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July 24, 2009
On July 22, 2009 Vera Mercidize Hornbeck Funeral from the Gregory J. Gonce Funeral Home, PA, 169 Riviera Drive, Pasadena on Saturday at 1 P.M. with Rev. Joanne Hunt officiating. Interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery. Family requests friends visit on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
T hey're look-alike brothers trying mightily to one-up each other in the same field. I refer not to the brothers Voltaggio, who emerged last week as Nos. 1 and 2 on "Top Chef," but to the brothers Hornbeck. Former Maryland schools Superintendent David Hornbeck has two sons, born 20 months apart, who nurse a sibling rivalry akin to what Frederick-born Bryan and Michael Voltaggio betrayed on national TV. Both Hornbeck boys are charter school principals in Baltimore.
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NEWS
October 10, 2003
On October 9, 2003, CHARLES beloved husband of Vera, devoted father of Charles W. Jr., dear father-in-law of Erna Hornbeck, loving son of Bernice and Jesse Hornbeck of Paw Paw, WV. Also survived by two grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. A proud member of U.S. Army and Veteran of WWII. Funeral from the family owned George J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 169 Riviera Drive on Saturday at 11:30 A.M. Interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery. Family request friends call on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
July 24, 2009
On July 22, 2009 Vera Mercidize Hornbeck Funeral from the Gregory J. Gonce Funeral Home, PA, 169 Riviera Drive, Pasadena on Saturday at 1 P.M. with Rev. Joanne Hunt officiating. Interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery. Family requests friends visit on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
For years, David W. Hornbeck has been angling for the toughest job in American education -- the superintendency of a large urban school system. Now he'll get his chance. If all goes well, the former Maryland state schools superintendent will be hired June 27 as head of Philadelphia's public schools.It's a job Mr. Hornbeck almost had in Baltimore three years ago, when Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke asked him to become a candidate, then abandoned him at the altar in favor of a nonsensical troika arrangement that has since fallen apart.
NEWS
By KALMAN R. HETTLEMAN | July 19, 1995
David Hornbeck's appointment one year ago as Philadelphia school superintendent received national coverage and acclaim. The former Maryland superintendent was a pre-eminent national education consultant described in the New York Times as ''Dr. Fix-it for ailing public schools.''Philadelphia would be a supreme test. Its school problems are the same as Baltimore's, only bigger -- 209,000 students (twice as many as Baltimore) who are 63 percent African-American, 10 percent Hispanic, with a 50 percent dropout rate and academic performance far below national norms.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
David W. Hornbeck, an educational reformer who served as Maryland's superintendent of schools from 1976 to 1988, will return to the state as the new president and chief executive officer of the International Youth Foundation, the Baltimore-based group's board of directors announced yesterday. Hornbeck, 61, also was superintendent of Philadelphia schools, a job he left in 2000 after six years. He later founded Good Schools Pennsylvania, a nonprofit initiative to improve public education in that state, and is chairman of the board of the nonprofit Children's Defense Fund.
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | June 27, 1991
The Citizens Planning and Housing Association of Baltimore has ranked former state school superintendent David W. Hornbeck as its top choice to head the city school system.CPHA, a non-profit group involved with community issues, ranked Lillian Gonzalez, an assistant superintendent in Washington, as its second choice. Representatives from CPHA and other school and community organizations interviewed the five candidates for the superintendent's post on Friday and Saturday.As part of the selection process, the school board asked the groups to submit their recommendations for the new superintendent by yesterday.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
It's 7:45 a.m. on a Monday at Baltimore-Washington International Airport -- muffin and bagel vendors have shifted into high gear -- and David Hornbeck is deep into notes for a high-level meeting that will take place in another airport -- New York's La Guardia -- before he flies to a third meeting in Cincinnati.David Karem, one of the Kentucky legislators who hired Mr.Hornbeck in 1989, says his pitch is most alluring because he talks about the future of children, rather than education."My first and foremost reason to work with David was that he was the only consultant we interviewed who talked about kids.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | May 30, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is so impressed with the school reform ideas of former state Superintendent David W. Hornbeck that he has asked a search committee to consider Hornbeck for the job of city school superintendent.Hornbeck, 49, was state superintendent from 1976 to 1988 and is now a consultant to local governments on school reform. His recent work includes a far-ranging reform plan crafted for the state of Kentucky."His position on the reform of the Kentucky schools -- particularly this notion of bringing together combined services from other agencies in the school building -- is really consistent with the way we've been moving here in this city," Schmoke said today.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2004
For David W. Hornbeck, it's not that far a cry from the tough urban schools of Baltimore and Philadelphia to those of Lima, Peru, where children grow up in poverty, and drugs and violence are commonplace. Hornbeck served 12 years as Maryland state schools chief and six as superintendent in rough-and-tumble Philadelphia. Now he's back in Baltimore at the nerve center of a worldwide network of organizations devoted to improving the lives of boys, girls and young adults. Hornbeck is the new president and chief operating officer of the International Youth Foundation, a 14-year-old philanthropic organization that awards money to youth programs - many of them politically sensitive - in 53 countries, yet has little visibility in its hometown.
NEWS
October 10, 2003
On October 9, 2003, CHARLES beloved husband of Vera, devoted father of Charles W. Jr., dear father-in-law of Erna Hornbeck, loving son of Bernice and Jesse Hornbeck of Paw Paw, WV. Also survived by two grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. A proud member of U.S. Army and Veteran of WWII. Funeral from the family owned George J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 169 Riviera Drive on Saturday at 11:30 A.M. Interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery. Family request friends call on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2003
If the pressure of the test is withdrawn, recent attention to writing instruction will diminish. That would assure that our youth would be unnecessarily the losers. -- Maryland schools Superintendent David W. Hornbeck, Jan. 20, 1986 THAT WAS Hornbeck 17 years ago, but he could have written it yesterday -- or a year ago this month when state officials announced the end of the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program. Writing was at the heart of MSPAP. Not only was there a separate writing test, but the questions in all of the disciplines, from math to social studies, were answered in writing.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
David W. Hornbeck, an educational reformer who served as Maryland's superintendent of schools from 1976 to 1988, will return to the state as the new president and chief executive officer of the International Youth Foundation, the Baltimore-based group's board of directors announced yesterday. Hornbeck, 61, also was superintendent of Philadelphia schools, a job he left in 2000 after six years. He later founded Good Schools Pennsylvania, a nonprofit initiative to improve public education in that state, and is chairman of the board of the nonprofit Children's Defense Fund.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
THE OTHER night, Darren Ray Hornbeck won the Oscar of Maryland public education. The sociology teacher at Linganore High School in Frederick County was named Teacher of the Year. He walked away from the gala at Martin's West with a $5,000 cash prize, $1,000 to attend a professional seminar of his choice, a laptop computer, a year's free use of a 2002 Lincoln LS, a trip to the White House and a chance to become National Teacher of the Year. It's all a bit daunting to Hornbeck, who had to be talked into entering the contest and who harbors a suspicion that there are lots of teachers as talented as he. "This is really a celebration of what my colleagues do, and it's a victory for my students," said Hornbeck, 38. "There are so many talented people here, and what can I say about the students?
NEWS
By KALMAN R. HETTLEMAN | July 19, 1995
David Hornbeck's appointment one year ago as Philadelphia school superintendent received national coverage and acclaim. The former Maryland superintendent was a pre-eminent national education consultant described in the New York Times as ''Dr. Fix-it for ailing public schools.''Philadelphia would be a supreme test. Its school problems are the same as Baltimore's, only bigger -- 209,000 students (twice as many as Baltimore) who are 63 percent African-American, 10 percent Hispanic, with a 50 percent dropout rate and academic performance far below national norms.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | June 14, 1991
By most measures, David W. Hornbeck is a success in an arena that dwarfs Baltimore and its problems.Mr. Hornbeck, a native of Knoxville, Tenn., who was Maryland's well-regarded state superintendent from 1976 to 1988, has built himself a national reputation as an education consultant. He serves on about a dozen national boards and panels, including one advising the nation's governors as they map out reforms to address the decline of America's schools.He helped draft Kentucky's education reforms -- adopted by the state legislature last year.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
For years, David W. Hornbeck has been angling for the toughest job in American education -- the superintendency of a large urban school system. Now he'll get his chance. If all goes well, the former Maryland state schools superintendent will be hired June 27 as head of Philadelphia's public schools.It's a job Mr. Hornbeck almost had in Baltimore three years ago, when Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke asked him to become a candidate, then abandoned him at the altar in favor of a nonsensical troika arrangement that has since fallen apart.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,Contributing Writer | May 26, 1992
Bruce H. Williams was 13 when his mother died. Bereaved by her death and beset with the usual problems of adolescence, he was a prime candidate for trouble. Thanks to his caring family, two male teachers who wanted to see him succeed, and ambitious college classmates, Mr. Williams, a Washington native, says he was able to "make the right choices."He went on to earn bachelor's and master's degrees from Howard University and, eventually, landed a place in corporate America. Currently, he is business unit executive of IBM's Maryland sales force that handles accounts with new and small businesses.
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