Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHorse Track
IN THE NEWS

Horse Track

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | August 9, 1998
EVERY time our governor goes near a horse track, he seems to step in it. He's done so again.By blurting out sweet thoughts he believed would win him bonus points with Sun editorial writers, Gov. Parris N. Glendening kicked off a storm of controversy that his foes eagerly embraced.In the process, though, Mr. Glendening seems to have laid the groundwork for addressing Maryland's horse-racing quandary after the November election -- regardless of who wins.All three of the major candidates -- Mr. Glendening, his Democratic opponent Eileen M. Rehrmann and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey -- have now gone on record acknowledging the need to come up with ways to bolster horse racing in this state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
Sports Digest | January 1, 2014
Et cetera McCarthy, McMahon best of 2013 at Md. tracks Trevor McCarthy and Hugh McMahon wrapped up titles for the calendar year in the jockey and trainer divisions, respectively, at the major Maryland tracks with Tuesday's final card of the season at Laurel Park. McCarthy finished the year with 107 victories at Laurel and Pimlico Race Course , eight more than Sheldon Russell . The promising 19-year-old apprentice rider won four races at Laurel on Jan. 1 and ranked 12th in the nation with 69 wins in early April when he broke his left tibia during training at Laurel and missed five months, ruining his chance at the Eclipse Award for top apprentice jockey.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening came under heavy criticism from both political flanks yesterday, a day after he floated the notion that the state consider using tax dollars to help build a new horse track in Maryland.Two of his opponents for re-election, Democrat Eileen M. Rehrmann and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey, accusedGlendening of misplaced priorities, saying state funds should be used to improve education, not construct racetracks."We could use that money to build schools," Rehrmann said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Haller and Chris Kinling | February 20, 2012
“This Is Why I Don't Love” The final four take a break from exotic vacations this week and bring Ben home to visit their families. Ocala, Fla., with Horse Girl Sarah: Lindzi's estate/plantation includes a horse track (with horses) and two cute little dogs. She's an only child, and her parents are dull, which I suppose is preferable to crazy. She spent most of the time talking about an old boyfriend who broke her heart, but Ben said he had the best time ever.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
There is horsepower, and then there is horsepower. And Charles Bidwell III is feeling the heartbeat of both.Bidwell is a man who wears many hats. He's a businessman, involved in telecommunications, and president of the National Jockey Club.And this weekend, he has put on another one as he and partner Chip Ganassi open the new Chicago Motor Speedway. The one-mile oval racetrack has been built within Sportsman's Park horse track in the Chicago suburb of Cicero, Ill.The design is only the second of its kind in the country.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2003
When the Washington Redskins tried to build a football stadium in Laurel in the early 1990s, nearby residents pummeled them worse than the Raiders did in Super Bowl XVIII. When NASCAR wanted to build a race facility in 1998, residents ran the plan off the track. But as Maryland lawmakers debate a divisive proposal that would allow 3,500 slot machines each at three horse tracks, including Laurel Park, many residents of this community southwest of Baltimore seem to be shrugging their shoulders.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Baltimore lawyer and Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos faces potential competition from other bidders interested in buying bankrupt Rosecroft Raceway as well as opposition from state officials to legalizing slot machines at the Prince George's County horse track. Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that he is focused on getting slots casinos at the five locations approved by voters in 2008 up and running "before we talk about expanding" gambling at other places. And despite Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's support for slots at the Rosecroft harness racetrack, other state lawmakers might not be ready to reopen the debate.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
Two titans of the region's horse-racing industry, William Rickman Jr. and Joseph A. De Francis, will clash over the license to build a horse track in Western Maryland. Rickman, a Montgomery County developer and owner of the Delaware Park horse track and slots emporium near Wilmington, Del., has said for months he wants to build a track in Allegany County. He said he will complete a deal tomorrow to buy 112 acres midway between Hagerstown and Cumberland -- without an option in case his bid for the license fails.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Jay Apperson and Tom Keyser and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
An alliance led by the Maryland Jockey Club has dropped plans to build a horse track in Western Maryland and will instead propose to construct off-track-betting parlors in or near Cumberland and Hagerstown. This shift in strategy would leave William Rickman Jr. as the lone applicant to build a track in Allegany County. But it would not end the battle for control of horse racing in Western Maryland. The two sides would merely fight with different weapons: Rickman with a racetrack, the jockey club-led alliance with two OTBs.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
The competition between two prominent racetrack owners to build a horse track in Western Maryland begins today as each is expected to submit plans to the Maryland Racing Commission. Joe De Francis, head of the company that operates Pimlico and Laurel Park, and Bill Rickman Jr., president and CEO of Delaware Park, said yesterday that they will meet today's deadline to apply for the license to operate a track in Allegany County. Commission officials were expecting no other applications.
EXPLORE
January 19, 2012
Football will be the talk of the town this weekend when it comes to sports, but horse racing might make for an interesting sidebar during the halftime break of the Ravens game. Earlier this week, at a dinner in Beverly Hills, Calif., a horse named Havre de Grace, after the bayfront community in eastern Harford County, was honored as the Horse of the Year. The unfortunate thing about horse racing, at least as far as securing a large modern fan base is concerned, is that it has never managed to secure a TV audience.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 20, 2011
The Maryland Jockey Club wants state slots revenue to help pay its operating costs. You can understand why. The Jockey Club's operating costs have soared because of its extraordinary efforts to undermine and delay state slots revenue. If this makes sense to you, legislators, go ahead and give the owner of Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park what it wants. If it doesn't, don't worry. Nothing else in Maryland's slots policy makes sense either. Having blown its best opportunity for a slots license, the Jockey Club scrambled and whined for a second chance, spending huge amounts to try to get voters to reject a rival slots casino at Arundel Mills mall.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
With casinos in Cecil County and on the Eastern Shore up and running, investors are lining up for a chance at potentially lucrative slots licenses in Baltimore and beyond. At least two groups, one from Canada and another headed by a local attorney, have hired Annapolis lobbyists in preparation for the state's reissuing bids for the parlor planned near Baltimore's sports stadiums, a review of state records shows. With an authorized 4,750 slots terminals, the casino would be one of the state's two largest.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Baltimore lawyer and Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos faces potential competition from other bidders interested in buying bankrupt Rosecroft Raceway as well as opposition from state officials to legalizing slot machines at the Prince George's County horse track. Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that he is focused on getting slots casinos at the five locations approved by voters in 2008 up and running "before we talk about expanding" gambling at other places. And despite Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's support for slots at the Rosecroft harness racetrack, other state lawmakers might not be ready to reopen the debate.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | December 13, 2010
Eminent domain, which gives government authority to forcibly purchase private property, is a last resort in countries that aren't run by juntas or Politburos. It's potent and potentially abusive. It should be exercised only in matters of public interest and when private parties repeatedly fail tests of competence, reasonableness and good faith. Only an extraordinarily feckless company can make a good case for its assets to be seized by the state. The owners of Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park are working hard at making that case.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
Maryland's horse industry had reason to worry when the sale of the Maryland Jockey Club — and with it the Laurel Park and Pimlico race tracks — was short-circuited so that MID, a new arm of Frank Stronach's Magna empire, could buy the properties from the bankrupt Magna Entertainment Corp. The pledges of a new vision for making horse racing viable rang hollow after the first incarnation of Magna failed to make good on the same promises. The announcement today that Penn National Gaming is entering a joint venture with MID to run the jockey club shouldn't come as much comfort; although Penn National started nearly 40 years ago as a thoroughbred track outside of Harrisburg, Pa., the company is now all about slots and table games, with horse racing a distinct afterthought.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
A top representative of the Maryland Jockey Club yesterday threatened to wage an aggressive fight against any new horse track or track operators that would compete with Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park.During a hearing of the House Ways and Means Committee on racing issues, members inquired about the need for a new horse track in Maryland. Alan M. Rifkin, the main lobbyist for the Maryland Jockey Club, paused, lowered his voice and spoke with firm, measured words."We have heard the discussions, cloaked to some degree, about whether the state needs a new racetrack, and whether or not the licensee, my client, ought to be penalized ," said Rifkin, whose client is Joe De Francis, president and CEO of the Maryland Jockey Club and majority owner of Pimlico and Laurel Park.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER and TOM KEYSER,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- In his 34 years at Charles Town Races, the horse track 10 minutes from Maryland, Dickie Moore has seen nothing like it.People around the racetrack are smiling. They're looking forward to the future. Why? Video-lottery terminals, a.k.a. slot machines.Since September last year, when Charles Town opened its glitzy casino, the machines have sucked up money like a vacuum cleaner. Into the track's 798 machines, patrons have wagered $437 million.Proceeds have elevated racing purses to record levels, financed $50 million in renovations and rejuvenated a failing, 65-year-old track.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 23, 2010
The bankrupt owner of Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course has called off an auction of the horse tracks because it has come to an agreement with creditors where its parent company would become the owner, according to parties involved with the deal. Magna Entertainment Corp., which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last March, had been scheduled to auction off the tracks Thursday, but now ownership would go to MI Developments, which owns Magna. The deal would be a part of Magna's reorganization plan, which must be approved by a bankruptcy judge.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | May 16, 2009
Imagine if they tore down the venerable Pimlico Race Course, home of the Preakness Stakes and 139 years of horse racing tradition in Northwest Baltimore. Park Heights shopkeeper Marcus Melvin has pondered the possibility. He'd support a shopping complex as a way to bring needed jobs to the "devastated" neighborhood near the track. No thanks, say Larry and Vicki Kloze, who live a block north of Pimlico. A shopping mall would probably fail, they argue. Far better would be a sedate office park with lots of green space.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.