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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1997
Despite declaring slot machines off the table, the state commission to aid the horse-racing industry spent much of yesterday dealing with slots as the dinner guest who wouldn't leave."
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Sports Digest | September 27, 2014
Et cetera Ben's Cat seeks third Laurel Dash victory Ben's Cat will run today in the $100,000 Laurel Dash with a chance to move ahead of Hall of Famer Safely Kept in earnings among Maryland-breds. The Dash is one of six stakes races on the 12-race card. The card will feature five open stakes races on the turf and the Jameela Stakes for Maryland-bred and/or sired runners. All the races drew double-digit fields. The Laurel Dash drew 11 entries, including one on the also-eligible list.
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NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2005
Life couldn't get much better for Margaret Runk right now, here at the Pimlico Race Course on an unseasonably warm opening day. It's only 2:30 p.m. and already she's won $290 from a lottery ticket and a few hundred more betting on the horses whizzing around the track. Luck is on her side today. If only ... "Slots," the 62-year-old Fells Point resident says dreamily. "You'd have a lot of retired people like us coming here more. Everyone we know goes to Atlantic City [N.J.] and Charles Town [W.Va.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 21, 2014
Horse racing State Fair meet runs Friday to Labor Day The second season of horse racing in Maryland begins Friday with nine races at the Maryland State Fair, the only fair east of the Mississippi that still conducts a sanctioned thoroughbred meeting. The meet covers seven days and will be contested over successive weekends, ending Labor Day. Laurel Park's fall meeting starts Sept. 5. Last year J.D. Acosta accepted 60 mounts at the fair and led riders with 16 wins. He has six mounts Friday.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
When I was chairman of the Maryland Racing Commission, I predicted that all sorts of interests would in the future try and nibble away at any monies directed to try and equalize the position of Maryland's horse racing and breeding industries vis-à-vis surrounding states. So Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's pandering to more insistent political forces by suggesting that the state divert some of the money to pre-K hardly comes as a shock ("Gansler expands pre-K idea," Oct. 11). What fascinates me is that House Speaker Michael E. Busch, who during the administration of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. did everything in his power to prevent the implementation of slots legislation and contemptuously dismissed those who raised concerns about the decline of those once great industries ("the average age of the typical horseplayer is dead")
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | April 4, 2013
That the Orioles could be turned around and have a winning season in 2012 and then open the 2013 season with a victory possibly is reason to hope that other Maryland sporting traditions can be revived. Three cross country horse races that constitute what is informally known as Maryland's Triple Crown of steeplechase racing get their start this weekend and next in Harford County with the decades old traditions surrounding the Elkridge-Harford Point to Point and the My Lady's Manor races, to be followed by the Hunt Cup a few miles to the west in Baltimore County.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
Kudos to The Sun's sports staff and their recent coverage of the grand old Maryland tradition of horse racing ("Digest: Maryland horse wagering rose 7.5 percent in 2012," Jan. 6). Several important stakes races attracting national and international racing stars are being run at Laurel, and it is great that they are getting some coverage. The 15,000 Maryland race track employees, hay growers, vets, farriers and countless fans thank you for this much-needed support. April I. Smith
NEWS
February 27, 2013
Maryland, and specifically the Baltimore region, has a long and storied history as a major player in horse racing. Thoroughbred owners, trainers and the horses live and work in our valleys, and every year the Preakness Stakes brings tens of thousands of people to Charm City. As told in the Jan. 27 article "Next steps for MD. racing," the profitability of the sport has been in major decline over the last several decades. If the horse-racing industry is to be saved, it must learn from other sports and venues in order to reinvent itself as a 21st century form of entertainment.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley is developing a plan to share millions of dollars in slot machine revenue every year if Maryland's private horse racing tracks can convince state officials that they need the money to stay profitable. In legislative briefings this week, O'Malley's aides said the proposal would essentially standardize the emergency deal the governor struck at the end of the year, when the Maryland Jockey Club, which owns Laurel Park in Anne Arundel County and Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, said it did not have enough money to stage a full, 146-day racing calendar this year.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
To Michael Matz, Barbaro's legacy includes a recurring image. It is of the horse with all four feet off the ground. It is as if Barbaro is flying. It has been five years since Barbaro shattered a hind leg at the Preakness, beginning a poignant struggle to save the life of the runaway 2006 Kentucky Derby winner. He eventually suffered from laminitis and was euthanized the following January. At Churchill Downs, where the horse's ashes are buried, there is a bronze statue of Barbaro suspended by a rail so the horse is off the ground — just the way Matz sees him in full sprint in his mind's eye. But the trainer and others believe Barbaro's legacy is more extensive — and more complicated — than the 1,500-pound statue celebrating his breathtaking speed.
SPORTS
Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
On Monday, the Maryland Jockey Club unveiled the logo for next year's Preakness, the 140th running of the middle jewel of horse racing's Triple Crown. For the 16th straight year, the Leffler Agency designed the logo, according to a news release. "Creating the 140th Preakness logo was its usual challenge in terms of building flexibility for everything from embroidered merchandise and painting on grass to use on HD television," Leffler Agency chief executive officer Heather Connellee said in the release.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
I do not follow horse racing all year but found myself intrigued by the Preakness and followed it to see if the Kentucky Derby winner prevailed. Once that happened, there was an excitement about the Belmont Stakes and a possible Triple Crown winner! It felt like having a Triple Crown winner would be a small, positive thing for the United States to be momentarily excited about. So when I saw California Chrome lose to "fresh" horses that did not run the previous two races, I had to agree with owner Steve Coburn that this was very unfair and that the owners were "cheaters" ( "California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn apologizes for critical comments," June 9)
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn spent the past five weeks captivating America with his folksy charm and a shoot-from-the-hip style that seemed refreshing until he shot himself in the foot on Saturday. Instead of expressing his great pride in a low-budget horse that captured the imagination of the nation and nearly became the first horse in 36 years to win horse racing's Triple Crown, Coburn blasted the format that forced his horse to face several Kentucky Derby rivals who rested through the Preakness and crowned a new Belmont Stakes champion who had not run since May 10. He called the strategy "a coward's way out" during a nationally televised interview that wasn't folksy or charming.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - There's an old saying in horse racing that all men are equal on the turf and under it. Put another way, this sport confounds sheiks and scions of American dynasties who drop millions of dollars in futile efforts to breed a Kentucky Derby winner. Meanwhile, two neophytes can spend $10,000 to breed a horse for the first time and come within a whisker of the Triple Crown. That's California Chrome's story as he prepares to chase racing's signature achievement in Saturday's Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - Let the debate go on. California Chrome just didn't have enough left on a beautiful Saturday afternoon here on Long Island, finishing in a dead heat for fourth place in the Belmont Stakes and disappointing a nation full of horse racing enthusiasts and casual sports fans who have waited nearly four decades for a horse to win the Triple Crown. The skeptics were right. The race was won by Tonalist, a horse who didn't run in either the Kentucky Derby or the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - For months now, California Chrome has carried the outlandish dreams of his little-guy owners and his unsung trainer every time he's roared around another racetrack. As his victories have mounted, so has his cargo. When he enters the starting gate for Saturday's Belmont Stakes, the dashing chestnut colt will carry the dreams of every thoroughbred racing enthusiast yearning to see the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. It would be great for the sport, they say. And it's hard to argue against the value of a transcendent hero to offset years of drug scandals, declining crowds and fractured governance.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 21, 2014
Horse racing State Fair meet runs Friday to Labor Day The second season of horse racing in Maryland begins Friday with nine races at the Maryland State Fair, the only fair east of the Mississippi that still conducts a sanctioned thoroughbred meeting. The meet covers seven days and will be contested over successive weekends, ending Labor Day. Laurel Park's fall meeting starts Sept. 5. Last year J.D. Acosta accepted 60 mounts at the fair and led riders with 16 wins. He has six mounts Friday.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | May 20, 2011
At the races, there are two categories of bets -- straight bets that involve only one horse, and exotic bets that involve two or more horses. The standard bet for all wagers is $2. You can bet any amount, starting with $1, but the payoff prices shown on the infield tote board and TVs around the track are always based on a $2 wager. That means if you bet $1, you will get half the amount shown on the tote board. If you bet $4, you get twice the amount shown. STRAIGHT BETS Win: You win if the horse you bet finishes first.
SPORTS
By Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Stewart Elliott chuckled when he was asked the question. Why is winning the Triple Crown so difficult? Elliott, Smarty Jones' jockey in 2004, rattled off a laundry list of reasons why no horse has captured the sport's most prestigious honor since 1978. You need an adaptable horse - one who can adjust to the longer distance at the Belmont Stakes. A horse that can handle running three races in five weeks. One that can handle the hubbub and not get flustered. And a little bit of luck.
SPORTS
By Cody Goodwin and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Patrice Wolfson is talking about a poster. It's a pretty special poster because it shows her favorite horse racing memory. The poster displays a picture from the finish line of the 1978 Belmont Stakes, Affirmed edging out Alydar for the third time in 35 days. On it are the words, "The Last Triple Crown Winner. " "Sometimes I think that's my name, Mrs. Last Triple Crown Winner," said Wolfson, who co-owned Affirmed with her late husband, Louis. That could change this weekend.
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