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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1998
Willis G. Regier, director of the Johns Hopkins University Press for the past three years, has resigned from the 120-year-old academic publishing house because of an internal dispute.Steve McClain, vice provost for academic planning and budget, said he accepted Regier's resignation two weeks ago after discussing "some problems."McClain would not elaborate, other than to say they related to "incompatibility between the senior staff and Bill."He praised Regier as "a very fine individual and intellect" who brought innovative programs to the press.
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NEWS
January 6, 2008
Exploring Maryland: It may be cold outside, but Maryland in winter has its own unique appeal. There is an impressive array of guidebooks available offering a rich diversity of trails for you to explore. Among them: 60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Baltimore: Including Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford and Howard Counties / by Evan Balkan / Menasha Ridge Press/ 304 pages / $16 From hikes within the city, including a new 14-mile greenway running through the largest unbroken urban forest in the United States, to the solitude of rural Carroll and northwest Baltimore counties, this new book offers some great hikes in the area.
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FEATURES
By Boston Globe | March 17, 1992
The most upbeat message of recent books on health and medicine is contained in "Heart Illness and Intimacy: How Caring Relationships Aid Recovery," by Wayne M. Sotile (Johns Hopkins University Press, hardcover $19.95).For most heart patients, according to Sotile, a psychologist at Wake Forest University Cardiac Rehabilitation Services, sex is no more dangerous than gardening. He also maintains that fear, anger and guilt can be turned into positive emotions and that coping with heart illness can bring families closer together.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
In conjunction with the opening of the World Lacrosse Championship this Thursday in London, Ontario, the Canadian postal service has issued a 51-cent stamp that honors the sport that was declared the nation's official summer sport by Parliament in 1994. The inspiration for the action-filled stamp, designed by Tom Yakobina and illustrated by Yvan Meunier, is based on a photograph not of a Canadian lacrosse game but one between the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
SOMETIMES, the more you try to keep something quiet, the louder it gets. That's a lesson learned the hard way by administrators at the Bryn Mawr School in the wake of news stories detailing the school's refusal to allow a historian's dissertation to be published. It all started when Andrea Hamilton, a graduate student at Tulane University, decided to write her dissertation on the history of the well-respected private girls' school in north Baltimore and got permission to mine Bryn Mawr's archives for material.
NEWS
By ELISABETH STEVENS | October 5, 1997
Because I am a writer who's been published by small presses, I tend to read books by university and small presses. Those publishers are giving something - some great literary works - we can't get elsewhere.I'm re-reading Josephine Jacobsen's "Collected Works," which is published by Johns Hopkins University Press. ... There's one story I particularly like, "Nel bagno." It's about a women who's going on a trip but gets stuck in a bathroom before she departs. There's this moment when she realizes that everyone will think she's already left, so no one will rescue her. It's an intense story; it really shows Jacobsen's talent.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Exploring Maryland: It may be cold outside, but Maryland in winter has its own unique appeal. There is an impressive array of guidebooks available offering a rich diversity of trails for you to explore. Among them: 60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Baltimore: Including Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford and Howard Counties / by Evan Balkan / Menasha Ridge Press/ 304 pages / $16 From hikes within the city, including a new 14-mile greenway running through the largest unbroken urban forest in the United States, to the solitude of rural Carroll and northwest Baltimore counties, this new book offers some great hikes in the area.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | June 11, 1995
Guidebooks for Baltimore have been on sale since well before the Civil War. And the prime need of today's tourist may be simply a parking space. Occasionally, though, visitors want a proper fill-in. Tell them, somebody, about the newest and best of vade mecums, "Walking in Baltimore: An Intimate Guide to the Old City," by Frank R. Shivers Jr. (Johns Hopkins University Press. 316 pages. $35.95; paperbound, $16.95).Mr. Shivers lays out a dozen tours, stretching from Patterson Park to Federal Hill to Bolton Hill (where he lives - he wrote an earlier book about it)
NEWS
August 17, 1991
Gordon K. Lewis, 72, a native of Wales who became a leading expert on Caribbean politics, died yesterday in Puerto Rico after a long illness. He first went there to help write the island's constitution, which was adopted in 1952. He earned his doctorate in 1954 at Harvard University and returned to live in Puerto Rico. He joined the political science department at the University of Puerto Rico in the early 1950s and served from 1983 to 1987 as director of the university's Institute of Caribbean Studies.
FEATURES
By James H. Bready | October 30, 1994
Jack Goellner's retirement next March 31 from the top post at Johns Hopkins University Press will send a ripple across U.S. scholarly publishing. It comes just as university presses, with their attached learned journals, are maneuvering to go on-line, .. nationally and internationally. And expensively. As new relationships form between electronic publishers and university subscribers, there will be some shaking up.Whoever's next as director at Johns Hopkins University Press will sit down in the seat of catbirds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | July 17, 2005
How quiet, up here in the bell-tower room in Gilman Hall. Far below, maybe a few sunbathers on the grassy Beach, or bowl, of Johns Hopkins' Homewood campus. Across Charles Street, high in Wolman Hall (once the Cambridge Arms), see those four apartment windows? There, in 1935-1936, F. Scott Fitzgerald lived and wrote. Gilman's tower-room view of downtown is good too, but those who peer out raptly, in other seasons, or who slump around the big table, in three-hour critiques, are writers themselves -- grad students in the university's Writing Seminars.
NEWS
May 20, 2002
JHU still wants to publish book on Bryn Mawr The Sun's article "Historians sign on to petition Bryn Mawr on quashed book" (May 13) incorrectly states that the Johns Hopkins University Press canceled without explanation historian Andrea Hamilton's contract for a book on the Bryn Mawr School. In fact, when the contract was canceled, it was at Ms. Hamilton's request, so she could seek another publisher. And, we did fully explain to Ms. Hamilton why we concluded that Bryn Mawr's legal position prevented us from publishing her book.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
SOMETIMES, the more you try to keep something quiet, the louder it gets. That's a lesson learned the hard way by administrators at the Bryn Mawr School in the wake of news stories detailing the school's refusal to allow a historian's dissertation to be published. It all started when Andrea Hamilton, a graduate student at Tulane University, decided to write her dissertation on the history of the well-respected private girls' school in north Baltimore and got permission to mine Bryn Mawr's archives for material.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2000
As dawn's light raced from chilly Atlantic beaches to the rugged mountains of Western Maryland this morning, it warmed a state that was waking up to its birthday. Today is Maryland Day, and if a cake were baked to celebrate the state's natal day, it would have to be large enough to accommodate 366 candles. Maryland Day commemorates the landing of a hearty band of settlers "near twenty gentlemen of very good fashion and three hundred laboring men," who were led by Cecil Calvert, the second Lord Baltimore, to what is today St. Mary's County.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
Who cares if summer's official start isn't until sometime in June? Everyone knows that it always begins with Memorial Day weekend and ends on Labor Day.And by the time the three-day weekend concludes Monday evening, some 300,000 carloads of ocean-bound holiday revelers will have traveled over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, renewing an annual ritual not unlike that of spawning salmon who return each year to the rivers and streams of their birth.And maybe some of those visitors to Ocean City, Bethany and Rehoboth will steal a quick minute this weekend to hastily scrawl the cliche postcard message that has survived the ages to family members, friends or lovers left behind at home: "Wish you were here.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1998
Willis G. Regier, director of the Johns Hopkins University Press for the past three years, has resigned from the 120-year-old academic publishing house because of an internal dispute.Steve McClain, vice provost for academic planning and budget, said he accepted Regier's resignation two weeks ago after discussing "some problems."McClain would not elaborate, other than to say they related to "incompatibility between the senior staff and Bill."He praised Regier as "a very fine individual and intellect" who brought innovative programs to the press.
NEWS
May 20, 2002
JHU still wants to publish book on Bryn Mawr The Sun's article "Historians sign on to petition Bryn Mawr on quashed book" (May 13) incorrectly states that the Johns Hopkins University Press canceled without explanation historian Andrea Hamilton's contract for a book on the Bryn Mawr School. In fact, when the contract was canceled, it was at Ms. Hamilton's request, so she could seek another publisher. And, we did fully explain to Ms. Hamilton why we concluded that Bryn Mawr's legal position prevented us from publishing her book.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
Who cares if summer's official start isn't until sometime in June? Everyone knows that it always begins with Memorial Day weekend and ends on Labor Day.And by the time the three-day weekend concludes Monday evening, some 300,000 carloads of ocean-bound holiday revelers will have traveled over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, renewing an annual ritual not unlike that of spawning salmon who return each year to the rivers and streams of their birth.And maybe some of those visitors to Ocean City, Bethany and Rehoboth will steal a quick minute this weekend to hastily scrawl the cliche postcard message that has survived the ages to family members, friends or lovers left behind at home: "Wish you were here.
NEWS
By ELISABETH STEVENS | October 5, 1997
Because I am a writer who's been published by small presses, I tend to read books by university and small presses. Those publishers are giving something - some great literary works - we can't get elsewhere.I'm re-reading Josephine Jacobsen's "Collected Works," which is published by Johns Hopkins University Press. ... There's one story I particularly like, "Nel bagno." It's about a women who's going on a trip but gets stuck in a bathroom before she departs. There's this moment when she realizes that everyone will think she's already left, so no one will rescue her. It's an intense story; it really shows Jacobsen's talent.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
Relocation: Rusk's radical proposal to save the city and suburbsIs ethnic cleansing the answer to dying cities' problems? If we "relocate" poor blacks, would that help the city get well and keep its suburbs from getting sick?David Rusk says so in "Baltimore Unbound: Creating a Greater Baltimore Region for the Twenty-first Century." (The Abell Foundation, distributed by The Johns Hopkins University Press. 159 Pages. $14.95 paperback).And when David Rusk speaks, people listen. He is the hottest urban expert in the nation today.
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