given drugs, both legal and illegal, to mask pain and injuries and make them run faster. Many horses are forced to race on hard surfaces and suffer from chronic foot problems as a result.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Four horses, five ponies and three goats suffering from various levels of emaciation were removed from a property in Severn this week, according to the Anne Arundel County Police Department. Animal Control officials have been investigating the property since January, when they received an anonymous complaint about a dead horse on the property, said Robin Small, Animal Control administrator. At that time, one dead horse and two dead baby goats were removed, and three ponies were turned over to a rescue organization, police said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Elizabeth M. Solter, an accomplished equestrian and teacher who had been a member of the U.S. Equestrian Team and went on to a successful career as a rider, died Sept. 12 of breast cancer at Amberly Farms, her farm in Berlin, Worcester County. She was 47. "I saw Elizabeth come up through the ranks and hit the heights, and it was a joy to watch. She just had natural ability," said Tommy Serio, one of the top riders and trainers in the country, who was a longtime friend and competitor.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
In 1936, the owners of Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore built a manor home on more than 54 acres in Howard County that once belonged to the descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. That property at 3925 Folly Quarter Road in Ellicott City is now for sale for $7 million. "I call this one of the prime, principal properties of Howard County, sitting on one of the highest elevations there," said listing agent Creig Northrop, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate.
NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
On a sunny summer day, 14-year-old Julianna Lupacchino is riding a horse on a Fallston farm. At first glance, the scene seems like nothing special - Harford County is horse country, after all - but at Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding, the occasion is very special indeed; Julianna more frequently uses a wheelchair. Julianna is one of 23 therapeutic riding clients at Chesapeake, where trained staff, volunteers and medical professionals use horses to facilitate physical and mental therapy.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 21, 2014
Horse racing State Fair meet runs Friday to Labor Day The second season of horse racing in Maryland begins Friday with nine races at the Maryland State Fair, the only fair east of the Mississippi that still conducts a sanctioned thoroughbred meeting. The meet covers seven days and will be contested over successive weekends, ending Labor Day. Laurel Park's fall meeting starts Sept. 5. Last year J.D. Acosta accepted 60 mounts at the fair and led riders with 16 wins. He has six mounts Friday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Howard M. "Smitty" Smith, who had owned and operated a Baltimore County horse transportation business, died July 31 of heart failure at Winter Haven Hospital in Winter Haven, Fla. He was 83. The son of Howard Smith, a factory worker, and Katherine Smith, a homemaker, Howard Milton Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in a mill house on Ash Street in Hampden. He attended city public and vocational schools and went to work in 1950 as a mover for Hampden Moving and Storage Co. on Falls Road.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | August 7, 2014
Destinations Years ago when I interviewed Olympian equestrian Joe Fargis who said he had a horse ranch in Middleburg, Va. Without looking it up on the map, I assumed it was a few hours away. A few weeks ago, I drove there and found out it's only a 45-minute drive; but once I got there, I did feel like I was hours away from Beltway and city traffic, hectic work schedules and deadlines. My destination was the 340-acre Salamander Resort and Spa, which opened August 2013 in Middleburg and is definitely designed for relaxation.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
Dressed in her riding togs, Abby Mahoney-Cloutier, 10, took one brief look around the familiar barn, with the horses peering out of their stalls, and burst into sobs. Overwhelmed by fear, the autistic child flailed at the walls. Joan Marie Twining, Abby's riding instructor for the past year, put her arm around the wiry young girl and spoke in soft, assuring tones. With Abby now subdued, Twining walked her to a tethered horse named Izzy and handed the child a brush. Talking to Izzy in the same gentle tones she had just heard, Abby groomed the horse she considers her own. "I know you are liking that," she whispered in Izzy's ear. Watching from the side, Abby's mother says she has often seen her daughter's mood transformed at Twining's Rose of Sharon Equestrian School from inconsolable to confident.
FEATURES
September 29, 1990
Call Charles Lamb's record a streak of luck. As racing editor for the now-deceased Baltimore News American, Lamb correctly predicted in print the winning horses in all 10 races in a single day at Delaware Park.The "streak" came to pass on July 28, 1974, and it's never been beaten, at least not according to the Guiness Book of World Records, which lists Lamb as "Topmost Tipster."Not only did Lamb's published picks match every winner on the 10-race card in Wilmington that day, he also correctly predicted all three exactas and both triples.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
For longer than the U.S. has been a nation, Marylanders have been horse people. George Washington raced thoroughbred horses in Annapolis in the 1750s, 100 years after the animals were first introduced to the area. A statue of Casimir Pulaski, a Polish soldier who assisted in the founding of the American cavalry during the Revolutionary War, stands in Patterson Park. The Preakness Stakes has been run since 1875. In the 1900s, lifeguards patrolled the shores of Ocean City on horseback, looking for shipwrecks and lost swimmers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Alice S. Lumpkin, an environmentalist and animal lover who with her husband owned and managed their Worthington Valley farm, died Saturday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 52. The daughter of Dr. Samuel McComb Lumpkin, an ear, nose and throat specialist, and Barbara Seney Waters Lumpkin, a homemaker, Alice Seney Lumpkin was born in Baltimore and raised in Sparks and on Geist Road in Glyndon. After graduating in 1979 from Garrison Forest School, she earned a bachelor's degree in geology with an environmental option from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, in 1984.
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