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By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
GREENBELT -- A federal judge barred former Prince George's County schools Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby yesterday from contacting any current or former employees of the school system where he is alleged to have engineered a financial scheme to enrich himself. Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael R. Pauze asked Magistrate Judge Charles B. Day for the restriction. Hornsby's lawyer Robert C. Bonsib called the restriction overly broad, and government officials said later that they might tailor the order to affect a more limited number of employees.
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NEWS
May 6, 2014
In a recent sports report you listed the second basemen of each franchise who hit more than 100 home runs ("Ranking the American League East: Who has the best second baseman?," March 13). Yet you stated the St. Louis Cardinals had none. Really? Has no one on your staff ever heard of Rogers Hornsby, who had over 190 for the Cardinals and was the first major league player to reach 100 and 200 in his career? Come on, just open a baseball encyclopedia. Keith P. DiNardo - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2007
Undaunted by a deadlocked jury that could not reach a decision in the public corruption trial of the former Prince George's County schools chief, federal prosecutors in Maryland announced yesterday that they will retry Andre Hornsby, starting June 10. The first trial in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt ended Nov. 28 without a verdict after jurors remained divided in the kickback case. Prosecutors charged Hornsby more than a year ago with accepting kickbacks from an educational software saleswoman.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
Greenbelt - Former Prince George's County schools Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby was sentenced yesterday to a total of six years of prison time in a federal corruption case. "I'm totally embarrassed by what situation I've put myself into," Hornsby told U.S. District Judge Peter J. Messite. "I understand the seriousness of my actions. I understand mistakes were made. I understand decisions were made. This has taken a toll on myself, my family, my friends and my colleagues." Messite also directed Hornsby to serve three years of supervised release after he leaves prison and pay a $20,000 fine and $70,000 in restitution to the Prince George's schools.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Maybe the Grateful Dead and Bruce Hornsby have more in common than most fans thought when the piano player joined their tour last year for a handful of shows.In the same spirit of Dead concerts for more than two decades, last night at Merriweather Post Pavilion Hornsby informed the crowd after the first song that "there are no song lists for any of our shows." He also asked security to back off for the evening and "let the crowd dance or do whatever they want. They pay a lot of money for these tickets."
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
The Prince George's County school board was briefed behind closed doors yesterday morning on the results of a six-month audit it commissioned into dealings involving education vendors and the district's former chief, who resigned last weekend. The former superintendent, Andre J. Hornsby, has 48 hours to respond to the audit under an agreement reached between him and the board at the time of his resignation, which also included a $125,000 severance payment. The board is then expected to make the report public tomorrow afternoon.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 30, 2007
It's not quite up there with the classic of the genre, the she-set-me-up tape that captured then-D.C. Mayor Marion Berry smoking crack in a hotel room. No, the gotcha tape of Andre J. Hornsby pocketing $1,000 from a government contractor in a room at the Bowie Comfort Inn isn't quite so dramatic. In fact, it's the casualness of the scene - the former Prince George's County schools superintendent actually says "whatever" when the contractor tries to confirm how much more she owes him for steering government business her way - that is the most remarkable thing about it. Another day, another thou.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2005
The Prince George's County school board is to meet tonight in closed session to discuss possible responses to a federal investigation of the county schools chief, which attracted renewed notice Tuesday when FBI agents seized documents from school system offices. County schools CEO Andre J. Hornsby has come under scrutiny for his dealings with several education vendors, including his approval in June of a $1 million purchase from a company, LeapFrog SchoolHouse, that employed a woman with whom he was living.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
GREENBELT -- Former Prince George's County school Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby cut an off-the-books deal with his girlfriend, who worked at an educational-supplies company, to enrich them both, a federal prosecutor told jurors yesterday in closing arguments of Hornsby's corruption trial. In arguments after four weeks of testimony, Assistant U.S. Attorney Stuart A. Berman walked jurors through a 16-count indictment against Hornsby that alleges he orchestrated an elaborate scheme to award high-value school contracts to his lover and a business associate in exchange for kickbacks, and that he ordered school district employees to destroy the evidence.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | December 12, 2006
An educational technology expert who had long worked for former Prince George's County schools chief Andre J. Hornsby accused the prominent educator of accepting kickbacks from contractors and then destroying the evidence years before he arrived in Maryland, according to court papers unsealed yesterday. In a meeting secretly recorded by the FBI, the unnamed witness, who worked with Hornsby in Texas, New York and finally in Maryland, provided federal agents the chance to tape a jittery Hornsby two years ago at Bowie hotel, court papers say. "Hornsby arrived in the hotel room and immediately began to discuss his belief that he was being followed," Baltimore FBI Special Agent John M. Sheridan wrote in the April 2005 search warrant application made public yesterday.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2008
After four years of investigations, two trials and a determined effort by federal prosecutors, former Prince George's County schools Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby was found guilty yesterday of six of the 22 counts of corruption with which he was charged. Hornsby, 54, was acquitted of two charges, and the jury deadlocked on the remaining 14. He was released pending sentencing on Oct. 20, when he could face a maximum of 90 years in prison. But Hornsby will most likely be sentenced to considerably less, perhaps a dozen years or more.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | July 16, 2008
GREENBELT - Jurors who are to decide the fate of former Prince George's County schools chief Andre J. Hornsby were virtually bombarded yesterday with facts, figures and entreaties by attorneys for the prosecution and the defense during closing arguments in the four-week-long corruption trial. Describing each of the 22 counts against Hornsby in federal court, Assistant U.S. Attorney Stuart A. Berman said that Hornsby "defrauded the school system of his honest services" when he tried to enrich himself through surreptitious deals with a longtime business partner and with a saleswoman for an educational materials company who was his live-in girlfriend.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | June 19, 2008
GREENBELT - The courtroom was filled with familiar faces. The judge, the two prosecutors, the defense attorney and the defendant - all had faced each other before. The only thing different was the jury. As the retrial of former Prince George's County schools chief Andre J. Hornsby got under way yesterday, Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Pauze made the same broad-stroke accusations that he had at Hornsby's previous trial, which ended in November with a deadlocked jury. But Pauze, in an encore he had not envisaged, appeared determined yesterday to establish a firmer, more credible case, to drive his points home with greater clarity, lest a similar fate befall Hornsby's new trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | April 10, 2008
Three-time Grammy winner Bruce Hornsby has produced an eclectic body of work and collaborated with a wide range of artists, including Don Henley, Stevie Nicks, Tupac Shakur and the Grateful Dead. Country and bluegrass musician Ricky Skaggs has 13 Grammys under his belt and debuted at the top of Billboard's bluegrass albums chart for the fourth time with his most recent album, Honoring the Fathers of Bluegrass: Tribute to 1946 and 1947. The two stars, who have collaborated in the past, team up again for a performance at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave., at 8 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2007
Undaunted by a deadlocked jury that could not reach a decision in the public corruption trial of the former Prince George's County schools chief, federal prosecutors in Maryland announced yesterday that they will retry Andre Hornsby, starting June 10. The first trial in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt ended Nov. 28 without a verdict after jurors remained divided in the kickback case. Prosecutors charged Hornsby more than a year ago with accepting kickbacks from an educational software saleswoman.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
Rail safety again at issue Baltimore officials are urging CSX to curtail rail traffic during events after a train carrying hazardous material derailed near M&T Bank Stadium. Hornsby case ends in mistrial The public corruption trial of Andre J. Hornsby ended with a jury deadlocked in the case against the former Prince George's County schools chief. State raids company with ties to mayor The offices of Doracon Contracting, one of Baltimore's largest developers, was raided by the Maryland state prosecutor's office in a probe into spending at City Hall.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2005
UPPER MARLBORO - The live-in girlfriend of the former Prince George's County schools chief, Andre J. Hornsby, received half of the commission on the school system's $1 million purchase of education software, according to an audit that raised other serious questions about Hornsby's activities. The audit released yesterday also found that, without the school board's permission, Hornsby was working as a consultant while holding the $250,000 county job, something he had previously denied. And it found that the school system had circumvented its own bidding rules in awarding a contract to a former colleague of Hornsby's who appeared to have been helping Hornsby run his own consulting business after the contract was awarded.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
When it comes to criminal trials, there's no telling what juries will do. They frequently have minds of their own, despite the evidence. That would appear to be the case in the mistrial of former Prince George's County school Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby as jurors deadlocked on a number of corruption charges against him. Federal prosecutors have rightly pledged to retry him. He has irrevocably broken the public's trust, whether or not he is found guilty...
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 30, 2007
It's not quite up there with the classic of the genre, the she-set-me-up tape that captured then-D.C. Mayor Marion Berry smoking crack in a hotel room. No, the gotcha tape of Andre J. Hornsby pocketing $1,000 from a government contractor in a room at the Bowie Comfort Inn isn't quite so dramatic. In fact, it's the casualness of the scene - the former Prince George's County schools superintendent actually says "whatever" when the contractor tries to confirm how much more she owes him for steering government business her way - that is the most remarkable thing about it. Another day, another thou.
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