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By Rob Kasper | November 15, 2000
THIS THANKSGIVING, I will make horseradish sauce and remember my dad. My dad died two years ago, but I think about him often, especially during the holidays. Festive holiday meals are primarily celebrations for the living, but they also stir up memories of folks who have passed on. My dad, for instance, loved horseradish. Now every time I sniff the pungent root, I think of him. During family meals, he used to open the horseradish jar, inhale, then thrust the aromatic container toward his four sons and urge us to "smell the horseradish."
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2010
Baltimore's manufacturing base has suffered just like everywhere else in the nation — the victim of cheap labor overseas and a changing business climate at home. What is left of manufacturing in the Baltimore metro area — diminished to about 5 percent of the region's work force from roughly one-third in the heyday of the 1950s — is a small cadre of companies that have found a blueprint for success. They are large corporations like Under Armour Inc., the homegrown sports apparel maker, and household names such as Domino Sugars, which still operates a factory on Baltimore's waterfront.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
The pungent smell of horseradish, tinged with vinegar, clings to the walls, the workers and the machinery at Tulkoff Food Products Inc.'s plant in Canton. In a large room, batches of gnarly horseradish roots are carried up a conveyor and washed, and then tumbled into the first of two grinding mills. It's been business as usual this past week at the plant on Conkling Street. But for five days back in February, the company's automated process for crushing and blending the bitter root into a spicy condiment came to a standstill.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2008
Philip Tulkoff spent most of his career in engineering and computers. The food manufacturing business started by his Russian immigrant grandparents nearly 80 years ago had only been his high school summer job. So no one was more surprised than Tulkoff, 47, when he was asked three years ago to take over as chief executive of Baltimore-based Tulkoff Food Products Inc., best known for its horseradish and related products. "It totally came out of the blue," Tulkoff said. "I really had to learn everything."
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | February 20, 2008
Tired of fast-food burgers? Here are homemade burgers with a horseradish kick that will put any Big Mac to shame. I like to top them with sauteed mushrooms and parsley for a great flavor combo and serve them on good bakery pumpernickel bread. You can get these burgers to the table in just 30 minutes - faster than a trip to Mickey D's. Carol Mighton Haddix writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Open-Faced Mushroom Burgers on Pumpernickel Serves 4 -- Total time: 30 minutes 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil 1 container (8 ounces)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2000
If an apple a day keeps the doctor away, will a California roll a day keep the dentist at bay? Probably not. But there is a claim that certain compounds found in wasabi, the piquant green horseradish that accompanies sushi and sashimi, can kill the bacteria that cause tooth decay. The notion of wasabi-as-cavity-fighter was developed by Dr. Hideki Masuda, a research director at Ogawa and Co. of Japan, which makes food flavorings and fragrances, including wasabi flavors, but not wasabi paste.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 14, 2007
Martin J. Tulkoff, chairman of the board of Tulkoff Food Products Inc., whose "Flaming Hot" horseradish has been raising the heat on sandwiches and clearing the sinuses of Baltimoreans for three decades, died of lung cancer Saturday at his Pikesville home. He was 73. Mr. Tulkoff was born in Baltimore to Harry and Lena Tulkoff, Russian immigrants who settled in the city in the early 1920s. He spent his early years above his parents' produce business - the New York Fruit Co. - in a building at 1018 E. Lombard St., in the city's Corned Beef Row neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 10, 1996
FULL OF ANTICIPATION, I dug up the horseradish. I had been accustomed to dealing with ground horseradish in a jar, but now I was going to get the herb in its primal form, horseradish roots.I'm talking grind-your-own horseradish. Common-sense sorts might ask why anyone would want to dig up and grind his own horseradish. This has little do with common sense. This has to do with gardening.Gardening is a leisure-time activity that involves lots of time and not much leisure. In the spring, when enthusiasm and the barometer are surging, you plant every kind of plant you can get your hands on. In the fall, when enthusiasm is dropping faster than your frost-bitten tomatoes, you look over in the corner of the garden at one of the few surviving species, and ask, "Is that a plant or a weed?"
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | December 3, 2003
Buy a ham this holiday season and help the hungry in America. For the 14th year, Hormel is offering its Hams for Hunger program. Consumers who buy qualifying Hormel Foods meat from participating supermarkets help grocers earn certificates for Hormel's Cure 81 hams. The certificates then are donated to hunger charities, most of which are part of America's Second Harvest network of food banks and food rescue programs. Hormel Foods matches the donation of every ham earned and donated. Giant and Super Fresh stores in the Baltimore area are participating in the program, which runs until Dec. 27. For more information, visit www.hormel.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
When Memorial Day arrives in late May, bringing warm temperatures, it marks a change in the way I cook and entertain. We open our sun porch, clean all the dusty furniture and set out potted plants. My husband rolls out the grill from the garage, scrubs its grate and rushes off to the store for a season's supply of charcoal. I start to weed and water my herb garden. At last I can move my cooking to the back yard and plan meals that can be eaten there. Our first official "grill meal" of the season takes place on this holiday weekend, and this year I can't wait to try some new creations along with some old-time favorites.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | February 20, 2008
Tired of fast-food burgers? Here are homemade burgers with a horseradish kick that will put any Big Mac to shame. I like to top them with sauteed mushrooms and parsley for a great flavor combo and serve them on good bakery pumpernickel bread. You can get these burgers to the table in just 30 minutes - faster than a trip to Mickey D's. Carol Mighton Haddix writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Open-Faced Mushroom Burgers on Pumpernickel Serves 4 -- Total time: 30 minutes 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil 1 container (8 ounces)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 14, 2007
Martin J. Tulkoff, chairman of the board of Tulkoff Food Products Inc., whose "Flaming Hot" horseradish has been raising the heat on sandwiches and clearing the sinuses of Baltimoreans for three decades, died of lung cancer Saturday at his Pikesville home. He was 73. Mr. Tulkoff was born in Baltimore to Harry and Lena Tulkoff, Russian immigrants who settled in the city in the early 1920s. He spent his early years above his parents' produce business - the New York Fruit Co. - in a building at 1018 E. Lombard St., in the city's Corned Beef Row neighborhood.
NEWS
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2005
Before the iPod, before color TV, even before cars were common, a log hunting lodge stood where U.S. 40 traffic now rushes past in Ellicott City. It was the early 1900s, and the lodge no doubt looked right for its times. A century later, the building is the Blue Pointe Grille and seems a little out of place between a fast-food joint and a hot-tub store - out of place, but interesting amid all the bland-box retail. And the building is interesting. Though it started as a hunting lodge, it has also been a Chinese restaurant and a place called Pirate's Cove.
NEWS
December 13, 2004
Edgar Allan Toppin, 76, a nationally known expert on black history who was key in establishing Black History Month, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure in Richmond, Va. Dr. Toppin, a professor emeritus at Virginia State University, wrote 10 books during his nearly 50-year career. As president of the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History, he was instrumental in turning Black History Week into Black History Month in 1976, said Lauranett Lee, curator of African-American history at the Virginia Historical Society.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 31, 2004
Matthew's 1600, the new restaurant in Catons-ville, does so many things right you have to wonder why it doesn't go one step further and do everything right. The new owners have spent a lot of money turning the old Wharfside, which had been closed about a year, into a comfortable new dining room and a cheerful bar with booths and lots of blond wood. The staff couldn't be nicer. The menu is user-friendly, with plenty of entrees under $15 as well as dinner salads and sandwiches. Perfect for a bite after work.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2004
Food manufacturers just love wasabi, using this Japanese rhizome (or cheaper American horseradish) to jazz up oils, mayonnaise, dressings, crackers, nuts and even jams. Those looking to experience the trend can find wasabi products in a variety of locations, from neighborhood supermarkets to fancy food stores and Asian markets. Here are some of the wasabi products to look for: Hime Japanese horseradish powder, $2.80 to $4 an ounce. This powder makes a green paste with a flavor as bold as its bright green color.
FEATURES
By Cathy Barber and Cathy Barber,Universal Press Syndicate | June 3, 1998
Here's a way to get some extra mileage from your next smoking session.While the smoker is fired up, smoke some trout, then use the fish to make an intense spread.Cookbook authors Bill and Cheryl Alters Jamison include the recipe in their book "Sublime Smoke" (Harvard Common Press, $16.95).A whole trout smokes in about 30 minutes. You can put the fish on when you finish smoking the main course. Make the spread and refrigerate it to serve the next day.Because fish tends to dry out in a smoker, the Jamisons recommend covering the fish with a paste, in this case, lemon juice and horseradish.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 16, 1999
When a good friend called to say she would be in town to visit her son, who attends college nearby, I invited her to stay with us. I planned meals for the entire weekend, but as it turned out, her offspring, unenthusiastic about his dorm food, had his heart set on dining out in several area restaurants. His mother willingly complied, but it meant that my husband and I were able to share only one meal -- Sunday lunch -- with her.Our friend indulged in all manner of ethnic foods, including Italian, Mexican and French, during her brief visit with her son, but mentioned that what she longed for most was meat and potatoes.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | December 3, 2003
Buy a ham this holiday season and help the hungry in America. For the 14th year, Hormel is offering its Hams for Hunger program. Consumers who buy qualifying Hormel Foods meat from participating supermarkets help grocers earn certificates for Hormel's Cure 81 hams. The certificates then are donated to hunger charities, most of which are part of America's Second Harvest network of food banks and food rescue programs. Hormel Foods matches the donation of every ham earned and donated. Giant and Super Fresh stores in the Baltimore area are participating in the program, which runs until Dec. 27. For more information, visit www.hormel.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
At the turn of the Jewish New Year, who can resist signs of renewal, or even miracles? With the New Year beginning Friday night, imagine the sense of wonder in turning to page 26 of a new cookbook, Kosher by Design, to find a vision in green, orange and white, a triple-layer wedge of delight and delicacy that could proudly be served by the finest cake baker. But wait a minute, it's not a slice of cake. It's ... Gefilte fish? The page heading, Tricolor Gefilte Fish, appears above this picture of loveliness, a disconnect of word and image that perhaps demands translation here.
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