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By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 7, 2011
Ever dreamed of owning a Kentucky Derby horse? Plenty of people have, but the buy-in price typically scares them off. Still, if you catch a horse at auction at the right time, and if you have the right eye to identify talent, you can do it without completely emptying your checkbook. Bloodhorse,com, a website that covers the horse racing industry as well as any publication out there, published a list this week showing all the prices the qualifiers for the Kentucky Derby field fetched at auction (at least those that were ever offered for public auction)
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
For longer than the U.S. has been a nation, Marylanders have been horse people. George Washington raced thoroughbred horses in Annapolis in the 1750s, 100 years after the animals were first introduced to the area. A statue of Casimir Pulaski, a Polish soldier who assisted in the founding of the American cavalry during the Revolutionary War, stands in Patterson Park. The Preakness Stakes has been run since 1875. In the 1900s, lifeguards patrolled the shores of Ocean City on horseback, looking for shipwrecks and lost swimmers.
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NEWS
May 3, 2010
Red roses, mint juleps, celebrities and the wealthy stylishly attired: The Kentucky Derby will once again prove itself the highlight of the horse racing season. But the glamour to be seen Saturday in Louisville masked the more telling "Hollywood" allure that's increasingly making horses and races the most irrelevant feature of tracks. Penn National Gaming announced recently that Charles Town Races and Slots in Charles Town, W.Va., will henceforth be known as the Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Alice S. Lumpkin, an environmentalist and animal lover who with her husband owned and managed their Worthington Valley farm, died Saturday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 52. The daughter of Dr. Samuel McComb Lumpkin, an ear, nose and throat specialist, and Barbara Seney Waters Lumpkin, a homemaker, Alice Seney Lumpkin was born in Baltimore and raised in Sparks and on Geist Road in Glyndon. After graduating in 1979 from Garrison Forest School, she earned a bachelor's degree in geology with an environmental option from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, in 1984.
NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post | May 23, 2010
No. 9 is a tall, rangy horse familiar with people but a good 300 pounds underweight. His ribs protrude beneath his skin. He has no fat on his body and little muscle, and he is in the last stages of starvation. In a stall across from him stands No. 26, an emaciated bay gelding with probable stomach parasites. He watches over No. 17, a skittish 6-month-old filly in the next stall that flinches at an extended hand. Outside, in a pasture, there's No. 3, another skinny horse, with an abscessed tooth, and several other horses that have had so little contact with people that they're virtually wild.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Early in "War Horse," the much-celebrated play now at the Hippodrome, a British farm boy named Albert tries to befriend Joey, a foal that his father bought with money intended for a mortgage payment. The anxious animal keeps his distance, but Albert is determined to breach the divide. After several attempts, the boy holds some feed behind his back, and the wary Joey slowly approaches. The whole scene produces a rare kind of theatrical magic, enough to make you quickly forget that the foal is a puppet operated by three humans, two inside and one out. If that moment, with all its charm and innocence, doesn't get to you, doesn't tug at whatever heartstrings you have, you may be in for a very uncomfortable ride.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
More than 35 horses, cows, bulls and goats rescued in near-starving condition Thursday from a Garrett County farm have been taken to farms in western Howard County. The horses, which were taken to Days End Rescue Farm in Woodbine, are straining the ability of that facility to care for them. Days End took 26 horses, according to Sue Mitchell, development director for the mostly volunteer, 58-acre farm off Frederick Road, and a farm across the street took the cows, bulls and goats temporarily, she said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Four horses, five ponies and three goats suffering from various levels of emaciation were removed from a property in Severn this week, according to the Anne Arundel County Police Department. Animal Control officials have been investigating the property since January, when they received an anonymous complaint about a dead horse on the property, said Robin Small, Animal Control administrator. At that time, one dead horse and two dead baby goats were removed, and three ponies were turned over to a rescue organization, police said.
EXPLORE
March 15, 2013
There appears to be yet another reality check for those who thought that casino gambling would save horse racing in Maryland: twice as many horses were euthanized at Maryland race tracks last year (21) as in the previous year. Apparently track conditions and animal care regimens have not changed;  speculation is that with slot gambling responsible for larger purses, more horses are being raced in less than perfect condition. Casino gambling was supposed to be the panacea for Maryland's woes. Yet we have new and higher taxes, and now the animals are paying, too.  Marjorie Schulenburg Laurel
NEWS
December 1, 2010
I attended the Preakness many times when I was younger, but I won't mourn the death of Maryland horse racing one bit now that I realized how inhumane horse racing is ( "Preakness at risk," Nov. 30). People often accuse Orioles players of steroid use, and sometimes rightfully so, but racetracks are virtual crack houses compared to baseball fields. Horses are given drugs, both legal and illegal, to mask pain and injuries and make them run faster. Many horses are forced to race on hard surfaces and suffer from chronic foot problems as a result.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
A fire badly damaged a recently-renovated building at Sagamore Farm in northern Baltimore County Monday night into Tuesday, the farm's management and Baltimore County fire officials said. The fire, which occurred in the 3500 block of Belmont Avenue in Reisterstown, began around 11:28 p.m. Monday and was under control by 1:18 a.m. Tuesday, Baltimore County fire officials said in a statement. Tom Mullikin, manager of Sagamore Farm - which is owned by Under Armour founder Kevin Plank - said in a statement the fire took place at "our newly constructed employee quarters" and caused "significant" damage.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - As California Chrome began his recovery from a foot injury that might have contributed to his flat performance in the Belmont Stakes, his co-owner, Steve Coburn, stood by harsh comments about owners and trainers who run fresh horses in the third leg of the Triple Crown. An unrepentant Coburn said the Belmont, which pitted numerous fresh horses against a tired California Chrome, was "like me, at 6-foot-2, playing basketball with a kid in a wheelchair. " Coburn had become one of the stars of California Chrome's Triple Crown quest with his bold predictions of victory and his talk of representing the little guy in a sport full of blue bloods.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Edwin "Ted" William Baker, one of Columbia's original planners and a world traveler whose pursuits included rough-terrain horseback riding, died of a cardiac arrest Tuesday. The Baltimore resident was 77. Mr. Baker grew up in California and earned a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley in 1959. His two years in the Navy after graduation fueled a lasting love of visiting new places, said his daughter, Caroline S.A. Baker of Baltimore. "He traveled all over in those two years and wrote postcards from all different hemispheres — from Japan and Sydney, Australia, and off the coast of Africa," she said.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn spent the past five weeks captivating America with his folksy charm and a shoot-from-the-hip style that seemed refreshing until he shot himself in the foot on Saturday. Instead of expressing his great pride in a low-budget horse that captured the imagination of the nation and nearly became the first horse in 36 years to win horse racing's Triple Crown, Coburn blasted the format that forced his horse to face several Kentucky Derby rivals who rested through the Preakness and crowned a new Belmont Stakes champion who had not run since May 10. He called the strategy "a coward's way out" during a nationally televised interview that wasn't folksy or charming.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - There's an old saying in horse racing that all men are equal on the turf and under it. Put another way, this sport confounds sheiks and scions of American dynasties who drop millions of dollars in futile efforts to breed a Kentucky Derby winner. Meanwhile, two neophytes can spend $10,000 to breed a horse for the first time and come within a whisker of the Triple Crown. That's California Chrome's story as he prepares to chase racing's signature achievement in Saturday's Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - For months now, California Chrome has carried the outlandish dreams of his little-guy owners and his unsung trainer every time he's roared around another racetrack. As his victories have mounted, so has his cargo. When he enters the starting gate for Saturday's Belmont Stakes, the dashing chestnut colt will carry the dreams of every thoroughbred racing enthusiast yearning to see the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. It would be great for the sport, they say. And it's hard to argue against the value of a transcendent hero to offset years of drug scandals, declining crowds and fractured governance.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
Dressed in her riding togs, Abby Mahoney-Cloutier, 10, took one brief look around the familiar barn, with the horses peering out of their stalls, and burst into sobs. Overwhelmed by fear, the autistic child flailed at the walls. Joan Marie Twining, Abby's riding instructor for the past year, put her arm around the wiry young girl and spoke in soft, assuring tones. With Abby now subdued, Twining walked her to a tethered horse named Izzy and handed the child a brush. Talking to Izzy in the same gentle tones she had just heard, Abby groomed the horse she considers her own. "I know you are liking that," she whispered in Izzy's ear. Watching from the side, Abby's mother says she has often seen her daughter's mood transformed at Twining's Rose of Sharon Equestrian School from inconsolable to confident.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
When a deadly earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, and Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana seven years ago, humans weren't the only creatures in distress. Countless horses and other animals also needed help, and emergency teams from the Woodbine-based Days End Farm Horse Rescue came to their aid. The 58-acre farm in Woodbine, established in 1989, has carved out an international reputation for its work training first responders, animal control officers,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Metro Meteor, whose abstract paintings rapidly are becoming an art world sensation, might be just a horse. And the 11-year-old bay, like all equines, has a hard time distinguishing reds from greens or browns. Yet Metro's original watercolors have become the runaway favorite at a regional art gallery. He has racked up a combined $130,000 in sales for his paintings and, through a separate licensing agreement, a line of home-decorating products. "Metro is by far our best-selling artist," said Peggy Rock, the director of Gallery 30 in Gettysburg, Pa. There, the horse, who is stabled here in Frederick County, has sold 80 large paintings and 300 miniature works at prices ranging from $80 to $850.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - Billy Gowan has a vision in his mind's eye of how Saturday's Belmont Stakes might unfold. He pictures his horse, Ride On Curlin, pulling alongside Triple Crown aspirant California Chrome with a quarter mile left in the race. "I'd like to be eyeing California Chrome and see who has the best horse," says the folksy Louisiana native. "I'd like to see me and him come down the stretch, because we've made it to all three dances. " Ride On Curlin and General a Rod are the only challengers who've chased California Chrome through each leg of his quest for the first Triple Crown since 1978.
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