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NEWS
January 15, 2012
Regarding the four U.S. Marines who desecrated the corpses of Taliban fighters, yes, what they did was vile and reprehensible ("Video of Marines defiling Taliban bodies stirs rage," Jan. 13). War seldom ensures that soldiers will act nobly. Just because they see brutality all around them, soldiers can become ignoble brutes themselves. When my brother was in Vietnam, he told me that some units that had suffered heavy casualties draped the bodies of dead Viet Cong fighters over the barrels of their tanks' guns until the corpses turned green.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
  Christian Siriano is going from Fashion Week to "Freak Show. " The "Project Runway" vet, who was born and raised in Annapolis and attended the Baltimore School for the Arts, will be using his keen fashion sense to judge a costume design competition tied to FX's horror-drama series "American Horror Story. " Announced today to celebrate the launch of "AHS's" fourth season, "Freak Show," the contest "invited participants with an eye for the unusual to design an original costume inspired by the series," according to a press release.
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NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | August 14, 1992
THE TWO children are the last survivors of their family, but not, it appears, for long.In news footage they sit naked on the ground, their spindly arms wrapped around one another, the inevitability of their imminent deaths in their sunken eyes.In their homeland, rent by internal power struggles, there is no food, and so they starve while worlds away the politicians puzzle over what to do.But these children are not in Bosnia, now the center of world attention.They are in Somalia, an African country living through -- and dying of -- a lethal combination of clan warfare, drought and famine thathas wrought what one U.S. official called the worst humanitarian crisis in the world right now. Millions of people in Somalia are in danger of starving to death in the months to come.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
Thank you to William L. Jacobsen Jr. for his commentary in The Baltimore Sun ( "President Hillary Clinton," July 31). As a woman reader of The Sun, I'm feeling as though this commentary is the first draft for one to be written on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. I'm also feeling that the same lingo about President Barack Obama will be a tagline for Ms. Clinton. If we didn't want Barack Obama to become president of the United States we are racist. If we don't want Hilary Clinton to be president of the United States we are misogynists.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | March 6, 2013
"Look out! Here comes Audrey II!!" A man-eating plant from outer space is arriving soon at Harford Technical High School. Harford Technical High School's Cobra Theatre Company will be presenting Howard Ashman and Alan Menken's campy musical "Little Shop of Horrors" in the William H. Amoss Performing Arts Center from March 22 to 24. This small, but talented cast will present the musical adaptation of the 1960s low-budget horror movie. The musical tells the story of Seymour Krelbourn, a down-and-out floral assistant at Mushnik's Flower Shop in urban Skid Row. Seymour becomes an overnight sensation when he discovers an exotic plant with a mysterious craving for fresh blood.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | August 9, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- Let's review what we got with the Sarbanes bill, so proudly declared by President Bush (who opposed the entire package until a few weeks ago) to be "the most far-reaching reform of American business practices since the time of Franklin Delano Roosevelt." This bill, which would never have seen the light of day had the stock market not tanked, fixes one of the Three Little Horrors that set up Enron Economics. Good on Senator Sarbanes and all who toiled with him to pass it. Lord knows, many years at the Texas Legislature have taught me how hard it is to pass a bill supported by no special interest, but only in the public interest.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kolieb | December 16, 2007
The ongoing crisis in Darfur is no genocide. In an age of 24-hour news channels, short attention spans and a long list of world crises, "genocide" remains headline-grabbing. But the term's application to Darfur is flawed in legal terms and unhelpful in resolving the crisis, and ultimately undermines worldwide efforts to prevent genocide. Genocide is one of the most disturbingly evocative terms in our vocabulary, and the gravest crime humanity knows. The 1948 Genocide Convention states that two criminal elements - physical and mental - must be proved: There must be actions aimed at or resulting in the deaths of members of a national, religious or ethnic group, and perpetrators of such acts must also have the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, the targeted group.
FEATURES
By Gregory N. Krolczyk and Gregory N. Krolczyk,Special to The Sun | December 14, 1994
Dean Koontz's first big foray into the "mainstream" was 1976's "Night Chills," a techno-horror thriller about mind control through subliminal suggestions. While Mr. Koontz did an excellent job overall, what made this novel especially effective was that something as insidious as subliminals really existed, and the events he depicted could actually come to pass.Now, 18 years later, Mr. Koontz has taken a whole new set of real-world horrors and set them to circumstances in "Dark Rivers of the Heart."
NEWS
By MARY ELLEN DOUGHERTY | October 15, 2003
WEST BALTIMORE, home of Hollins Market and the renovated Union Square, is also the home of The Corner and one of the major homicide districts of the city. I have lived there with another member of my religious community for 17 years. We have encountered everything people encounter in the city: drive-by murders, child mothers and teen-age gangs, a 6-year-old child propositioning passers-by, understanding only that there is money to be had by selling his body and that money will make him matter.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2003
When a soldier was shot in Renaissance Europe, a barber was frequently on hand to pouring scalding oil of elder over the wound. But when Ambroise Pare ran out during a French military campaign in 1530, he improvised by applying a cold salve of egg yolk, oil of rose and turpentine. To his surprise, the soldiers healed faster and suffered less -- and the old treatment faded into history. During amputations, Pare also found a safe way to stop soldiers from bleeding to death. Rather than searing the vessels with hot irons, a technique that was as likely to injure as heal, he pinched them with clamps and tied them off with sutures.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Baltimore City Councilman Robert W. Curran is tired of hearing about motorists whose cars were towed for reasons he finds ridiculous - for being parked outside the white lines in a supermarket lot, for instance, or at a fast food restaurant when the business was closed. So he's sponsoring legislation to spell out a narrow list of conditions for which a vehicle can be removed from private property. And he would cut the allowed towing fee by nearly half. "What they're doing is such a disincentive for people to come here and visit Baltimore," Curran said.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 17, 2014
Hannah Arendt coined the term "the banality of evil" to describe the galling normalcy of Nazi mass murderer Adolf Eichmann. Covering his trial in Jerusalem, she described Eichmann as less a cartoonish villain than a dull, remorseless, paper-pushing functionary just "doing his job. " The phrase "banality of evil" was instantly controversial, largely because it was misunderstood. Ms. Arendt was not trying to minimize Nazism's evil, but to capture its enormity. The staggering moral horror of the Holocaust was that it made complicity "normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
"I've made many painful mistakes in my life. I want my death to have some meaning. " -- Myrtle Snow "American Horror Story" wrapped its third season with a strong finale, focusing on themes of mortality and motherhood. The show got lost when it strayed from those ideas this year, often attempting to shock its audience, seemingly at the expense of cohesive plot and logic. But as the finale showed, when it wanted to, Coven could tell a compelling story, even without much of its trademark violence and gore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
"Eventually, everybody pays, everybody suffers. " -- Papa Legba In the last episode before its season finale, "American Horror Story: Coven" tightened its plot, while seemingly writing out three major players. For all of my complaints about its meandering storytelling and brutal violence, this is a show that knows how to tell a lean, sharp story when it needs to, and that was the case with "Go to Hell. " The brutal violence was still on display, but this was a fast-moving hour that set up the finale nicely.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
The recent commentary by Vincent DeMarco regarding the Affordable Care Act was a bad summary of the facts ("Don't forget the ACA's true purpose," Dec. 16). Let's remember the law's true purpose - a transfer of wealth to bring roughly one-seventh of the U.S. economy under government control. The commentary states that it's "about making health care more affordable for Marylanders," but this is not true. Marylanders will now pay greater premiums and higher deductibles for additional coverage they do not need, such as coverage for pregnancy on the policy of a 60-year-old female or a single male.
NEWS
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to The Sun | February 19, 1995
"Holy Hatred," a trendy report on religious conflicts around the world, illustrates a failure of method. James A. Haught, editor of the Charleston Gazette and its former religion reporter, states his purpose as showing how in the '90s " religion ... has taken the lead as the foremost contributing factor to hatred, war and terrorism." His method is to survey 25 countries in 237 pages, including maps and photographs drawing his horrors " From the international news wires of the Associated Press and the New York Times, and a few from other sources."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 12, 2001
Weinraub and Ruso, longtime friends who signed up for military duty together, can't wait to take on the Syrians. Regrettably, they have no clue what they're getting themselves into. Writer-director Amos Gitai's semi-autobiographical "Kippur" has plenty to say about the inevitable and unexpected horrors of war. But this strangely cold and distant film never offers anything beyond an intellectual understanding. It never allows its audience to experience the horrors viscerally - mostly because of a camera that resolutely keeps its distance.
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