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NEWS
March 7, 2003
On Wednesday, March 5, 2003, STANLEY HORNSTEIN, beloved husband of the late Ruth Hornstein (nee Freedman); devoted father of Joyce Sapperstein of Baltimore, MD; dear father-in-law of Dr. Arnold Sapperstein; devoted brother of Dr. Calvin Hornstein of Hallandale FL, Florine Waxman of Hillsboro FL, and the late Bernice Paper; beloved companion of Betty Silverman. Loving grandfather of Jayme and Steven Weinstein, Lisa and Barry Stoler; loving great-grandfather of Jordan, Zachary and Eric Weinstein, Bradley and Brooke Garfield, Travis, Garrett and Lindsay Stoler.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Jacob D. "Jake" Hornstein, who practiced law in Baltimore for 67 years, died Feb. 8 at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of severe brain trauma after a fall. He was 92. "He was a fine gentleman and was well-versed in the law. He was also very bright," said Sidney Schlachman, a partner in the firm of Schlachman, Belsky & Weiner, who had known Mr. Hornstein for nearly 60 years. "He had a fine reputation with other attorneys, and anytime you can say he was a lawyer and a gentleman, that's saying something.
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NEWS
September 15, 1991
Alan D. Hornstein of Columbia has been named acting dean of the University of Maryland Law School by President Errol L. Reese, effective Sept. 1.Hornstein, an associate dean and professor, is the authorof "Appellate Advocacy in a Nutshell" and several journal articles. He also serves as special consultant to the Evidence Rules Subcommittee of the Rules Committee for the Maryland Court of Appeals.He succeeds Michael J. Kelly.DAVIS IS REGIONAL VPSusan Davis, coordinator of video services at Howard Community College, has beenelected regional vice-president of the Texas-based International Television Association.
NEWS
October 21, 2008
Minna Hornstein Memorial service will be held at North Oaks, The Parlor, 725 Mt. Wilson Lane, Pikesville, Md. Wednesday October 22, 2008 at 10:30 A.M. The family will sit Shiva at the home of Jill and Phil Rudich, 6526 Deer Park Rd., Reisterstown, MD from 1 to 5 P.M. following the memorial service. In lieu of flowers please send donations to Miriam Lodge KSB c/o Miriam Friendlich, 3420 Associated Way #221, Owings Mills, Md. 21117.
NEWS
March 10, 2003
Stanley B. Hornstein, a retired insurance broker, died Wednesday of a stroke at Northwest Hospital Center. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on Anoka Avenue, he was a 1938 City College graduate, where, as president of the Debate Club, he was known as the "Silver-Tongued Orator." As a teen-ager, he played the bugle for the Sons of the American Legion Drum and Bugle Club. He remained active in City College alumni affairs. Mr. Hornstein, who earned a Certified Life Underwriter certificate through the Johns Hopkins University, was an agent for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. and later started his own firm, Insurance Originators, on Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2002
Leon Hornstein Sr., whose repair skills kept vintage phonographs spinning 45-rpm and 33-rpm records while earning him the sobriquet "The Record Changer Doctor," died of cancer Saturday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 90. A longtime Pikesville resident. Mr. Hornstein was born in Baltimore and raised on Whitelock Street. He left Forest Park High School at 16, believing that the school had nothing more to teach him, family members said. Largely self-educated, Mr. Hornstein attended night classes at the Johns Hopkins University while continuing to read widely in electronics, history, music, photography, lapidary and jewelry making.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 1997
"An iris was just another flower to me, before I met Bruce Hornstein: a purple flower at the end of a long, green stick."The speaker is Anne Haley, whose pets were patients of Dr. Hornstein, a retired veterinarian, for five years. She adds: "I was surprised that a vet would also be such an avid gardener, but he came out to our garden club [Mount Washington] and gave a program on irises for us. It just made it come alive for me. He was wonderful."Some Sundays, Hornstein can be found at the Farmers' Market behind the Bob Evans Restaurant on Belair South Parkway at Route 24, about three miles south of Bel Air. There his mission is not simply to sell some of the many flowers he grows, but to share their beauty with passers-by and educate all who care to hear about the hardy, colorful perennials.
NEWS
By Kim Clark | October 6, 1991
When he was 11 years old, Arnold Hornstein tried to break in to a neighborhood car dealership. The new 1961 Chevrolet Biscaynes and Bel Airs were hidden under tarps on the lot, ready for the ritual autumn unveiling. And Arnold was crazy for an early peek.On a morning 31 years later, Mr. Hornstein sips coffee while he surveys another Chevrolet lot, lined with 1992 Cavaliers and Corvettes.There are no tarps. No secrets.And no customers."This used to be a big event," says Mr. Hornstein, a salesman at Fox Chevrolet in Woodlawn for 13 years.
NEWS
August 8, 1996
Betty S. Hornstein, 64, volunteer in several groupsBetty S. Hornstein, a longtime volunteer, died of cancer yesterday at her home in Stevenson. She was 64.Born Betty Spiegelberg in New York, she moved to Maryland in 1949 to attend Goucher College and graduated in 1953. While at Goucher, she married Jacob Hornstein in 1951.After graduation, she became a volunteer, including stints with the National Council of Jewish Women, the Central Scholarship Bureau and the Maryland Department of Human Resources advisory council, to which she was appointed by then Gov. Harry Hughes.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | June 19, 2007
Here are a few phrases I hear all too often: It won't change anything. They won't care. It's too much trouble. It takes too much time. You can't expect much. Why bother? I'll confess I've been guilty of using those excuses, too, when confounded by my own consumer problems. Recently, for example, I encountered bad service at four different locations of the same home improvement business and, instead of calling or writing someone to resolve my complaints, I just brushed it off because I was pressed for time.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | June 19, 2007
Here are a few phrases I hear all too often: It won't change anything. They won't care. It's too much trouble. It takes too much time. You can't expect much. Why bother? I'll confess I've been guilty of using those excuses, too, when confounded by my own consumer problems. Recently, for example, I encountered bad service at four different locations of the same home improvement business and, instead of calling or writing someone to resolve my complaints, I just brushed it off because I was pressed for time.
NEWS
March 10, 2003
Stanley B. Hornstein, a retired insurance broker, died Wednesday of a stroke at Northwest Hospital Center. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on Anoka Avenue, he was a 1938 City College graduate, where, as president of the Debate Club, he was known as the "Silver-Tongued Orator." As a teen-ager, he played the bugle for the Sons of the American Legion Drum and Bugle Club. He remained active in City College alumni affairs. Mr. Hornstein, who earned a Certified Life Underwriter certificate through the Johns Hopkins University, was an agent for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. and later started his own firm, Insurance Originators, on Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2002
Leon Hornstein Sr., whose repair skills kept vintage phonographs spinning 45-rpm and 33-rpm records while earning him the sobriquet "The Record Changer Doctor," died of cancer Saturday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 90. A longtime Pikesville resident. Mr. Hornstein was born in Baltimore and raised on Whitelock Street. He left Forest Park High School at 16, believing that the school had nothing more to teach him, family members said. Largely self-educated, Mr. Hornstein attended night classes at the Johns Hopkins University while continuing to read widely in electronics, history, music, photography, lapidary and jewelry making.
NEWS
May 31, 2000
Etta K. Hornstein, 92 homemaker, volunteer Etta K. Hornstein, a homemaker and longtime volunteer, died Monday in her sleep at Catered Living of Pikesville. She was 92. The former resident of Ashburton and Wynnewood Towers had returned to Baltimore in 1998 from Longboat Key, Fla., where she had lived for 25 years. Locally, she had been president of the Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital Auxiliary and division chairman of the Women's Division of the Associated Jewish Charities.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 1997
"An iris was just another flower to me, before I met Bruce Hornstein: a purple flower at the end of a long, green stick."The speaker is Anne Haley, whose pets were patients of Dr. Hornstein, a retired veterinarian, for five years. She adds: "I was surprised that a vet would also be such an avid gardener, but he came out to our garden club [Mount Washington] and gave a program on irises for us. It just made it come alive for me. He was wonderful."Some Sundays, Hornstein can be found at the Farmers' Market behind the Bob Evans Restaurant on Belair South Parkway at Route 24, about three miles south of Bel Air. There his mission is not simply to sell some of the many flowers he grows, but to share their beauty with passers-by and educate all who care to hear about the hardy, colorful perennials.
NEWS
August 8, 1996
Betty S. Hornstein, 64, volunteer in several groupsBetty S. Hornstein, a longtime volunteer, died of cancer yesterday at her home in Stevenson. She was 64.Born Betty Spiegelberg in New York, she moved to Maryland in 1949 to attend Goucher College and graduated in 1953. While at Goucher, she married Jacob Hornstein in 1951.After graduation, she became a volunteer, including stints with the National Council of Jewish Women, the Central Scholarship Bureau and the Maryland Department of Human Resources advisory council, to which she was appointed by then Gov. Harry Hughes.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
A suspected interstate drug dealer was to appear at a bail hearing in U.S. District Court today following his arrest yesterday on a Pimlico street on a warrant charging him with possession of heroin with intent to distribute, said a spokesman for a federal drug agency.Arrested by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents and city police around 6:30 p.m. in the 4500 block of Park Heights Ave. was Frederick Douglas Brooks 3rd, 27, whose last known address was the 2900 block of Huntingdon Ave. in north Baltimore.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
A suspected interstate drug dealer was to appear at a bail hearing in U.S. District Court today following his arrest yesterday on a Pimlico street on a warrant charging him with possession of heroin with intent to distribute, said a spokesman for a federal drug agency.Arrested by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents and city police around 6:30 p.m. in the 4500 block of Park Heights Ave. was Frederick Douglas Brooks 3rd, 27, whose last known address was the 2900 block of Huntingdon Ave. in north Baltimore.
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