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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
The Columbia Council tentatively decided last night to freeze $132,000 in capital funds for the city's horse center -- rather than close it or lease it -- pending a comprehensive, outside review of the facility. The study, which could cost $25,000, would include a determination of the facility's selling price and the feasibility of selling it -- possibly to the county -- as well as an evaluation of how the center might operate more efficiently. The center, an 88-acre site off Gorman Road, has come under the 10-member council's scrutiny in the past year because of financial losses and sparse residential usage.
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NEWS
By MARY ELLEN SLAYTER and MARY ELLEN SLAYTER,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2006
The riders have helmets strapped tight under their chins and glossy boots up to their knees. Stacks of hay and bags of feed lean against the walls. All of the chatter in the stable is about my horse, my horse, my horse. Whose is the fastest? The gentlest? The smartest? But there's not a racetrack in sight. Or a racehorse, for that matter, at the Columbia Horse Center, a riding and boarding facility on 88 acres near Laurel. For all the attention given to racing's contributions to Maryland's economy, a significant part of the horse industry in the state is about recreation, not gambling.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
After more testimony from Columbia's equestrian enthusiasts, the Columbia Council voted last night to release $115,000 in impounded funds for improvements at the community's horse center.The money, budgeted for the fiscal year that begins May 1, will be used for fences, a tractor, barn windows, stalls and new jumps.The 10-member council has been debating the fate of the Columbia Horse Center for months because of concerns over its financial performance and its level of resident usage.The 88-acre facility on Gorman Road offers riding lessons and camps and a therapeutic riding program for the disabled.
NEWS
By Chris Yakaitis and Chris Yakaitis,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
On Sept. 7, Jessica Curry confronted her mother in the kitchen of their house in Crofton. She wanted to talk. She wanted to talk about Hurricane Katrina and figure out what she could do to help. And Sandy Curry suggested that her 17-year-old daughter raise money for relief efforts by sharing with others the passion she has held since childhood. Today at the Equilibrium Horse Center in Gambrills, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jessica Curry will learn just how much fruit her week-and-a-half of organizational and publicity efforts will bear.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
In another effort to improve operations at the Columbia Horse Center, the Columbia Council plans to discuss tonight the formation of a committee that will advise council members on policies, programs and expenditures at the facility.The idea for the advisory committee came out of a protracted debate this year over the finances and operations of the horse center, which offers lessons, boarding, horse shows and therapeutic riding for the disabled.The Columbia Association Horse Center Advisory Committee will consist of 10 members serving staggered two-year terms, according to the group's proposed charter.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
Closing or leasing the Columbia Horse Center based on its financial losses would set a precedent that could lead to the closure of other Columbia Association facilities and programs, an association vice president has warned the town council. In a report on the center's finances and operations released Friday, Rob Goldman of the association's sport and fitness division recommended that the homeowners group continue operating the facility, despite new projections showing it losing nearly $50,000 more in fiscal 2001 than was forecast in December.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2000
The Columbia Council has asked for another financial and management review of the Horse Center, and plans next month to weigh options, including closing it, selling it or using the property for something else. The council declined to discuss the Horse Center's fate at a budget work session yesterday. It plans to wait for a presentation on options for the facility at its next meeting, Feb. 10. "I think that we are going to explore all the alternatives," said Cecilia Januszkiewicz, the Long Reach council representative and the budget committee chairwoman.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2000
The vice chairman of the Columbia Horse Center advisory committee has resigned, questioning the competence of Columbia Association officials, who oversee the management and finances of the troubled facility. Daniel P. Bednarik -- the second committee member to resign this month after a staff shake-up -- said troubles at the horse center may be symptomatic of a larger problem at the Columbia Association, which provides services and operates facilities for city residents with a budget near $50 million.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
A new set of financial projections for the Horse Center shows the Columbia facility is expected to lose $48,000 more than was forecast in December, but officials are recommending that the Columbia Association continue running it rather than sell it or shut it down. The income and expense projections, released Friday to the Columbia Council, were the fifth set provided by CA staff in less than a year. They amount to another setback for the troubled facility, which is used by about 600 Columbia residents and has lost an estimated $1.5 million since 1986.
FEATURES
By Linda Geeson and Linda Geeson,Special to The Evening Sun | December 28, 1990
AT A CREST IN Frederick Road in western Baltimore County, a community of new houses has grown up within the past year. The rural setting and San Francisco-style homes may well justify the developers' claim that this is ''Paradise Hill.'' But for a group of blind children, a couple of teen-agers born with Downs Syndrome, and some senior citizens whose muscles refuse to stay as young as their minds, the real paradise in this part of town is across the street from the new houses, at a place called the Patapsco Horse Center.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
Tomorrow's Preakness Stakes may be an internationally known horse race, but at Howard County's struggling Columbia Horse Center, this year's event is more significant than usual. Two months into a tense struggle with a deadly equine virus, which has killed five horses with almost no warning and made five more ill, employees of the horse center and their supporters are fighting back as best they can - with a Preakness Day celebration they hope will boost morale. "This place is a community for so many kids.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
An unknown neurological illness has struck five horses at the Columbia Horse Center in Howard County, killing three and forcing the Columbia Association facility to close and impose a quarantine. Horse center operators and state agriculture officials said yesterday that they are awaiting the results of tests from autopsies done on two of the animals at the University of Maryland labs in College Park. "We're hoping we've got something by Friday," said acting state veterinarian Dr. James I. Fearer.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
Three years of controversy surrounding a 12-acre horse farm on the Broadneck Peninsula ended yesterday when Anne Arundel County officials and the former owner of the farm reached a settlement under which the county will build one, instead of two, ball fields at the property. Former owner Elizabeth Smith Gleaves sued the county to prevent construction of ball fields at the farm. She said county leaders had promised her the property would be used only for equestrian activities when she sold it to them in 1998.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2004
In his latest criticism of a controversial Anne Arundel park project, Comptroller William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that he remains disgusted with the county's decision to build ball fields at a horse farm on the Broadneck Peninsula. Schaefer, who has accused the county of reneging on an agreement with the former owner of the property, said in his opening remarks at a Board of Public Works meeting, "That's why people distrust government." Elizabeth Gleaves, the former owner, has said that when she sold the property - known as the Smith farm - to the county in 1998, she was promised the land would be used only for equestrian activities.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2004
William Donald Schaefer, A dispute over the fate of a 12-acre farm in Broadneck became tangled in the highest levels of state politics yesterday as the governor, the comptroller and the speaker of the House of Delegates all weighed in on Anne Arundel County's plans to build two athletic fields on the property. A long, emotional battle between Anne Arundel leaders and the former owner of the property boiled over at yesterday's Board of Public Works meeting, when Comptroller William Donald Schaefer questioned a county decision to build lighted ball fields at the farm.
NEWS
November 16, 2003
CA programs favor wealthier lien-payers I feel that the Columbia Association (CA) Board should address the matter of returning to the lien-payer some of the money collected as a result of the recent real property assessment. The operation of the outdoor pools, the open space, the golf courses, etc. is extremely costly. Note that some of those facilities are used by relatively few, mostly the affluent; for instance, each of the golf courses loses up to $150,000 annually. Additionally, the $800,000 required to refurbish the Hobbit's Glen Golf Course must be added to the revenue lost because that golf course is closed for renovations.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
An architectural consultant is surveying the Andover Equestrian Center in Linthicum and will draft a proposal for renovations that will include cost estimates by the end of this month, a spokeswoman for County Executive John G. Gary said yesterday.The consultant, Paul J. Clarke, a principal with Annapolis-based Colimore Clarke Associates, said he expects the renovations will be completed within a year. He toured the center Feb. 2 with Gary, Ritter, County Councilman George F. Bachman and officials from the county's departments of Recreation and Parks and Public Works.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
For the past seven years, Sandy Cantrall has boarded her horse Jeremy at Columbia Horse Center. And she says there were some days, years ago, when she didn't know what to expect when she went to visit. Sometimes the stalls were not properly cleaned or the horses were not appropriately attended to, she said. But since the Columbia Association leased the facility to a private contractor, Cantrall has become enthusiastic about the center. "I am so happy here," Cantrall said while atop her chestnut horse in one of the center's indoor rings.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
For the past seven years, Sandy Cantrall has boarded her horse Jeremy at the Columbia Horse Center. And she says there were some days, years ago, when she didn't know what to expect when she went to visit. Sometimes the stalls were not properly cleaned or the horses were not appropriately attended to, she said. But since the Columbia Association leased the facility to a private contractor, Cantrall has become enthusiastic about the center. "I am so happy here," Cantrall said while atop her chestnut horse in one of the center's indoor rings.
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