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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | July 31, 2007
Avenue B is quiet today. Lines of giant sycamore trees, their branches swaying gently with the afternoon breeze, strain toward each other from opposite sides of the street. Rows of two-story frame houses stand in their shadows, chairs perched on the porches, children's toys strewn about the lawns, neatly tended planters filled with carefully cultivated flowers. But there's not a person in sight. Not a car moves up or down the street. No dogs bark; no cats meow. No radios blare. Newspapers lie unopened on the lawn.
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October 29, 2012
HCC Actors Guild will present "Silver Scream," a horror musical, on Nov. 9, 10 and 11 at 8 p.m in Harford Community College's Chesapeake Theater. This play has mature themes. JimmyO Burril's horror musical Silver Scream is a tribute to an era of genre cinema that's long since past. "Silver Scream" is a dark humored spoof of various horror films with musical production numbers. When a small town's movie theater goes out of business, the theater owner holds a final gathering where three unwitting victims are magically sucked into the realm of the movie screen, passing from horror movie to horror movie.
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January 4, 2008
One Missed Call, a horror movie about phone messages that herald grisly deaths, was not screened for critics.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Baltimore has a special interest in the new John Cusack movie "The Raven" as it tells the story of a man the city claims as its own: Edgar Allan Poe. (If they named the football team after his poem, he's got to be something, right?) The film depicts a 19th century Baltimore, but was filmed, much to the city's dismay, in Europe, where it just opened. It's due to play here next month, so as a public service, we thought we could tell you what reviewers across the pond thought.
EXPLORE
October 29, 2012
HCC Actors Guild will present "Silver Scream," a horror musical, on Nov. 9, 10 and 11 at 8 p.m in Harford Community College's Chesapeake Theater. This play has mature themes. JimmyO Burril's horror musical Silver Scream is a tribute to an era of genre cinema that's long since past. "Silver Scream" is a dark humored spoof of various horror films with musical production numbers. When a small town's movie theater goes out of business, the theater owner holds a final gathering where three unwitting victims are magically sucked into the realm of the movie screen, passing from horror movie to horror movie.
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By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,McClatchy-Tribune | May 25, 2007
Bug is being marketed as a horror movie, but it isn't a horror movie per se, although it has a number of horrific moments, and it burrows under your skin the way genuinely disturbing art sometimes does. Based on Tracy Letts' 2004 off-Broadway play, Bug was directed by William Friedkin, who made The Exorcist (and The French Connection and To Live and Die in L.A.) but more recently brought us The Hunted and Rules of Engagement and The Guardian, which was about an evil tree that eats babies.
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By [MATTHEW VENSEL] | July 8, 2007
Fans of horror flicks will enjoy the family-friendly Blobfest 2007 at the Colonial Theatre in Phoenixville, Pa. The event kicks off Friday night with a "running-out-of-the-theater" scene reenactment, as well as a live band, a tinfoil-hat competition, a scream contest and the Shorty Awards, recognizing the winners of a B-movie-filmmaking competition. There will also be a parade, a costume contest, classic cars, movie-showings, more music and guest appearances Saturday by people in the horror-movie industry.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 1998
At the heartless heart of Daniel MacIvor's "Monster" is a primal scene that makes his one-man show at the Theatre Project merit its title: An angry boy attacks his father at home, cuts off his limbs, but then somehow keeps dad's head and torso alive for several days by feeding him spaghetti.It's a scene right out of a horror movie. Come to think of it, it somewhat resembles Jennifer Lynch's 1993 movie "Boxing Helena," which involved a man's obsessive interest in spending time with a woman missing her arms and legs.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 5, 1991
Wes Craven (''Nightmare on Elm Street''), who wrote and directed ''The People Under the Stairs,'' says he was inspired to do this repugnant ''horror-comedy'' when he read a news story about a pair who kept their children prisoners in their home.''There's something about innocent children being held captive -- being abused by those they're supposed to look up to -- that touches a very large nerve in the collective psyche,'' he said. ''It seems to represent some sort of quintessential evil to most people.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 31, 1998
AFTER THE SMALL fry get done today -- trolling the neighborhood dressed in their cute little costumes and begging for goodies -- you might be inclined to ask yourself: "What's in this Halloween thing for me?"Adults are left to feast on a plethora of horror movies. Television serves them up throughout the month of October. For old-timers those of us over 40 -- television is the best bet. Current films offer nothing for fans of the horror movie genre.Look at what Hollywood gives us. One theme repeated at least a half-dozen times.
NEWS
By Faheem Younus | February 27, 2012
Watching Rick Santorum rise in the polls by positioning himself as the real Christian presidential candidate is like watching the sequel of a horror movie - one I literally lived through in the 1980s while growing up in Pakistan. There, another religious zealot, Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, played the lead role of the real Muslim. The plot went like this: The clerics called for candidates with "true" Muslim values, the masses demanded a "Muslim candidate for a Muslim state," the leaders proved their "Muslimness" by quoting scripture and calling others lesser Muslims, and the candidate who was able to appease the clergy privately and please the masses publicly held on to power.
FEATURES
January 4, 2008
One Missed Call, a horror movie about phone messages that herald grisly deaths, was not screened for critics.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | July 31, 2007
Avenue B is quiet today. Lines of giant sycamore trees, their branches swaying gently with the afternoon breeze, strain toward each other from opposite sides of the street. Rows of two-story frame houses stand in their shadows, chairs perched on the porches, children's toys strewn about the lawns, neatly tended planters filled with carefully cultivated flowers. But there's not a person in sight. Not a car moves up or down the street. No dogs bark; no cats meow. No radios blare. Newspapers lie unopened on the lawn.
TRAVEL
By [MATTHEW VENSEL] | July 8, 2007
Fans of horror flicks will enjoy the family-friendly Blobfest 2007 at the Colonial Theatre in Phoenixville, Pa. The event kicks off Friday night with a "running-out-of-the-theater" scene reenactment, as well as a live band, a tinfoil-hat competition, a scream contest and the Shorty Awards, recognizing the winners of a B-movie-filmmaking competition. There will also be a parade, a costume contest, classic cars, movie-showings, more music and guest appearances Saturday by people in the horror-movie industry.
FEATURES
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,McClatchy-Tribune | May 25, 2007
Bug is being marketed as a horror movie, but it isn't a horror movie per se, although it has a number of horrific moments, and it burrows under your skin the way genuinely disturbing art sometimes does. Based on Tracy Letts' 2004 off-Broadway play, Bug was directed by William Friedkin, who made The Exorcist (and The French Connection and To Live and Die in L.A.) but more recently brought us The Hunted and Rules of Engagement and The Guardian, which was about an evil tree that eats babies.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 9, 2006
The separation of church and state has grown ever-fuzzier in our civic life. Before things get even further out of hand, I'd like to propose a separation of church and state in our horror movies. I don't mean religion; good and evil, heaven and hell, souls saved and savaged are at the core of horror fiction. But when moviemakers exploit church traditions to give their ghouls and goblins higher tone, the holiness rings hollow. And few combinations are as unsavory as sanctimony and sensationalism.
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BY CHRIS KALTENBACH and BY CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 14, 2005
An occasional feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. You will not find a review of The Fog in today's Sun. Not because we critics were shirking our duties. The Fog isn't being reviewed here because the studio releasing it, Sony, chose not to screen it for critics. I guess the folks at Sony wanted to make at least a few bucks before what they saw as the inevitable negative reviews began appearing. It is, you have to admit, a strange way to express confidence in a movie and the filmmakers behind it. Preventing critics from seeing a film is a trick long used by studios.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Baltimore has a special interest in the new John Cusack movie "The Raven" as it tells the story of a man the city claims as its own: Edgar Allan Poe. (If they named the football team after his poem, he's got to be something, right?) The film depicts a 19th century Baltimore, but was filmed, much to the city's dismay, in Europe, where it just opened. It's due to play here next month, so as a public service, we thought we could tell you what reviewers across the pond thought.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | October 28, 2005
Whatever happened to horror flicks? In the 1970s they exerted a magnetic ray-gun pull on our most gifted moviemakers. In Jaws, Steven Spielberg's Great White Shark ignited deep dark childhood fears of the devil and the deep blue sea. In Carrie, Brian De Palma harrowed high-school terrors to their roots in volatile teenage sexuality (you may recall, Carrie achieved telekinetic powers when she began to menstruate). In Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Phil Kaufman's alien "pod people" - identical replacements of real human spouses, pals, lovers and colleagues - explosively dramatized and satirized the scary fluidity of "adult relationships" in the Me Decade.
FEATURES
BY CHRIS KALTENBACH and BY CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 14, 2005
An occasional feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. You will not find a review of The Fog in today's Sun. Not because we critics were shirking our duties. The Fog isn't being reviewed here because the studio releasing it, Sony, chose not to screen it for critics. I guess the folks at Sony wanted to make at least a few bucks before what they saw as the inevitable negative reviews began appearing. It is, you have to admit, a strange way to express confidence in a movie and the filmmakers behind it. Preventing critics from seeing a film is a trick long used by studios.
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