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By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 7, 2011
Ever dreamed of owning a Kentucky Derby horse? Plenty of people have, but the buy-in price typically scares them off. Still, if you catch a horse at auction at the right time, and if you have the right eye to identify talent, you can do it without completely emptying your checkbook. Bloodhorse,com, a website that covers the horse racing industry as well as any publication out there, published a list this week showing all the prices the qualifiers for the Kentucky Derby field fetched at auction (at least those that were ever offered for public auction)
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SPORTS
By Nate Rabner, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Marilyn Little grew up with horses. "Horses were my playmates in the afternoon," said the Frederick native. "I was really lucky to have that. … It's served me well. " As a competitor on the international equestrian scene, Little is making the most of her experience. She's compiled a formidable resume: first-place Grand Prix finishes, a European tour as the youngest rider to represent the U.S. Equestrian Team and appearances at competitions around the world. The latest addition is a second-place finish for Little, 32, and RF Demeter, a 12-year-old Oldenburg mare owned by Raylyn Farms and Team Demeter, at The Fork International Horse Trials CIC3*, a three-day event in Norwood, N.C., last weekend.
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NEWS
May 3, 2010
Red roses, mint juleps, celebrities and the wealthy stylishly attired: The Kentucky Derby will once again prove itself the highlight of the horse racing season. But the glamour to be seen Saturday in Louisville masked the more telling "Hollywood" allure that's increasingly making horses and races the most irrelevant feature of tracks. Penn National Gaming announced recently that Charles Town Races and Slots in Charles Town, W.Va., will henceforth be known as the Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races.
EXPLORE
April 8, 2014
Email sports copy to howardcountysports@patuxent.com by 9 a.m. Monday. Horses The Maryland Open Horse Show Series kicks off its inaugural show this weekend, April 13, at Schooley Mill Park in Highland. The first of seven shows offered this year, the Maryland Open Horse Show Series presents a series of schooling events designed to help both horses and riders. Classes will be offered for all levels of riding and ages. Other show dates are May 18, June 21, July 20, Aug 24, Sept.
NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post | May 23, 2010
No. 9 is a tall, rangy horse familiar with people but a good 300 pounds underweight. His ribs protrude beneath his skin. He has no fat on his body and little muscle, and he is in the last stages of starvation. In a stall across from him stands No. 26, an emaciated bay gelding with probable stomach parasites. He watches over No. 17, a skittish 6-month-old filly in the next stall that flinches at an extended hand. Outside, in a pasture, there's No. 3, another skinny horse, with an abscessed tooth, and several other horses that have had so little contact with people that they're virtually wild.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Early in "War Horse," the much-celebrated play now at the Hippodrome, a British farm boy named Albert tries to befriend Joey, a foal that his father bought with money intended for a mortgage payment. The anxious animal keeps his distance, but Albert is determined to breach the divide. After several attempts, the boy holds some feed behind his back, and the wary Joey slowly approaches. The whole scene produces a rare kind of theatrical magic, enough to make you quickly forget that the foal is a puppet operated by three humans, two inside and one out. If that moment, with all its charm and innocence, doesn't get to you, doesn't tug at whatever heartstrings you have, you may be in for a very uncomfortable ride.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
Dressed in her riding togs, Abby Mahoney-Cloutier, 10, took one brief look around the familiar barn, with the horses peering out of their stalls, and burst into sobs. Overwhelmed by fear, the autistic child flailed at the walls. Joan Marie Twining, Abby's riding instructor for the past year, put her arm around the wiry young girl and spoke in soft, assuring tones. With Abby now subdued, Twining walked her to a tethered horse named Izzy and handed the child a brush. Talking to Izzy in the same gentle tones she had just heard, Abby groomed the horse she considers her own. "I know you are liking that," she whispered in Izzy's ear. Watching from the side, Abby's mother says she has often seen her daughter's mood transformed at Twining's Rose of Sharon Equestrian School from inconsolable to confident.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
More than 35 horses, cows, bulls and goats rescued in near-starving condition Thursday from a Garrett County farm have been taken to farms in western Howard County. The horses, which were taken to Days End Rescue Farm in Woodbine, are straining the ability of that facility to care for them. Days End took 26 horses, according to Sue Mitchell, development director for the mostly volunteer, 58-acre farm off Frederick Road, and a farm across the street took the cows, bulls and goats temporarily, she said.
EXPLORE
March 15, 2013
There appears to be yet another reality check for those who thought that casino gambling would save horse racing in Maryland: twice as many horses were euthanized at Maryland race tracks last year (21) as in the previous year. Apparently track conditions and animal care regimens have not changed;  speculation is that with slot gambling responsible for larger purses, more horses are being raced in less than perfect condition. Casino gambling was supposed to be the panacea for Maryland's woes. Yet we have new and higher taxes, and now the animals are paying, too.  Marjorie Schulenburg Laurel
NEWS
December 1, 2010
I attended the Preakness many times when I was younger, but I won't mourn the death of Maryland horse racing one bit now that I realized how inhumane horse racing is ( "Preakness at risk," Nov. 30). People often accuse Orioles players of steroid use, and sometimes rightfully so, but racetracks are virtual crack houses compared to baseball fields. Horses are given drugs, both legal and illegal, to mask pain and injuries and make them run faster. Many horses are forced to race on hard surfaces and suffer from chronic foot problems as a result.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 8, 2014
Until recently, when someone who enjoys horseback riding in the Maryland countryside told me about a legislative effort to repeal the state's ban on Sunday hunting, I had no idea that such a prohibition was still in place. It struck me as archaic. No hunting on Sunday seems like a blue law, after all, and many of the blue laws that prohibited us from doing certain things on the Christian day of rest were repealed decades ago. As a result, Sunday has become one of the busiest days of the week.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | April 6, 2014
Julian Pimentel kept Ben's Cat under a snug hold until a furlong from home, then signaled for him to go and spurted away to win the $75,000 Mister Diz Stakes, the first of three stakes races Saturday at Pimlico Race Course . This was the fifth year in a row that the King Leatherbury homebred has won the Mister Diz. Hall of Famer Kelso won the Jockey Club Gold Cup five straight times (1960-64). Making his season debut, the 8-year old son of Parker's Storm Cat covered the 5-furlong distance over the good turf in 1 minute, 1.75 seconds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
First it was Dark Horse Saloon, then it was The Horse With No Name and now it's closed. The Horse With No Name and its adjacent video-game hangout Baltimore Bar Arcade in Canton are no longer open,  general manager Amber Nolan confirmed this afternoon. The last day of operation was "about two weeks ago," Nolan said. The tandem bars first opened in June 2011 as Irish pub Finnegan's Wake and Dark Horse Saloon. After ownership changes, Finnegan's Wake closed in March 2012. Last year, the former Irish pub filled its space with arcade game consoles and rebranded itself Baltimore Bar Arcade.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | March 14, 2014
Et cetera Horse owner Arnold Heft dies; he pitched in minors, co-owned Bullets Arnold Heft , a longtime horse owner who pitched for the minor league Orioles in 1938, refereed in the NBA from 1945 to 1961 and co-owned the Baltimore Bullets from 1964 to 1968, died in his sleep Wednesday night at Sunrise at Fox Hill Senior Living Facility in Bethesda. He was 94. Heft pitched four minor league seasons, finishing with a 30-25 record, including 22 victories for Owensboro in the D League in 1941.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
Horses don't belong in traffic or anywhere in the city ( "Baltimore Arabbers on edge after rash of run-ins with cars," March 5). It is a horrible life for them. They are scared, nervous, bored all denied all their ordinary social needs. I would have thought we had advanced further than this as a society and had left behind us the forced toil of innocent, speechless sentient creatures in an alien environment. These periodic debates about Arabbers never acknowledge the plainly obvious fact that these horses have terrible lives working in the busy streets with traffic and noise all around them.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
As three Arabbers rode through South Baltimore on their horse-drawn fruit cart, a Chevrolet Impala barreled toward them. The men jumped off just before the car slammed their wagon into a utility pole, spilling watermelons and cantaloupes across the sidewalk. Tony, the tan Palomino that had been pulling the cart, escaped with only minor scratches. He was soon munching grass in a nearby median. The produce vendors consider themselves lucky to have survived, but the incident last year was one of several recent crashes that have put Baltimore's community of Arabbers on edge.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Four horses, five ponies and three goats suffering from various levels of emaciation were removed from a property in Severn this week, according to the Anne Arundel County Police Department. Animal Control officials have been investigating the property since January, when they received an anonymous complaint about a dead horse on the property, said Robin Small, Animal Control administrator. At that time, one dead horse and two dead baby goats were removed, and three ponies were turned over to a rescue organization, police said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 11, 2009
Horses that pulled wagons loaded with strawberries and cantaloupe were put out to pasture Tuesday after city animal control and humane society officials closed the largest stable that had housed the animals. Baltimore City Health Department officials, in conjunction with the Humane Society of the United States, confiscated 19 horses owned by a-rabs, the name given to street vendors who sell produce from red wagons that have long swayed along city alleys and roads to the jingle of silver-toned bridle bells.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Scheduled horse racing at Laurel Park was canceled Saturday for the third day in a row because of inclement weather, Maryland Racing officials said. The $300,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap and $100,000 John Campbell Handicap have been rescheduled for next Saturday, Feb. 22. Live racing is also scheduled to start again Monday at 12:35 p.m. That 10-race card will feature the $250,000 General George Handicap and the $100,000 Maryland Racing Media Stakes. Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course will be open for simulcasting on Saturday, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Early in "War Horse," the much-celebrated play now at the Hippodrome, a British farm boy named Albert tries to befriend Joey, a foal that his father bought with money intended for a mortgage payment. The anxious animal keeps his distance, but Albert is determined to breach the divide. After several attempts, the boy holds some feed behind his back, and the wary Joey slowly approaches. The whole scene produces a rare kind of theatrical magic, enough to make you quickly forget that the foal is a puppet operated by three humans, two inside and one out. If that moment, with all its charm and innocence, doesn't get to you, doesn't tug at whatever heartstrings you have, you may be in for a very uncomfortable ride.
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