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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring.  Until last week, the most exciting thing you'll see in a Baltimore crosswalk is an occasional Toynbee tile. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Tower in the city's newest Arts and Entertainment district.  Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen painted a hopscotch court in a crosswalk at Eutaw and Lombard Streets that was unveiled today.
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NEWS
December 4, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower in the city's newest arts and entertainment district. Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen designed four hopscotch courts in crosswalks at Eutaw and Lombard streets that were unveiled last week. Coreil-Allen, who creates art in public places, also created an installation in Waverly called Tinges Commons and, earlier this fall, led tours of "invisible sites and overlooked architectural and psychic features" in Station North.
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NEWS
July 22, 2007
Hopscotch tiles through a vegetable garden are one clue that Bethany Ziman's garden isn't just for grown-ups, but for kids, too. Tomorrow, see how she combines food, flowers and fun in her backyard by going to baltimoresun.com/gardener.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring.  Until last week, the most exciting thing you'll see in a Baltimore crosswalk is an occasional Toynbee tile. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Tower in the city's newest Arts and Entertainment district.  Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen painted a hopscotch court in a crosswalk at Eutaw and Lombard Streets that was unveiled today.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Chicago Tribune | September 22, 2006
All the jumpy, hopscotch-style editing in the world can't save Haven, a blow- and weed-scented drama written and directed by young Cayman Islands native Frank E. Flowers. It's one of those fragmented narratives, the curse of the success of Pulp Fiction and Crash, wherein we see in passing somebody throwing up on a lawn, and then a half-hour later in flashback it's revealed who the puker is and why he's upchucking. I don't know about you, but when I see someone hurling I want immediate identification.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | June 25, 1998
Labanotation is a kind of shorthand for recording movement -- any kind, from dance to athletics to hopscotch -- in abstract terms.Invented in 1928 by Rudolf von Laban, a German choreographer and movement theorist, it has become the most widely used method of preserving choreography in the world. And now that some genius has invented a Labanotation program for computers, it is much easier to use than the old laborious drawn-by-hand technique.The University of Maryland, College Park will offer a training program in Labanotation starting in September.
FEATURES
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
It is a damp, bleak morning. Deep in the bowels of her Columbia town house, Ruth Glick sits drumming her fingernails in the shadowy light.Tap. Tap. Tap.She and co-author Eileen Buckholtz quietly plot their next Harlequin novel. Their heroine, Jessica Adams, is trying to make a vampire movie. Unfortunately, cast members keep showing up dead with neck bites.But the vampire angle isn't quite enough. The novel needs more danger.It needs . . . birds.It's Mrs. Buckholtz's idea. A flock could attack Jessica while she scouts out an old house for filming.
NEWS
By Michele Rosenberg | July 5, 2000
THE BULLDOZER has knocked down the unique Spanish architecture that housed many of the neighborhood businesses in Forest Park. For a few days, the block looked liked a bombed version of London during the World War II blitz. Amid the rubble, a proud indestructible safe was left standing alone; the last remnant of the long vanished Union Trust was still holding out. Today, Forest Park could be as viable as it was 50 years ago. Instead, progress has caused its demise. The drug wars have arrived.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | August 12, 2007
When it comes to back-to-school shopping, why should the kids get all the goodies? What about the mothers who have to keep track of the soccer games, bake sales, music lessons and doctor appointments? So here are a few items to celebrate the cool and organized mom. Leopard-print organizing tote Price: $20 Where to get it: Aaron Brothers Art and Framing, 55 W. Aylesbury Road, Suite A, in Timonium and 9097 Snowden River Parkway, Suite A, in Columbia. Why we like it: A stylish way to organize all the many mom papers that come your way. Mom Family Desk Planner and Mom's Family Calendar Price: $13 each Where to get them: At bookstores, online book retailers and mass merchandise stores Why we like it: The cute Sandra Boynton drawings add a touch of humor to these practical organizers that come with stickers, phone lists and plenty of space to write down the family's activities.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
The Harford County Council's public hearing on a bill to abolish a 20-year-old law that allows farmers to transfer development rights to adjoining properties drew an emotional crowd of about 80 people last night, sparking a decision to postpone any amendment motions until April 15. More than a dozen people spoke on the bill. Many laid the fault on a lack of designated development areas. Farmer Ed Snodgrass of Street echoed the opinions of many when he said he believes the county has a transfer development rights law, but no program to guide or regulate the transfers.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | August 12, 2007
When it comes to back-to-school shopping, why should the kids get all the goodies? What about the mothers who have to keep track of the soccer games, bake sales, music lessons and doctor appointments? So here are a few items to celebrate the cool and organized mom. Leopard-print organizing tote Price: $20 Where to get it: Aaron Brothers Art and Framing, 55 W. Aylesbury Road, Suite A, in Timonium and 9097 Snowden River Parkway, Suite A, in Columbia. Why we like it: A stylish way to organize all the many mom papers that come your way. Mom Family Desk Planner and Mom's Family Calendar Price: $13 each Where to get them: At bookstores, online book retailers and mass merchandise stores Why we like it: The cute Sandra Boynton drawings add a touch of humor to these practical organizers that come with stickers, phone lists and plenty of space to write down the family's activities.
NEWS
July 22, 2007
Hopscotch tiles through a vegetable garden are one clue that Bethany Ziman's garden isn't just for grown-ups, but for kids, too. Tomorrow, see how she combines food, flowers and fun in her backyard by going to baltimoresun.com/gardener.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Chicago Tribune | September 22, 2006
All the jumpy, hopscotch-style editing in the world can't save Haven, a blow- and weed-scented drama written and directed by young Cayman Islands native Frank E. Flowers. It's one of those fragmented narratives, the curse of the success of Pulp Fiction and Crash, wherein we see in passing somebody throwing up on a lawn, and then a half-hour later in flashback it's revealed who the puker is and why he's upchucking. I don't know about you, but when I see someone hurling I want immediate identification.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 18, 2006
If you're traveling about the country during the next few weeks, don't be surprised if you bump into a major player from Baltimore's cultural stage: Marin Alsop, music director-to-be of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. She's conducting from coast-to-coast, starting tonight, when she leads the New York Philharmonic in a free concert on the Great Lawn of Central Park. Despite the heat wave, this may turn out to be one of the cooler spots in Manhattan. Alsop has programmed a fun piece by John Adams, The Chairman Dances, derived from his opera Nixon in China, and Beethoven's evergreen Symphony No. 5. In between will be Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 1, with Leila Josefowicz, a fast-rising young talent on today's scene, as soloist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 21, 2004
There are at least two Nicolas Cage personae. One is the wildly eccentric, Oscar-winning character of Leaving Las Vegas, as well as similar loose cannons in Adaptation, Raising Arizona and Wild at Heart. The other is the action hero of The Rock, Con Air and Gone in 60 Seconds. National Treasure, which opened Friday, combines both of them. Cage plays an eccentric, scholarly treasure hunter who seeks riches possibly buried by our Founding Fathers, who wanted to prevent the booty from falling into British hands.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
The Harford County Council's public hearing on a bill to abolish a 20-year-old law that allows farmers to transfer development rights to adjoining properties drew an emotional crowd of about 80 people last night, sparking a decision to postpone any amendment motions until April 15. More than a dozen people spoke on the bill. Many laid the fault on a lack of designated development areas. Farmer Ed Snodgrass of Street echoed the opinions of many when he said he believes the county has a transfer development rights law, but no program to guide or regulate the transfers.
NEWS
By Michael Skube | April 17, 1998
SINCE Cleveland Avenue Elementary School near Atlanta, Ga. opened two years ago, students have sat in ergonomically correct desks, eaten in a modern new cafeteria, even pecked away at computers. Cleveland is a school with its eye on the future.It's hard to imagine those students having fond memories of the place 30 years from now.This isn't the little red schoolhouse. It's a school that might have been designed by efficiency experts, one whose main purpose seems to be productivity. There are no monkey bars, no swings, no ball field.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
Magic may or may not be in the air at this year's Baltimore Symphony Decorators' Show House -- but there's no doubt it's on the walls and on the floors and on the ceilings and on the woodwork and on the cornices and on the kitchen cabinets and on the basement stair walls.It's the magic of paint, and it's everywhere in the 106-year-old Lamb house -- once the summer home of George and Annie Lamb, well-to-do Quakers. We're not talking here about the merely faux -- the simple marbling of a cornice-style molding, though the house has that, too -- but about true trompe l'oeil, the witty and imaginative use of paint to decorate, disguise and duplicate other surfaces.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2002
With her school locked down by the sniper shootings, one Prince George's County principal organized a diversion for her increasingly restless pupils: Popsicles and hopscotch. The 712 children at Barnaby Manor Elementary School, near the District of Columbia line, needed more relief than inside recess, so Principal Laura Barbee scheduled afternoon parties this week. The "Shutdown Socials," as Barbee calls the 20 minutes of playfulness, are among a host of activities that principals across the region have instituted as the school lockdowns enter their third week.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 10, 2002
IN A THROWAWAY society, the beautiful things sometimes get the chance to stick around. It happens now at 4801 Liberty Heights Ave., in Northwest Baltimore, where once there was a place called Howard Park Elementary School No. 218; now it is The Oaks at Liberty. They are the same place at opposite ends of the life cycle. In its youth, the building was home to schoolkids in the morning of their lives. Now the elderly will live there in their twilight, in 75 cozy apartments officially opened last week with the mayor of Baltimore on hand, and housing officials, and a city councilwoman, Helen Holton, who understood better than anyone the sweetness of the moment.
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