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By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 17, 2002
Silver Scream, an original musical comedy, opens tomorrow at the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. A campy take on horror movies from Bride of Frankenstein to The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, the musical has a script by Baltimore's JimmyO Burril -- who is currently shooting a film version -- and a score by Florida-based songwriter James M. Taylor. The 14-member cast is directed by Ronald Burr and Dahlia Kaminsky; musical direction is by Fuzz Roark. The show is not recommended for young children.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
For five days ending Sunday, thousands of film fans and scores of filmmakers watched movies together at the 15th Maryland Film Festival. From three-minute comedic shorts promoting horror films to gripping documentaries about the rise of Napster and cutting-edge narrative features about the relationship between a teacher and one of her students, the festival offered local cineastes the chance to lose themselves in the boundless possibilities of film....
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August 8, 1991
MENACING giant spiders, large mole-like people from subterranean depths, a gangster brain from outer space set out to conquer Earth are the creatures that have made movie actor John Agar a cult figure to thousands of science-fiction/horror fans.For FANEX reservations and further details, call 665-1198.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
"Lovely Molly," the horrific tale of a woman either demonically possessed or tragically insane, may be the film that makes Eduardo Sanchez someone other than one of the guys responsible for 1999's "The Blair Witch Project. " Which would be fine with the Maryland-raised filmmaker, whose movie gets its local premiere tonight to cap the first day of the 14th Maryland Film Festival. "I love being one of the guys that did 'Blair Witch,' but I'm really proud of 'Lovely Molly,'" Sanchez, 44, said about the film he shot last fall in and around Hagerstown.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions about the publisher of books on horror films incorrectly identified the role played by Boris Karloff in the 1931 movie, "Frankenstein," and a correction that appeared yesterday also erred in stating actors' roles in the film.In fact, Colin Clive portrayed Dr. Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff had the role of Frankenstein's monster.The Sun regrets the errors.A story in Saturday's editions of The Sun about the publisher of books about horror films incorrectly identified the actor who plays Frankenstein in the 1931 movie by the same name.
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By Michael Sragow | November 20, 2009
Paranormal Activity . ( 3 STARS) Now that the lines have dwindled, moviegoers who don't usually see horror films should take a chance on this clever, bare-bones scare film about a haunted girl and the hubris-blighted boyfriend who tries to capture her demon on his digital camera. Every rustle of a breeze or a sheet causes a big stir in the audience. Opening Wednesday The Fantastic Mr. Fox : (Fox Searchlight) Based on the story by Roald Dahl, the noble and charming Mr. Fox uses his wits and cunning to outfox three dimwitted farmers.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2000
VLADIMIR MARINICH does a pretty good imitation of Frankenstein's monster. Just ask the 30 people who attended his lecture on the history of horror films as part of First Arts 2000 -- a showcase of the arts held Saturday at Howard Community College in Columbia. About 400 people attended such workshops, activities and performances as two children's operas, an open rehearsal of "The Mystery of Irma Vep," the HCC Jazz Ensemble and Native American poet Edgar Gabriel Silex, said Joan Phillippi, coordinator of the event.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 31, 1998
AFTER THE SMALL fry get done today -- trolling the neighborhood dressed in their cute little costumes and begging for goodies -- you might be inclined to ask yourself: "What's in this Halloween thing for me?"Adults are left to feast on a plethora of horror movies. Television serves them up throughout the month of October. For old-timers those of us over 40 -- television is the best bet. Current films offer nothing for fans of the horror movie genre.Look at what Hollywood gives us. One theme repeated at least a half-dozen times.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 12, 1990
''Child's Play 2'' isn't as dumb as most horror films, and it isn't as gory as most. It is, however, as silly and irresponsible as most.Murder, the movie says, is fun. When you kill, you make jokes about it.''Child's Play 2'' follows on the success of the original film that was released two years ago. In the first, a doll, possessed by the soul of a murderer, tried to take over the body of a small boy.Chucky, the doll in both films, didn't do much talking...
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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 1, 1997
One of the first great horror flicks gets an airing on TCM tonight.From 1919, "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m.) is the story of a sinister doctor and his traveling freak show, which includes a sleepwalker (Conrad Veidt, who 23 years later would turn up as the evil Maj. Strasser in "Casablanca") he uses to murderous effect.The story is serviceable enough, with a gotcha ending that's a classic, and Werner Krauss as the demented Caligari is fairly horrific. But the real stars here are the sets: "Caligari" marked the height of German expressionism in cinema, complete with sets that look like the products of a deranged mind, with jagged edges and vaulted ceilings that meander this way and that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Region | April 18, 2012
Last week in the O.C., Sarah had a meltdown, Tamra downsized to itty-bitties, and Jim had a "come to Jesus" dinner with Alexis. And Jesus told Jim to tell Alexis to quit Fox 5. Turns out Jim may not be that far off - tonight's episode may actually signify the Second Coming because Vicki finally admits she owes someone 50 percent of an apology, and the ladies spend the night somewhere other than a Ritz-Carlton hotel. I believe these are the first two signs of the Apocalypse.  Remember the good ol' days when watching "Real Housewives" meant an inside peek into the daily lives of well-off women?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
A 250-year-old farmhouse, stuck at the end of a long, rutted driveway, with creaking doors, splintered stairs, snakeskins in the basement and a mysterious gaping hole hidden beneath one of the outbuildings. Sounds like the perfect setting for a horror film, right? That's what the makers of "The Possession" thought, too, when they first saw the Hagerstown home that location scouts found for their 20-day film shoot, wrapping this weekend in Western Maryland. And they were right. "This house had its own creepy kind of things that it brought along," says director Eduardo Sanchez, a Marylander who shot to fame as the first-time writer-director of 1999's "The Blair Witch Project," which brought in more than $140 million at the U.S. box office.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 20, 2009
Paranormal Activity . ( 3 STARS) Now that the lines have dwindled, moviegoers who don't usually see horror films should take a chance on this clever, bare-bones scare film about a haunted girl and the hubris-blighted boyfriend who tries to capture her demon on his digital camera. Every rustle of a breeze or a sheet causes a big stir in the audience. Opening Wednesday The Fantastic Mr. Fox : (Fox Searchlight) Based on the story by Roald Dahl, the noble and charming Mr. Fox uses his wits and cunning to outfox three dimwitted farmers.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Unless your goal is to become a scream queen the way Jamie Lee Curtis did in Halloween, it's not easy to boost your career acting in any kind of horror film. When the protagonist commits deeds sure to damn a soul or at least imperil a body, the actor must remain sympathetic or intriguing enough to get an audience screaming "Don't open that door!" - or, as I heard during the original Prom Night, "Don't step on that head!" If gore-soaked thespians are able to do even more than that, and create multidimensional characters in extreme conditions, their future is assured.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009
ARTS Cuba's art movement The contemporary art movement in Cuba will be the subject of a discussion and talk featuring curator Ana Joa and photographer Vince Gragg from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Sunday at Galerie Myrtis, 2224 N. Charles St. The talk is held in connection with the current show at the gallery, Cuba: The Island and Its People, which runs through Jan. 11. Go to galeriemyrtis.com. FILM 'One Foot In the Grave' Boasting influences that range from the classic Hammer horror films featuring Christopher Lee to a pompous writing instructor, director Chris LaMartina, homegrown Baltimore horror specialist, has scheduled the debut of One Foot In the Grave tomorrow night at the Creative Alliance.
NEWS
By Geoff Boucher | November 11, 2007
The second annual After Dark HorrorFest landed in theaters this weekend with a national splatter. The six-day, eight-film festival -- which began Friday and runs until Nov. 18 -- will bring its collective charms (which include cannibals, Mexican cult killers, spooks, were-rats, a raging mystery virus and enough fake blood to fill a tanker truck) to about 300 U.S. screens. That makes HorrorFest (aka "8 Films to Die For") a world-class festival -- a sort of super-sized Sundance for sadism.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | August 7, 1991
ALTHOUGH POP SINGER Patti LaBelle wowed the audiences at the new Pier Six Concert Pavilion this weekend, she surely didn't "wow" Mayor Kurt Schmoke Saturday night.The singer, in fact, stood up Hizzoner, who waited about 45 minutes to present her with a key to the city.When she finally appeared on stage to acknowledge his presence and was told the mayor had gone, an unabashed LaBelle turned to the audience and exclaimed: "I'm scared of that man!"SPEAKING OF SINGERS, don't forget to catch former Oriole turned Milwaukee Brewer Rick Dempsey tonight at Christopher's Timonium.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2006
All summer, pundits have been trying to drive a wedge between "critics" and "audiences." Audiences go to the movies to have a good time. Critics go to furrow their brows and think esoteric thoughts. As A.O. Scott said from the bully pulpit of The New York Times, "We take entertainment very seriously, which is to say that we don't go to the movies for fun." That line should be as shocking to critics as it is damning to readers. How can you "take entertainment very seriously" and not go to the movies "for fun"?
FEATURES
By Robert Abele | November 9, 2007
If the horror film P2 sounds like a sequel even when it isn't - the title refers to where you might have left your car - it still has the feeling of something done many times before. Granted, the notion of a subterranean parking garage as concrete, oil-stained circles of hell is a serviceable enough genre idea for geographic suspense. But this dull story of a bent underground security guard (Wes Bentley) obsessed with a beautiful executive (Rachel Nichols) many floors above quickly devolves to little more than a strained effort in trapping, terrorizing and - because no modern chiller can seemingly do without it - torture from director/co-writer Franck Khalfoun and co-writer/producer Alexandre Aja (The Hills Have Eyes)
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By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,sun reporter | October 26, 2007
He plays the role of Jigsaw, the twisted opportunist who puts strangers into intricate death traps, teaching them to value their lives. Actor Tobin Bell, with his piercing stare, worn features and menacing voice, has sent chills through even the most seasoned of horror-movie buffs in the first three installments of Saw. And he hopes to do it again as Saw IV opens today. But Bell's off-screen demeanor is a surprising departure from his intense and self-righteous onscreen alter-ego. The 65-year-old is more like the wise, yet easygoing, uncle who'd slip you a few bucks for ice cream -- even when your parents said no. His hobbies and family life help paint a picture of an average Joe. Bell, a nature-lover and married father of two, spends his spare time writing, coaching Little League baseball and reminiscing about his favorite pro baseball moments on his personal blog.
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