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By Katie V. Jones | December 30, 2011
The Maryland Hay Bank, an operation of the Mount Airy-based Gentle Giants Draft Horse Rescue, was among 15 organizations awarded a piece of $21,000 in grants this week from the Maryland Horse Industry Board. The Maryland Hay Bank assists private horse owners who are experiencing a financial hardship or a personal crisis with free hay for their horses for 30 days, up to a maximum of 100 total bales. The Maryland Hay Bank is donation driven, and hay is provided at no cost to recipients.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | March 14, 2014
Et cetera Horse owner Arnold Heft dies; he pitched in minors, co-owned Bullets Arnold Heft , a longtime horse owner who pitched for the minor league Orioles in 1938, refereed in the NBA from 1945 to 1961 and co-owned the Baltimore Bullets from 1964 to 1968, died in his sleep Wednesday night at Sunrise at Fox Hill Senior Living Facility in Bethesda. He was 94. Heft pitched four minor league seasons, finishing with a 30-25 record, including 22 victories for Owensboro in the D League in 1941.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 3, 1996
State agriculture officials are urging Maryland horse owners to have their animals vaccinated against Eastern Equine Encephalitis after the death of an unvaccinated horse on Virginia's Eastern Shore.Although primarily a disease of horses and birds, the mosquito-borne illness can be transmitted to humans.The EEE virus was detected recently in mosquitoes trapped in Worcester County and earlier this summer in chickens set out as detectors in southern Delaware."Because of the wet summer, mosquitoes have been particularly prevalent this season on the entire Eastern Shore," said Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
The 94-year-old owner shook hands from his wheelchair in the winner's circle at Laurel Park, pleased with his horse's performance. Arnold "Arnie" Heft had just watched Eighttofasttocatch win the $150,000 Maryland Million Classic. "Racing has been great for me. It's keeping me going right now," said Heft, who owns Eighttofasttocatch with his wife, Sylvia, and is a former co-owner of the Washington Bullets and Capitals, a longtime NBA referee and a former Orioles minor league player.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | January 29, 1992
Veterinarian Lee Miller says he's worried the horse community doesn't know enough about the moldy corn threat this year.Miller, a vetin Woodsboro, Frederick County, who practices in Carroll, says Maryland horse owners didn't know about moldy corn poisoning during the last outbreak until a dozen horses had died.Moldy corn poisoning is frustrating for several reasons: It is almost impossible to detect; there are no known preventive measures other than not feeding corn; the disease has been considered incurable; and the animal must be dead to confirm the diagnosis.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2004
On a recent, rainy evening, a honey-colored horse named Gandolf stood in his outdoor stall - a wooden ring at the Fort Meade Equestrian Center near Odenton - contentedly gnawing on a large bale of hay. "He's one of those horses that is not bothered by anything," said his owner, veteran Matt McKnight. "When I'm here with him, I just zen." McKnight, 26, spends every afternoon at the equestrian center, a place he and many other horse owners - all of them military or Department of the Interior personnel or retirees - call a second home.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | August 6, 2006
Horse owners, who have not had much to cheer about lately with the struggles of Maryland's racing industry, can take heart in a couple of government-sponsored projects aimed at corralling more equine activity and income for the state. The latest development, which could be a boon for the racing industry as well as for farms that raise horses for recreational riding, involves the proposed construction of a $60 million animal quarantine center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
By the time Seattle Slew arrived at Pimlico for the 102nd Preakness on May 21, 1977, the fairy tale was one-third told.A modest $17,500 purchase as a yearling, Seattle Slew had starred in the rags-to-riches story of winning the Kentucky Derby. His owners -- two fun-loving couples in their 30s dubbed the "Slew Crew" -- were the darlings of American racing.The nation's sports fans watched eagerly as Seattle Slew -- this dark-brown blaze of speed so awkward as a baby that his handlers called him "Baby Huey" after the clumsy comic-strip character -- tried to do what no horse had ever done: win the Triple Crown without having lost a race.
SPORTS
By JEFF BARKER AND BILL ORDINE and JEFF BARKER AND BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTERS | May 24, 2006
When Barbaro broke down during the Preakness Stakes, his owners held insurance to cover them in the event of a catastrophic injury to the horse, which was likely worth at least $25 million to $30 million - and more if he had won. Owners Roy and Gretchen Jackson had purchased two types of insurance on the prized colt: one for if the Kentucky Derby winner dies, and the other to protect them if he is unable to fulfill his potential as a stud, Roy Jackson said...
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi and William F. Zorzi,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
The General Assembly's budget chairmen approved yesterday the release of nearly $5 million in aid to horse owners and breeders, after a briefing by racing industry representatives on the status of improvements to Maryland's tracks. Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman and Del. Howard P. Rawlings, both Baltimore Democrats, had blocked the release of the money because of concerns over whether the track owners had made sufficient improvements in to the tracks, management and promotional activities. After a joint briefing before two budget subcommittees, Hoffman and Rawlings agreed to the release of the $4.9 million, which was approved last year on condition that track owners make the improvements.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The Howard County administration is backing off a proposal to revise the county code - with new rules regarding livestock on small properties and a new definition of a farm - after local horse owners raised an uproar about it. "I think they're getting phenomenal heat," said Susan Gray, a land-use attorney and horse owner who had opposed the changes. Gray and others said the revisions would have posed a threat not only to horse owners, but to 4-H clubs and all agriculture in the county.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Shug McGaughey, the trainer for Kentucky Derby winner Orb, attributes his calm demeanor since that race to maturity. Had he made it to the Preakness with a Triple Crown chance at a younger age, the 64-year-old insists, the scene would have been different. The kindly man in a sweater, face almost always softened in a sort of bemused wonderment, would be replaced by a high-strung, short-tempered barn general. Orb co-owner Stuart Janney III knows McGaughey feels some pressure. "Before the Derby, he had no color in his face," he said.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Dale Capuano winced at the sight of the 10 or so people watching the horse race at Laurel Park as he walked from the paddock into the 3,000-seat grandstand. Most were familiar faces. Out on the track, his filly, Calcutta Cat, reeled from a rough break — the horse next to her veered left sharply coming out of the gate — and finished sixth of eight horses. She was the only Maryland-bred horse in the race. Only 19 of the 80 horses entered in races that day had been foaled in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
- Thoroughbred racing is sometimes called the "sport of kings," but the horse owners and prospective owners sipping red wine at a reception the other night seemed too young to have ascended to an exalted level of royalty. Maybe they could symbolically be earls or viscounts. They looked like recent college graduates too old for the bar scene but too young to yet possess the graying, distinguished, moneyed look commonly associated with the sport's elite. But that was the point.
SPORTS
Sun Staff report | February 23, 2012
Prominent Maryland horse owner and breeder Sondra Bender died Wednesday afternoon after a battle with uterine cancer. She was 78 A resident of Bethesda, Bender and her husband Howard owned Glade Valley Farm in Frederick. “I considered her the first lady of Maryland racing,” Larry Murray, who has trained for Bender since 1988 and is the farm manager at Glade Valley, said in a news release. “She enjoyed the game and was very classy. She took the bad just as well as the good.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | December 30, 2011
The Maryland Hay Bank, an operation of the Mount Airy-based Gentle Giants Draft Horse Rescue, was among 15 organizations awarded a piece of $21,000 in grants this week from the Maryland Horse Industry Board. The Maryland Hay Bank assists private horse owners who are experiencing a financial hardship or a personal crisis with free hay for their horses for 30 days, up to a maximum of 100 total bales. The Maryland Hay Bank is donation driven, and hay is provided at no cost to recipients.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | May 16, 1998
As thrilling as it is to pick a winner, the point to the game is winning money. Toward that end, pay attention to the odds as they flicker on the tote board. If you have a good feeling about a horse that other bettors are shunning, consider yourself lucky and put a few bucks down. Conversely, don't be afraid to sit out a race in which you think the favorite will win, but pay little (remember: the favorite wins about 25 percent of the time).Look for value. If you can isolate two or three horses that you think have an equal shot at ending up in the money, bet the one with the longest odds.
SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | June 27, 1993
Karen Holloway, extension agent for agricultural science in Howard County, is celebrating her first year in the position. She came to the Howard extension office in July last year after several years in the same post in Allegany County."
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
It's deja vu for Maryland's thoroughbred racing industry. Less than three months before the 2012 season, the Maryland Jockey Club and the horsemen are at odds again and have yet to agree on the number of live racing days for next year. "We're staring at the barrel of a shotgun again," Louis Ulman, chairman of the Maryland Racing Commission, said Tuesday. Ulman had asked the Jockey Club and horse owners and breeders to provide an update at Tuesday's meeting about next year's racing schedule at Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore to avoid a similar situation to last year's, with the future of the sport and the storied Preakness Stakes in doubt.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
The Queen Anne's County state's attorney's office has filed criminal charges against the owner of a Centreville horse farm from which 140 animals were seized in April. Marsha H. Parkinson, 66, owner of Canterbury Farms, faces 35 animal cruelty charges of failure to provide adequate care for an animal, after the horses were taken from her Melfield Lane farm, according to electronic court records. Neither Parkinson nor Queen Anne's State's Attorney Lance G. Richardson returned calls seeking comment Tuesday afternoon.
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