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By LAURA CHARLES | August 7, 1991
ALTHOUGH POP SINGER Patti LaBelle wowed the audiences at the new Pier Six Concert Pavilion this weekend, she surely didn't "wow" Mayor Kurt Schmoke Saturday night.The singer, in fact, stood up Hizzoner, who waited about 45 minutes to present her with a key to the city.When she finally appeared on stage to acknowledge his presence and was told the mayor had gone, an unabashed LaBelle turned to the audience and exclaimed: "I'm scared of that man!"SPEAKING OF SINGERS, don't forget to catch former Oriole turned Milwaukee Brewer Rick Dempsey tonight at Christopher's Timonium.
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FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2006
All summer, pundits have been trying to drive a wedge between "critics" and "audiences." Audiences go to the movies to have a good time. Critics go to furrow their brows and think esoteric thoughts. As A.O. Scott said from the bully pulpit of The New York Times, "We take entertainment very seriously, which is to say that we don't go to the movies for fun." That line should be as shocking to critics as it is damning to readers. How can you "take entertainment very seriously" and not go to the movies "for fun"?
FEATURES
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,sun reporter | October 26, 2007
He plays the role of Jigsaw, the twisted opportunist who puts strangers into intricate death traps, teaching them to value their lives. Actor Tobin Bell, with his piercing stare, worn features and menacing voice, has sent chills through even the most seasoned of horror-movie buffs in the first three installments of Saw. And he hopes to do it again as Saw IV opens today. But Bell's off-screen demeanor is a surprising departure from his intense and self-righteous onscreen alter-ego. The 65-year-old is more like the wise, yet easygoing, uncle who'd slip you a few bucks for ice cream -- even when your parents said no. His hobbies and family life help paint a picture of an average Joe. Bell, a nature-lover and married father of two, spends his spare time writing, coaching Little League baseball and reminiscing about his favorite pro baseball moments on his personal blog.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 21, 2006
Parents, please: If your juvenile entourage is screaming or complaining that a movie is too scary, let your children go - and you will earn the thanks of every adult sitting around you. You may even wind up with a happier, healthier child. At a preview showing of Monster House, a little girl started whimpering in the opening minutes. Why wouldn't she? In the first scene, a cadaverous old man with terrifying teeth and spooky eyes seizes a child's tricycle, breaks off the front wheel and then tosses it inside the title house.
FEATURES
BY CHRIS KALTENBACH and BY CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 14, 2005
An occasional feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. You will not find a review of The Fog in today's Sun. Not because we critics were shirking our duties. The Fog isn't being reviewed here because the studio releasing it, Sony, chose not to screen it for critics. I guess the folks at Sony wanted to make at least a few bucks before what they saw as the inevitable negative reviews began appearing. It is, you have to admit, a strange way to express confidence in a movie and the filmmakers behind it. Preventing critics from seeing a film is a trick long used by studios.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | August 18, 2006
The Wednesday night film series at St. Thomas Aquinas Church, West 37th Street and Roland Avenue, wraps next week with the 1936 version of Show Boat, adapted from the groundbreaking Broadway play. Based on a novel by Edna Ferber, the movie stars Irene Dunne, Allan Jones, Charles Winninger and Paul Robeson as some of the crew and performers on a showboat sailing the Mississippi over a number of years and through a number of traumatic personal stories. This will be the last show in the Wednesday night film series, as its host, the Rev. George Restrepo, S.J., will be leaving St. Thomas Aquinas next week.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009
ARTS Cuba's art movement The contemporary art movement in Cuba will be the subject of a discussion and talk featuring curator Ana Joa and photographer Vince Gragg from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Sunday at Galerie Myrtis, 2224 N. Charles St. The talk is held in connection with the current show at the gallery, Cuba: The Island and Its People, which runs through Jan. 11. Go to galeriemyrtis.com. FILM 'One Foot In the Grave' Boasting influences that range from the classic Hammer horror films featuring Christopher Lee to a pompous writing instructor, director Chris LaMartina, homegrown Baltimore horror specialist, has scheduled the debut of One Foot In the Grave tomorrow night at the Creative Alliance.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DAVIS | February 2, 1992
"What are you going to do with that collection of Playbills?" we ask Lou Cedrone, who's busily stacking and arranging them, just so. "They're going to the Enoch Pratt Free Library," he says with pride, satisfied that his years of carefully filing and protecting these programs wasn't for naught.This was just a few days before he wrote his final column as film and theater critic for The Evening Sun, a tenure that began at a quarter to Jayne Mansfield and ends at half past Madonna. After 40 years at the newspaper, 28 of them as its critic, Lou Cedrone bids adieu to Calvert and Centre streets, the crossroads where he wrote thousands of movie, stage and television reviews for Baltimore's afternoon newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helen B. Jones and Mary Carole McCauley | August 15, 2002
Festivals JAM Reggae Festival at Clifton Park Last weekend the Trinidad and Tobago Days festival rocked Clifton Park. This weekend, the annual JAM Reggae Festival does the honors. Enjoy music by reggae bands (Jah Works, pictured, Dema Roots and Strykers Posse, among them), arts and crafts, ethnic food and drinks, kids' games, folk dancing and more. Hours are 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. tomorrow and noon to 10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free tomorrow, $7 Saturday and $10 Sunday. Children under 12 are free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
One movie features rapid-fire sequences of cannibalism, civil warfare and mass destruction. The other chronicles a man's pain as he endures horrific torture and abuse. Both are extremely violent. Both have gruesome outcomes. But why did the latter, The Passion of the Christ, incite heated debate (religion aside) over its violent content and rating while the similarly R-rated Dawn of the Dead was greeted with a wink, a giggle and a box-office run that pushed it past Passion this week to No. 1 in the land?
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