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NEWS
May 1, 2013
I disagree with the University of Maryland's Animal Science Department's decision to expand its horse-breeding program. There is a glut of unwanted horses and ponies across the country. Horse Rescue Farms are over-crowded and are turning away the no longer wanted animals for lack of space, feed, medication and shelter. Due to the economy and cost of keeping horses, owners are desperately trying to find homes for their no longer wanted horses, ponies, mules, and donkeys. Many are beloved pets or used for pleasure or racing or work or have outlived their purpose.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | January 5, 2014
Laurel Park Broad Rule repeats in Fire Plug Stakes Broad Rule ran down the speed and captured the $100,000 Fire Plug Stakes on Saturday at Laurel Park for the second year in a row. The Fire Plug was the last of four stakes races at Laurel Park on Saturday. Forest Boyce was at the controls aboard the Dickie Small trainee for the 33rd time in 34 career starts. "It worked out because the speed kind of blew the turn and it kind of opened up for us," said Boyce. "If you really have a good enough horse you'll get there one way or another.
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NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 2006
Last year genealogist Henry Peden hunkered down in the Historical Society of Harford County to conduct research for the latest in a long string of books he has written. For this project, he perused thick volumes of business licenses. He came across a batch of licenses granted to horse breeders, and the more he read, the more intrigued he became. Peden's mind raced as he soaked up details about horses with names such as Nicodemas, Mountain Boy, Orphan Boy, Paddy Whack and Oysterman. Eventually, it occurred to him that he could undertake a project that few, if any, researchers had undertaken: a book documenting the history of horse breeding in Harford.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
Nearly 650 mares were bred in Maryland this year, a 13 percent increase over 2012, and a surge in state slots gambling revenue could help raise the number again next year, according to the Maryland Horse Breeders Association. The gambling revenue has deepened racing purses and the pot of bonuses available for horses bred and sired in the state, driving the rebound from years of decline in the horse breeding and racing industries, officials said. The industries have launched an advertising campaign to promote the growth and encourage more of it. "Breed local, buy local, raise local," a voice booms amid the clip-clopping of hoofs on radio ads that will air around the region, unveiled at an event Friday near M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2003
A trio of Marylanders has joined with one of Kentucky's - and the world's - premier horse farms to build a thoroughbred breeding center in Maryland that they fervently believe can become the region's leading breeding operation. The venture, called Maryland Stallion Station, will be situated on 100 acres overlooking the historic and picturesque Sagamore Farm in the heart of Worthington Valley in Baltimore County. The partnership with Lane's End Farm near Lexington, Ky. - and Lane's End's owner, William S. Farish, the U.S. ambassador to Britain - lends instant prestige to what could become the most significant investment in Maryland horse breeding in more than a decade.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1998
As lovers and mates offer chocolates and hugs, another ritual of romance begins today on this most amorous of holidays.Valentine's Day is the traditional launch of the horse-breeding season. Beginning today, give or take a few days, randy sires at farms in every corner of the state will be led into barns where mares await a mating. The season traditionally ends July 4 -- presumably with fireworks."People always talk about the races," said Sissy Fisher, office manager of Corbett Farm in Monkton.
NEWS
By John Lee Jr. and Grove Miller | March 21, 2004
IF THE $10.6 BILLION Maryland horse industry loses the race to have slots installed at racetracks, the state will lose jobs, tax revenue, recreational and tourist opportunities, beautiful open space and a big part of its heritage. Maryland horse farms are viable agricultural businesses. Agriculture is Maryland's No. 1 industry, and it includes: $5.2 billion worth of equine-related assets in Maryland. $3.9 billion worth of land, fencing and facilities owned by Maryland horse people. It comprises more than 685,000 acres, 10 percent of the state's land.
NEWS
May 14, 1993
It's only a horse race, the way the Olympic Marathon is only a foot race. The eyes of the sporting, betting and horsey worlds will be on Old Hilltop tomorrow at 5:32 p.m. when a horseman's dozen of the best three-year-olds anywhere run counter-clockwise a mile and three-sixteenths for glory, fame, improvement of the breed and millions of dollars in purse and stud fees.It comes in those few magic days in Baltimore when the azaleas of a late spring are at their best, when every neighborhood and institution has a festive fete and when, with a little deftly applied shoe polish, every daisy is a black-eyed susan.
NEWS
November 25, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Mary M. Clark, an avid Maryland horse owner and breeder, will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church in Glyndon.Mrs. Clark, who was 84, died in her sleep Thanksgiving night at Glengar farm in Glyndon, where she lived with her husband, Henry S. Clark, a well-known horse trainer, and their son, Henry S. Clark III.A small woman of quick and generous wit, Mrs. Clark kept the accounts for her husband's horse breeding and training operation.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Billy Boniface is spending some restless nights as the clock winds down to Monday's scheduled end of the General Assembly session with no clear resolution on slots in sight. The outcome, he says, will have a profound effect on his family-owned thoroughbred horse breeding and training farm in Harford County. He sees slot-machine gambling as vital to the economic well-being of Maryland's horse industry. "We go to bed thinking about it," Boniface said. "We all thought by April 12 it would all be over with, and now we're told that it might not be over with then after all. We might be thinking about it when we go to bed at night for quite some time.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
I disagree with the University of Maryland's Animal Science Department's decision to expand its horse-breeding program. There is a glut of unwanted horses and ponies across the country. Horse Rescue Farms are over-crowded and are turning away the no longer wanted animals for lack of space, feed, medication and shelter. Due to the economy and cost of keeping horses, owners are desperately trying to find homes for their no longer wanted horses, ponies, mules, and donkeys. Many are beloved pets or used for pleasure or racing or work or have outlived their purpose.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
College junior Steve Moirano has no children of his own, but he played the proud parent Saturday as a pair of foals debuted to a crowd of onlookers at the University of Maryland campus farm. "What was it like?" Brandon Hurn, a sophomore chemical engineering student, asked Moirano, referring to a mare known as Amazin'. "Were you there?" "I actually pulled the foals out," answered Moirano, an animal sciences major planning to go into veterinary medicine. He and a few classmates were on hand to show off the foals - the first born on the farm in 30 years - and answer questions at Maryland Day, the university's annual campuswide showcase.
NEWS
December 23, 2009
A lthough the horse racing industry has convinced itself otherwise, it stands to be a major beneficiary of the decision by the Anne Arundel County Council to approve slot machine gambling at Arundel Mills Mall. The racing industry was singled out among all other industries and causes in the state to receive a share of the state's slot machine gambling revenue for purse enhancements, horse-breeding funds and capital improvements for the tracks. The racing industry's share is 9.5 percent of the gross proceeds from slots - that's more than local governments are getting - up to $140 million a year.
NEWS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
After working in the horse industry for nearly three decades, Cricket Goodall, executive director of the Maryland Horse Breeders' Association, is trying to navigate the 700-member organization through the most perilous of times for the state's thoroughbred interests. With Magna Entertainment - the Canadian-based owner of Maryland's two racetracks and the Preakness Stakes - filing for bankruptcy protection this month, the state's thoroughbred horse farms face an uncertain future. If there is no viable racing outlet in Maryland, that will accelerate the exodus of farms and horses to nearby states such as Pennsylvania, where racing industries are already bolstered by slot machine revenues.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2007
Eleanor O'Brien Edwards fondly recalls growing up around famed horses in Harford County in the 1940s and 1950s. On a recent afternoon, Edwards sat at the kitchen table in her Bel Air home, leafing through old photographs of horses and Prospect Hill, where she and her parents lived with the Heighe family, who were prominent in horse circles at the time. Edwards displayed horse racing records and scrapbooks filled with newspaper clippings and memorabilia. "It's important to the county and the horse industry that the people and events in these books and photographs aren't forgotten," she said.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | September 22, 2006
State officials plan to study the viability of locating a national animal quarantine facility at Fort Meade's shuttered equestrian center to serve the Mid-Atlantic region's bustling horse breeding industry. Legislation submitted Monday on behalf of the state Department of Agriculture asks the County Council to endorse state funding for a $60,000 study, which would explore creating what would be the fourth such facility in the country. The others are in Newburgh, N.Y., Miami and Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
When Anne Bennof retired from a 39-year career with the Association of American Railroads, the nearly lifelong Silver Spring resident knew that she wanted to move to Carroll County for one reason: so she could keep a horse in her back yard. Bennof and her husband, Marvin, have lived in Woodbine for eight years now. There, she rides and cares for her horse, Jesse, a retired harness racer, with easy access to wooded trails through Gillis Falls Reservoir. "My bottom-line wish was always to do exactly what I'm doing right now -- sit here and look out the back window and see my horse and take care of him myself," the 69-year-old Bennof said from a sunroom with sweeping views of the countryside and the paddock.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | September 10, 1991
The state of Maryland, facing a projected $300 million deficit next year and ordering government departments to trim all "fat" from their budgets, spent more than $50,000 Sunday to sponsor and lavishly entertain guests at a horse race at Pimlico.Not everyone is happy about it."Ludicrous and outrageous" is what Lance Cornine, executive director of the Maryland Classified Employees Association, which represents 28,000 state workers, said yesterday about the state's expenditure to sponsor "The State of Maryland Distaff Handicap" as part of the Maryland Million program.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 2006
Last year genealogist Henry Peden hunkered down in the Historical Society of Harford County to conduct research for the latest in a long string of books he has written. For this project, he perused thick volumes of business licenses. He came across a batch of licenses granted to horse breeders, and the more he read, the more intrigued he became. Peden's mind raced as he soaked up details about horses with names such as Nicodemas, Mountain Boy, Orphan Boy, Paddy Whack and Oysterman. Eventually, it occurred to him that he could undertake a project that few, if any, researchers had undertaken: a book documenting the history of horse breeding in Harford.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
William Boniface, retired racing editor of The Evening Sun and patriarch of a Maryland family whose horse-breeding successes included a winner of the Preakness Stakes, died of a liver disease yesterday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Churchville resident was 89. Mr. Boniface, who covered racing from 1937 until he retired in 1982, was a co-owner of 1983 Preakness winner Deputed Testamony. He also owned Bonita Farm, the Harford County horse-breeding operation now owned by his son, three grandsons, two great-grandsons and their wives.
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