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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2002
Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died yesterday afternoon at his Bolton Hill home, where he had lived for nearly 60 years. He was 100. "He just took a nap and fell asleep," said his daughter Pattie Turner Walker of Ipswich, Mass. The medical school's dean from 1957 to 1968, he also studied infectious diseases, including polio. During World War II, he played a leading role in the Army's program to eradicate syphilis. During his stewardship, the size of the medical school's physical plant doubled, the annual operating budget increased 500 percent, the faculty nearly doubled, and biophysics, laboratory animal medicine and biomedical engineering departments were added.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
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NEWS
September 25, 2002
Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner: Services for Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Memorial Episcopal Church, Bolton Street and Lafayette Avenue, where he was a member. Dr. Turner died Sunday at his Bolton Hill home at age 100.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Dr. Frederick L. Brancati, an internationally known expert on the epidemiology and prevention of type 2 diabetes who was director of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Tuesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at his Lutherville home. He was 53. "He was a delightful human being — smart, witty and fun to be around," said Dr. Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, whom Dr. Brancati succeeded as division chief.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
FEATURES
September 5, 1993
Jennifer Marie Loughran of Kingsville, an honors graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, has been admitted into the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing.*Five recent graduates of the Johns Hopkins School of Engineering have been awarded biomedical engineering fellowships by the Whitaker Foundation. They are David Chand, Andrew Grumet, Jeffrey Holmes, Darren Miller and Tara Riemer.*Woody Vondracek, formerly of Essex, was on the team of journalists at the Miami Herald awarded the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of Hurricane Andrew.
NEWS
April 18, 2002
Barbara Yarbrough, a senior lab technician at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died of cancer Monday at Sinai Hospital. She was 64 and lived in the Cheswolde section of Northwest Baltimore. She worked at the medical school for 31 years and was senior technician in the clinical pathology lab. She also co-wrote several scientific studies relating to animal models of human disease, including cancer. Born and raised in Opelika, Ala., she attended Alabama College. Miss Yarbrough taught high school for a year in West Point, Ga., and spent six years in the Women's Army Corps, attaining the rank of sergeant.
NEWS
December 19, 2000
Lt. Col. George E. Peoples, M.D., a resident of Fulton, has been selected as one of Ten Outstanding Young Americans for 2001 by the U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce. The award is presented annually to Americans with exceptional achievements and who have demonstrated service to humanity. Peoples, 38, a surgical oncologist at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, has discovered and developed vaccines that have proven applicable to a wide variety of cancers, according to the medical center.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
On March 6, 2006, MARY ALICE SHIPLEY (nee Patterson) beloved wife of thelate Howell C. Shipley, devoted mother of Edward Lee Shipley, cherished grandmother of Edward Lee Jr., Skip, Kevin and Tamerlayne Shipley, loving great-grandmother of Erin, Erica and Dustin Shipley. Also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at St. James Episcopal Church in Monkton on Saturday, March 11 at 3 P.M. Interment to follow in adjoining cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, 21205.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2002
Dr. Alan Churchill Woods Jr. - a retired Baltimore surgeon, former professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a colorful raconteur - died of complications from a stroke Monday at ManorCare Ruxton. He was 84 and lived in the Lakehurst section of North Baltimore. Dr. Woods, who had lived on Wendover Road in Guilford for many years before moving to Lakehurst in 2000, was raised in Guilford. He was a third-generation member of a prominent medical family. His father, Dr. Alan C. Woods Sr., had been chairman of the medical board of Hopkins Hospital and director of the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Fans were missing linebacker Ray Lewis at the end of the Ravens' last game. Lewis is out for the season after suffering a triceps tear, a rare injury with a long recovery time. Dr. Umasuthan Srikumaran, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said triceps tears are significant injuries for athletes. What is a triceps tear and how common is this injury? The triceps is the muscle on the back part of your arm. It originates from the shoulder blade and the upper portion of the arm, crosses the elbow joint, and inserts into the ulna, a bone in your forearm.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 13, 2011
Dr. John Howard "Jack" Yardley, former director of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who had also been associate dean for academic affairs, died Dec. 7 of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Roland Park resident was 85. "For more than 50 years, John devoted his energies to research, patient care and teaching," Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean of the medical faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, wrote in an email to his medical school colleagues.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 26, 2011
Dr. Peter J. Golueke, a noted Baltimore vascular surgeon and a founder of Vascular Surgery Associates LLC, died Monday of a brain tumor at his Guilford home. He was 55. The son of an Amoco Oil Co. manager and a homemaker, Dr. Golueke was born in Green Bay, Wis., and two years later moved with his family to Milwaukee. In 1962, they moved to Towson. After graduating in 1973 from Towson Catholic High School, he attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he studied chemical engineering for three years.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
Having trouble concentrating? Can't sit still? Are you disorganized and always late? If so, and if you've always been that way, it might not be a flaw in your personality but a genuine clinical disorder known as adult ADHD. Everyone's heard of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, but left undiagnosed and untreated, it can carry over into adulthood, says Dr. David W. Goodman, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Center of Maryland in Lutherville.
NEWS
By Helby Selby | November 17, 2008
As people live longer and suffer from more chronic diseases, the risk of inappropriately using drugs or overmedicating increases among the elderly, says Susan Zieman, geriatric cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Most elderly people are on multiple medications and frequently metabolize drugs differently from younger people, she says. The drugs may build up in their systems and interact with other drugs in unexpected ways.
NEWS
April 13, 2007
Dr. Wayne Eugene Jacobson, a retired Towson psychiatrist and avid fly fisherman, died of a heart attack Saturday at his Glen Arm home. He was 84. Dr. Jacobson was born and raised in Rock Springs, Wyo., and entered the University of Wyoming in 1941. He enlisted in the Navy in 1942 and served as a corpsman aboard the USS Mount Vernon, a troop ship assigned to the Pacific theater. While awaiting reassignment, he took advantage of the Navy's V-12 program, earned a bachelor's degree in pre-medicine in 1945 from Willamette University in Oregon.
NEWS
May 19, 2006
Grants The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded a four-year, $1.5 million grant to Lai-Xi Wang, an associate professor of chemistry at the Institute of Human Virology in Baltimore. The grant will be used to study how carbohydrates in the HIV virus can stimulate the body's immune system. Wang's research will contribute to the institute's quest to develop an HIV vaccine. IHV is a center of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and affiliated with the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
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