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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
When jockey Chelsey Keiser rode Greentree Road, a 6-year-old gelding from Frederick, across the finish line to place second in the fourth race at Laurel Park on Thursday, she earned his owner 20 percent of the $15,000 purse, or $3,000. It was far from the biggest take on a sunny opening day of the 2013 fall meet, the 103rd for the storied track. But it made history. Thanks to a new incentive program aimed at revitalizing Maryland's sagging horse industry, Greentree Road also netted his breeders a bonus of 30 percent of its purse winnings - $900 - because the horse was born in the state.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Priscilla Fuller Menzies, an equine painter whose subjects included the fabled thoroughbreds Native Dancer and Secretariat, died of complications from a stroke Aug. 24 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The former Butler resident was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville and Upperco, she was the daughter of Perry Wade Fuller, a stamp and coin dealer, and Anita Sherwood Fuller, a sports enthusiast. She was a 1938 graduate of Garrison Forest School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied with Jacques Maroger, a French-born painter who explored the own paint medium using old techniques and had been on the staff of the Louvre.
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SPORTS
By John Scheinman, Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 3, 2012
With a sizable106 horses signed up to run in its 11 races, the 27th Jim McKay Maryland Million on Saturday at Laurel Park dodged a bullet considering the decline in the state's foal crop the past several years. Racing not only suffered in Maryland in the face of competition from neighboring states that fueled their programs with funds from alternative gaming such as slots and table games. The breeding industry did, as well. The Maryland Million, the second biggest day on the state racing calendar after the Preakness Stakes, spotlights race horses sired by stallions that stand in the state.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
This year's Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes have reminded America about what's great about horse racing. California Chrome has been a display of magnificence, and his story, and those of his trainer and owners, have been endearingly human. The mere possibility of the first Triple Crown winner in nearly four decades has rekindled the optimism that must be at the heart of every racing fan. But this year's Belmont Stakes has the potential to remind America about what's so maddening about horse racing.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
A 10-year deal signed Friday promises to stabilize Maryland's storied horse racing industry by encouraging capital improvements at Pimlico and Laurel Park and guaranteeing at least 100 live racing days each year, according to the state's track operators, horsemen and breeders. Under the agreement, Pimlico Race Course , home of the Preakness, the second jewel in the Triple Crown, and Laurel Park will remain open for year-round racing, training and stabling with at least 1,900 stalls through 2023.
NEWS
By Kevin George | May 16, 2007
Recently, the Maryland State Lottery introduced Racetrax, a new video game, at some 1,500 restaurants, bars, convenience stores and other easy-to-find places where gamers can bet on computer-animated horse races. The lottery's Web site claims Racetrax "offers the thrill of being at the track with the payout and prizes similar to live horse betting." Wonderful. Standardbred and thoroughbred owners and trainers are already handicapped because tracks in surrounding states are able to use slot machines.
SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | November 7, 1993
Preliminary data have been released on the University of Maryland's seven-county horse survey taken in Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Montgomery and Prince George's counties.The survey was to assess the composition, characteristics and economic impact of Maryland's equine industry.Almost 17,000 questionnaires were sent to households and private stables that were on more than 300 lists obtained from equine organizations. The response rates were 17.2 percent from households and 42.2 percent from stables.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2006
The Maryland Racing Commission gathered at David Hayden's Safely Home Farm, a division of Dark Hollow Farm, in Baltimore County yesterday and announced its new initiative, "KIM," as in "Keep It in Maryland." The "It" is the horse industry, everything from the breeders and owners to the farms and the good environment the industry creates with its commitment to open space. Commission chairman John McDaniel, secretary James Fielder and KIM task force chairman John Franzone stressed the importance of educating the legislature and the public about the impact the industry has with its 20,200 horse farms that provide jobs for more than 20,000 workers and cover 685,000 acres - nearly 10 percent of the land in Maryland.
NEWS
October 28, 1995
THE MOST INSPIRING athlete from Maryland these days? His name starts with a "C," he was born in Harford County and he has a streak going, but it isn't Cal Ripken. It's Cigar, the 5-year-old thoroughbred seeking his 12th straight win today at the Breeders' Cup Classic at Belmont Park.Although his owner hails from Kentucky and his trainer is in New York, Cigar was born in Maryland, at Country Life Farm near Bel Air. His success has become a rallying point for those who feel the state's historic connection to horse racing shouldn't be trampled by a rush toward casinos.
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2003
CHESAPEAKE CITY - Like the newborn foals she treats, Olga Smolenskaia-Souvorova is seeing Maryland for the first time. Smolenskaia-Souvorova is one of several members of Russia's horse industry who will spend months at horse farms and racetracks across the state this year, learning how the American industry operates and contributing their own ideas. "We'll try to see and learn everything that is going on," said Smolenskaia-Souvorova, an intern from Moscow. "I don't think that six months will be a long time."
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
When jockey Chelsey Keiser rode Greentree Road, a 6-year-old gelding from Frederick, across the finish line to place second in the fourth race at Laurel Park on Thursday, she earned his owner 20 percent of the $15,000 purse, or $3,000. It was far from the biggest take on a sunny opening day of the 2013 fall meet, the 103rd for the storied track. But it made history. Thanks to a new incentive program aimed at revitalizing Maryland's sagging horse industry, Greentree Road also netted his breeders a bonus of 30 percent of its purse winnings - $900 - because the horse was born in the state.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 18, 2013
It's not always in the Preakness Stakes, but every year, John Carroll graduate Nicole Stall urges her husband, trainer Al Stall Jr., to find a race for one of his horses on the third Saturday in May. This year, Departing gave Al Stall his second Preakness mount, finishing sixth in the nine-horse race while his wife and her family were treated to another memorable Preakness Day. “I used to always come growing up, and we try and run horses on...
NEWS
May 16, 2013
The Kentucky Derby winner and oddsmakers' favorite for the Preakness Stakes isn't exactly a Maryland horse, but he's close - Orb is partially owned by a Baltimore County businessman, and his sire spent some time in Harford County. Attendance at Saturday's races might or might not set an all-time record, but it's bound to be close - top-flight music acts, it seems, are a bigger draw than BYOB debauchery. The weather may not be perfect, but it will be close - the latest forecast is for a high of 72 but with a slight chance of showers.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Richard Golden became a savior of the Maryland thoroughbred horse breeding industry in 1988 when he teamed with Allaire du Pont and later Tom Bowman to open Northview Stallion Station in Chesapeake City, eventually revitalizing farmland that had been home to one of the most influential sires of all time, Northern Dancer. As Maryland's racing program crumbled and surrounding states boosted purses and the racetrack experience with slot machines, Golden became one of the state's most vocal critics.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
A 10-year deal signed Friday promises to stabilize Maryland's storied horse racing industry by encouraging capital improvements at Pimlico and Laurel Park and guaranteeing at least 100 live racing days each year, according to the state's track operators, horsemen and breeders. Under the agreement, Pimlico Race Course , home of the Preakness, the second jewel in the Triple Crown, and Laurel Park will remain open for year-round racing, training and stabling with at least 1,900 stalls through 2023.
SPORTS
By John Scheinman, Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 3, 2012
With a sizable106 horses signed up to run in its 11 races, the 27th Jim McKay Maryland Million on Saturday at Laurel Park dodged a bullet considering the decline in the state's foal crop the past several years. Racing not only suffered in Maryland in the face of competition from neighboring states that fueled their programs with funds from alternative gaming such as slots and table games. The breeding industry did, as well. The Maryland Million, the second biggest day on the state racing calendar after the Preakness Stakes, spotlights race horses sired by stallions that stand in the state.
NEWS
By John Lee Jr. and Grove Miller | March 21, 2004
IF THE $10.6 BILLION Maryland horse industry loses the race to have slots installed at racetracks, the state will lose jobs, tax revenue, recreational and tourist opportunities, beautiful open space and a big part of its heritage. Maryland horse farms are viable agricultural businesses. Agriculture is Maryland's No. 1 industry, and it includes: $5.2 billion worth of equine-related assets in Maryland. $3.9 billion worth of land, fencing and facilities owned by Maryland horse people. It comprises more than 685,000 acres, 10 percent of the state's land.
NEWS
April 25, 1996
Annapolis chamber plans trade show on May 23The Greater Annapolis Chamber of Commerce will sponsor its "Great Business Exchange," a trade show, from 10 a.m. to 5: 30 p.m. May 23 at Loews Annapolis Hotel.The speaker will be Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary. Seminar topics include "Doing Business on the Internet," "Nine Steps to the Perfect Market Plan" and "Growing Your Home Based Business."For information on renting a booth, call 268-7676.Cable program to feature impact of horse industry"It's Good Business," the cable television program produced by the Anne Arundel Trade Council and Jones Communications, will feature "The Horse Industry's Impact on Our Economy" this month.
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley scored the behind-the-scene tour most Preakness fans wish for: an up-close look at the 11 horses in the Stakes Stables. Tom Chuckas, president of the Maryland Jockey Club, walked the governor around the barns, packed high with hay and lined with flower baskets, that house the Preakness racers. O'Malley shook hands with the chiropractor and trainer for I'll Have Another. "He's ready to go," Larry "Thumper" Jones, the chiropractor, said of the Kentucky Derby winner.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | May 17, 2012
As many eyes in the sports world focus on Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore Saturday for the 139th running of the Preakness Stakes, it's comforting to know Harford County still has a place in horse racing. Bel Air's Country Life Farm, as Dewey Fox reminded our readers with his fine piece about the Pons family's operation in The Aegis Wednesday, is carrying on the horse breeding tradition that spans the past eight decades or so, helped out of late by the farm's part ownership of Malibu Moon, one of the top stallions in the country, who started his stud career at Country Life and now stands in Kentucky.
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