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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1991
AUSTIN, Minn. -- The Geo. A. Hormel & Co. threw itself one humdinger of a 100th birthday party Saturday, with a hot-air balloon, rock music and more cans of Spam, the company's most famous product, than seemed remotely digestible.It was a day to celebrate how George Hormel, a German immigrant, founded a meat-packing empire whose sales topped $2.6 billion last year. Along the way, the company claims to have invented Canadian bacon, marketed the first canned ham and sent 200 million pigs to hog heaven.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 26, 2003
U.S. turkey farmers are enduring the lowest prices in 11 years, extending the industry's slump for a third year. As Americans prepare for traditional turkey dinners tomorrow, producers are being squeezed as meat production rises faster than consumption. A truckload of 950 turkeys from farmer Dave Burkel Jr.'s six farms in Minnesota and North Dakota fetches $14,000, down 9 percent from $15,400 last year. "I don't think enough people have cut production," said Burkel, 41, who reduced his flock by 35 percent this year, to 1.5 million birds, and closed a farm in North Dakota.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's appointment of a gay philanthropist as ambassador to Luxembourg has given the conservatives in the Republican Party still another opportunity to demonstrate to the American people just how extreme they can be.Once again they are playing to their political base at the possible expense of support among more moderate Republicans and independents who support equal rights for homosexuals.The issue has been brought into focus by Sen. James M. Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican, who has announced that he will use one of those peculiar senatorial privileges to deny Senate confirmation to all civilian nominations by Mr. Clinton for the indefinite future.
NEWS
July 12, 2003
PITY POOR Hormel Foods. The Minnesota-based foodmaker is trying to stem the tide of common usage, valiantly trying to bulwark the integrity of its beloved Spam from the encroachment of an upstart e-mail software provider. Hormel has challenged the name trademark application of Seattle-based Spam Arrest, a tech firm that offers software to block small-S spam from clogging people's e-mailboxes. The argument is that the name Spam Arrest dilutes Hormel's trademarked name Spam (or SPAM, as Hormel puts it)
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Not long ago, if the name Hormel had resonance in international circles, it had to do with the exporting of Spam and other curious canned cuisine, not Luxembourg and the exporting of a homosexual agenda.But in recent months, James C. Hormel -- a 65-year-old food magnate, mild-mannered philanthropist and President Clinton's nominee to be ambassador to Luxembourg -- has become a lightning rod in the Senate. Hormel is openly gay.The San Francisco investor's confirmation has been blocked by conservatives ever since his nomination was approved by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee by a 16-2 vote in November.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
BIGOTRY among public officials is shocking. But that's the only way to explain why five Republican senators blocked the appointment of James C. Hormel as U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg for a year and a half.It wasn't that Mr. Hormel lacked qualifications. He's a former dean of the prestigious University of Chicago Law School. No, Mr. Hormel's "sin," in the eyes of Majority Leader Trent Lott and four other Republicans, was his sexual orientation: He's openly gay.That didn't bother the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which approved the Hormel nomination, 16-2.
NEWS
July 12, 2003
PITY POOR Hormel Foods. The Minnesota-based foodmaker is trying to stem the tide of common usage, valiantly trying to bulwark the integrity of its beloved Spam from the encroachment of an upstart e-mail software provider. Hormel has challenged the name trademark application of Seattle-based Spam Arrest, a tech firm that offers software to block small-S spam from clogging people's e-mailboxes. The argument is that the name Spam Arrest dilutes Hormel's trademarked name Spam (or SPAM, as Hormel puts it)
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | August 30, 2000
Item: Hormel Always Tender entrees What you get: Six 3-ounce servings Cost: About $6 Nutritional content: (Beef Roast Au Jus only) 120 calories; 6 grams fat; 3 grams saturated fat; 300 milligrams sodium Preparation time: 7 to 9 minutes in microwave, 12 to 14 minutes boiled in bag on stove top Review: There are days when even a heat-and-serve entree feels like work. After all, the cook has to dream up appealing side dishes. Hormel's Always Tender line comes to the rescue with recipes inside the package.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 1, 1995
Because he is openly gay, it appears that James Hormel, 62, a business executive, philanthropist and Democratic Party stalwart in San Francisco, will not be nominated by the Clinton administration as the next U.S. ambassador to Fiji.But just who is objecting to his homosexuality is harder to tell.The possibility was raised last fall that Mr. Hormel would be named to the post.In December, however, several newspapers reported that the White House was backing away from the nomination rather than face the probable opposition of Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
NEWS
By DERRICK Z. JACKSON | December 8, 1992
Boston. -- A few months ago, not long after I wrote about my many unexpected encounters with Spam in Hawaii, I received a box in the mail. It was a six-pack of Spam products from Hormel.There were two cans of original Spam, two cans of 25-percent-less-salt Spam and two cans of 25-percent-less-fat-and-salt Spam Lite. Of course, the fine print on the side of the 25-percent-less varieties said, ''Not Recommended For Sodium Restricted Diet.''An enclosed letter said, ''Please accept this gift of 'Hawaiian Soul Food' as a souvenir of your spring vacation to Hawaii.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | August 30, 2000
Item: Hormel Always Tender entrees What you get: Six 3-ounce servings Cost: About $6 Nutritional content: (Beef Roast Au Jus only) 120 calories; 6 grams fat; 3 grams saturated fat; 300 milligrams sodium Preparation time: 7 to 9 minutes in microwave, 12 to 14 minutes boiled in bag on stove top Review: There are days when even a heat-and-serve entree feels like work. After all, the cook has to dream up appealing side dishes. Hormel's Always Tender line comes to the rescue with recipes inside the package.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's appointment of a gay philanthropist as ambassador to Luxembourg has given the conservatives in the Republican Party still another opportunity to demonstrate to the American people just how extreme they can be.Once again they are playing to their political base at the possible expense of support among more moderate Republicans and independents who support equal rights for homosexuals.The issue has been brought into focus by Sen. James M. Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican, who has announced that he will use one of those peculiar senatorial privileges to deny Senate confirmation to all civilian nominations by Mr. Clinton for the indefinite future.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
BIGOTRY among public officials is shocking. But that's the only way to explain why five Republican senators blocked the appointment of James C. Hormel as U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg for a year and a half.It wasn't that Mr. Hormel lacked qualifications. He's a former dean of the prestigious University of Chicago Law School. No, Mr. Hormel's "sin," in the eyes of Majority Leader Trent Lott and four other Republicans, was his sexual orientation: He's openly gay.That didn't bother the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which approved the Hormel nomination, 16-2.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Not long ago, if the name Hormel had resonance in international circles, it had to do with the exporting of Spam and other curious canned cuisine, not Luxembourg and the exporting of a homosexual agenda.But in recent months, James C. Hormel -- a 65-year-old food magnate, mild-mannered philanthropist and President Clinton's nominee to be ambassador to Luxembourg -- has become a lightning rod in the Senate. Hormel is openly gay.The San Francisco investor's confirmation has been blocked by conservatives ever since his nomination was approved by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee by a 16-2 vote in November.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 1, 1995
Because he is openly gay, it appears that James Hormel, 62, a business executive, philanthropist and Democratic Party stalwart in San Francisco, will not be nominated by the Clinton administration as the next U.S. ambassador to Fiji.But just who is objecting to his homosexuality is harder to tell.The possibility was raised last fall that Mr. Hormel would be named to the post.In December, however, several newspapers reported that the White House was backing away from the nomination rather than face the probable opposition of Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
NEWS
By DERRICK Z. JACKSON | December 8, 1992
Boston. -- A few months ago, not long after I wrote about my many unexpected encounters with Spam in Hawaii, I received a box in the mail. It was a six-pack of Spam products from Hormel.There were two cans of original Spam, two cans of 25-percent-less-salt Spam and two cans of 25-percent-less-fat-and-salt Spam Lite. Of course, the fine print on the side of the 25-percent-less varieties said, ''Not Recommended For Sodium Restricted Diet.''An enclosed letter said, ''Please accept this gift of 'Hawaiian Soul Food' as a souvenir of your spring vacation to Hawaii.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 26, 2003
U.S. turkey farmers are enduring the lowest prices in 11 years, extending the industry's slump for a third year. As Americans prepare for traditional turkey dinners tomorrow, producers are being squeezed as meat production rises faster than consumption. A truckload of 950 turkeys from farmer Dave Burkel Jr.'s six farms in Minnesota and North Dakota fetches $14,000, down 9 percent from $15,400 last year. "I don't think enough people have cut production," said Burkel, 41, who reduced his flock by 35 percent this year, to 1.5 million birds, and closed a farm in North Dakota.
NEWS
By Douglas Martin and Douglas Martin,New York Times News Service | May 20, 1991
AUSTIN, Minn. -- The Geo. A. Hormel & Co. threw itself one humdinger of a 100th birthday party Saturday, with a hot-air balloon, rock music and more cans of Spam, the company's most famous product, than seemed remotely digestible.It was a day to celebrate how George Hormel, a German immigrant, chanced upon southern Minnesota's "cool blue skies" and stayed to found a meat-packing empire whose sales topped $2.6 billion last year. Along the way, the company claims to have invented Canadian bacon, marketed the first canned ham and sent 200 million pigs to hog heaven.
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