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May 3, 1992
When the late Eugene V. Klein, owner of the San Diego Chargers football team, named a bay colt Tank's Prospect, it was a tribute to Paul "Tank" Younger, one of the ablest fullbacks in the history of the Los Angeles Rams. At the time, Younger was working for the Chargers, in charge of making personnel decisions."You hear the reason more colts and fillies aren't named for people is some kind of jinx is thought to be involved," he said. "They don't fare too well. But this one was exceptional."
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By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
As Kentucky Derby winner I'll Have Another vanned out of Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport with a police escort Monday afternoon, he was greeted by local horse fans trying to make him feel instantly at home. "People were lined up and chanting, 'I'd love another,'" said assistant trainer Jack Sisterson, who accompanied the horse on a flight from Louisville, Ky. "His ears are pricked and he's bobbing his head, 'Yeah, that's me!'" At Pimlico Race Course , cameras from local television stations were lined up along print media to record the arrival of the gorgeous, Doug O'Neill-trained chestnut as he came off the trailer and pranced to his stall.
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By JOHN EISENBERG | May 5, 1991
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Let's start with one basic fact. The best horse won the Kentucky Derby yesterday. That isn't as obvious as it sounds. A sprawling field, a jockey's ride, lousy weather, an unlucky post position -- many are the things that can turn a race in strange directions. Not so this time.Strike the Gold circled the pack as he rallied from 12th in the 16-horse field, outrunning the other contenders from the outside. In other words, he won taking the long route. He didn't need the rail.
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By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,NEWSDAY | March 22, 2004
Trainer Nick Zito's expression of disbelief as he faced television cameras moments after having watched Birdstone founder in the mud at Turfway Park as the odds-on favorite in Saturday's Lane's End captured the chaos into which the chase toward Churchill Downs has lapsed. Zito's incredulity is widely shared. The pile of dented armor grows and the emerging possibilities previously unforeseen multiply with each weekend. Thirty different horses have won 38 stakes races for 3-year-olds run since Jan. 1. In fact, the horses that did well in this week's edition of the Triple Crown Ratings were those that didn't run. Only two horses received top 10 votes from all five panelists - Eurosilver, rated first, and Florida Derby winner Friends Lake, who is third.
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
ELMONT, N.Y. - Pat Day and Wally Dollase, jockey and trainer of Ten Most Wanted, expected to win the Kentucky Derby. Their hopes vanished quickly when the horse stumbled out of the gate, got bumped twice and finished ninth. The colt hurt his back, and it took a chiropractor to repair the damage. Yesterday, in the Belmont, Day and Dollase hoped to get their reward - and they nearly succeeded. Ten Most Wanted challenged Empire Maker down the stretch but fell three quarters of a length short, finishing second.
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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1994
It was a dispirited, mud-splattered Mike Smith who stepped off Holy Bull after the Kentucky Derby favorite finished 18 1/4 lengths behind the winner Saturday.But the jockey will a chance to redeem himself on another gray horse in Saturday's $600,000 Pimlico Special.His mount, Pistols and Roses, took a spin around the Pimlico Race Course oval yesterday morning, and it was a quick one.The 5-year-old horse, with exercise rider Arthur Mayorga aboard, stepped five furlongs in 58 seconds, one of the quicker morning moves track watchers have seen at Pimlico this spring.
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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
Jockeys are notoriously bad handicappers, but Edgar Prado chose the right horse yesterday to ride in Laurel Park's $100,000 Northern Dancer Stakes.The track's leading jockey was offered the mount on Maryland Million winner and 3-2 favorite Short Stay, but he chose to ride the 6-1 third choice, Algar.Algar circled the eight-horse field after lagging behind early and won by 3 1/2 lengths. Short Stay faded after prompting the pace and finished seventh, nearly 17 lengths behind the winner."If you're going to be right, it's good to do it in a $100,000 race," said Prado's agent, Steve Rushing, who added "we've also been wrong plenty of times."
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | July 31, 1994
Brass Scale, a 3-year-old competing against older horses, made his stakes debut an impressive one yesterday at Pimlico.The gelding challenged the track record for 1 1/8 miles while coming from just off the pace under Edgar Prado for a 2 1/4 -length victory over Jest Punching in the $53,400 Broad Brush Stakes.In the process, Brass Scale defeated the defending champion of the stakes, Frottage, who passed the tiring pacesetter, Ameri Valay, for third in a five-horse field.Brass Scale stalked the leaders until reaching the top of the lane, then roared past them to finish in 1:47 3/5, only two-fifths of a second off Private Terms' track record.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 17, 1991
You are Nick Zito and you still have the same silver-gray hair and five-boroughs scratch in your voice, but people expect you to be different now. They look at you with wise, little smiles and expect you to wink and admit you always knew you had a rare touch with a horse. But you just can't do it."You won the Kentucky Derby," they tell you."No," you say, "my horse won the Kentucky Derby."You know people don't believe this humility. You know the customary American response is to grab your 15 minutes and shout your name out loud.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
Rosalind Cole, breeder and part owner of Preakness long shot Kandaly, arrived in Baltimore yesterday brandishing a broken wrist and some words of warning."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2003
Aloma's Ruler, who held the mantle of oldest living Preakness winner for 12 days, died June 21 at a farm in Illinois. He was 24. When Spectacular Bid, winner of the 1979 Preakness, died June 9 in New York, Aloma's Ruler became the oldest living winner of the second jewel of racing's Triple Crown. Aloma's Ruler captured the Preakness in 1982, defeating the heavy favorite, Linkage, by a half length. Aloma's Ruler and Linkage were stabled in Maryland. John J. "Butch" Lenzini Jr. trained Aloma's Ruler, and Maryland builder Nathan "Red" Scherr owned him. A 16-year-old jockey, "Cowboy Jack" Kaenel, rode the colt to victory in the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Spectacular Bid, whom his Maryland trainer Grover G. "Bud" Delp called "the greatest horse ever to look through a bridle," died Monday of an apparent heart attack at Milfer Farm in Unadilla, N.Y. Bid, as he was called, was 27. His passing marks the end of an era. Spectacular Bid, who was probably the greatest living racehorse, was the last of the great horses of the 1970s, the golden decade of racing in America. "The American superstars from that era are gone," said Tim Capps, referring to the likes of Secretariat, Affirmed, Seattle Slew and now Spectacular Bid. "The titans are gone."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
ELMONT, N.Y. - Pat Day and Wally Dollase, jockey and trainer of Ten Most Wanted, expected to win the Kentucky Derby. Their hopes vanished quickly when the horse stumbled out of the gate, got bumped twice and finished ninth. The colt hurt his back, and it took a chiropractor to repair the damage. Yesterday, in the Belmont, Day and Dollase hoped to get their reward - and they nearly succeeded. Ten Most Wanted challenged Empire Maker down the stretch but fell three quarters of a length short, finishing second.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
Jockeys are notoriously bad handicappers, but Edgar Prado chose the right horse yesterday to ride in Laurel Park's $100,000 Northern Dancer Stakes.The track's leading jockey was offered the mount on Maryland Million winner and 3-2 favorite Short Stay, but he chose to ride the 6-1 third choice, Algar.Algar circled the eight-horse field after lagging behind early and won by 3 1/2 lengths. Short Stay faded after prompting the pace and finished seventh, nearly 17 lengths behind the winner."If you're going to be right, it's good to do it in a $100,000 race," said Prado's agent, Steve Rushing, who added "we've also been wrong plenty of times."
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 14, 1995
Putting the name Stallions on Baltimore's team in the Canadian Football League wasn't all that bad an idea. Except Jim Speros should have thought of it earlier rather than later.Speros has been all over the lot in pursuit of a name. First he tried Colts, only to be denied by the courts. Next, after protracted consideration, he decided to go without a name -- which was distinctive and also refreshing.There's no rule in any book that specifies teams must play with nicknames. The franchise, Speros promised, would then and thereafter be known as the Baltimore Football Club.
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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
David Smaga will be trying to upset North America's best grass horse, Paradise Creek, tomorrow with an ex-French steeplechaser in the Washington D.C. International.Paradise Creek is such a prohibitive favorite that when the nine-horse field was drawn yesterday at Laurel Race Course, track oddsmaker Clem Florio made him the 2-5 favorite, the kind of price reserved for a champion.Even Smaga is realistic about the International's probable outcome."Second chance," is how he summed up the shot of his 7-year-old horse, Marildo.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | May 19, 1991
This is the saga of Canonero II, the Caracas Cannonball that came out of Venezuela 20 years ago and made a gallant run at winning horse racing's Triple Crown.A $1,200 yearling with a crooked right foreleg was transformed into a legend. He won the Kentucky Derby. He won the Preakness. He finished fourth in the Belmont. He infuriated the racing establishment, yet endeared himself to millions who were swept up by a tale of long shots and unlikely heroes."It was like Disneyland to be around Canonero II," former Pimlico general manager Chick Lang said.
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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | February 22, 1992
LAUREL -- There is life after Best Pal.That's how Ian Jory sums up his experience after being the protagonist in horse racing's most controversial firing of 1991.Although Jory had earned $1 million with the gelding, the 34-year-old Englishman was sacked by the horse's owners as trainer not long after Best Pal finished fifth in last year's Preakness.Now Jory has resurfaced with another 3-year-old contender, a horse named Vying Victor, that is expected to be the pace-setter today in the Fountain of Youth Stakes at Gulfstream Park.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | July 31, 1994
Brass Scale, a 3-year-old competing against older horses, made his stakes debut an impressive one yesterday at Pimlico.The gelding challenged the track record for 1 1/8 miles while coming from just off the pace under Edgar Prado for a 2 1/4 -length victory over Jest Punching in the $53,400 Broad Brush Stakes.In the process, Brass Scale defeated the defending champion of the stakes, Frottage, who passed the tiring pacesetter, Ameri Valay, for third in a five-horse field.Brass Scale stalked the leaders until reaching the top of the lane, then roared past them to finish in 1:47 3/5, only two-fifths of a second off Private Terms' track record.
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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
Rosalind Cole, breeder and part owner of Preakness long shot Kandaly, arrived in Baltimore yesterday brandishing a broken wrist and some words of warning."
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