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Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

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By Luther Young | December 1, 1990
Launch: Tomorrow morning between 1:28 and 3:58 at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla.Orbiter: Columbia.Payload: $150 million observatory with four telescopes: Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope, Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, Broad Band X-Ray Telescope and Wisconsin Photopolarimeter Experiment.Crew: Commander Vance D. Brand; Air Force Col. Guy S. Gardner, pilot; mission specialists Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Robert A. R. Parker; and payload specialists Samuel T. Durrance and Ronald A. Parise.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2001
Arthur F. Davidsen, a Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist whose discoveries were fundamental to understanding the structure of the universe and whose efforts brought the Space Telescope Science Institute to the Homewood campus, died Thursday of complications from a lung disorder at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 57. At the time of his death, he was a professor of physics and astronomy at Hopkins. In 1997, he was interim dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.
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NEWS
By Luther Young and Luther Young,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 4, 1990
GREENBELT -- The Astro-1 observatory -- finally launched Sunday after years of delays -- lost a day of precious observing time before astronauts grabbed the reins from a malfunctioning automatic pointing system and began manually directing the telescopes at celestial targets."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1995
Space shuttle Endeavour's record-long stargazing flight was extended to at least 16 1/2 days because of stormy weather at the landing site yesterday.The delay, after more than two weeks of round-the-clock work with a $200 million set of ultraviolet telescopes, left the crew a full day to rest and look out the window.The telescopes had already been packed away for the ride home Thursday night, just after scientists on the ground had a little fun with the crew.As they were preparing to shut down their equipment, Endeavour astronauts saw something strange on the TV monitor that displays what the telescopes are seeing.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 30, 1990
Johns Hopkins University astronomers and Baltimore astronaut Sam Durrance were trying to keep their emotions bolted down today as NASA continued its countdown for Sunday's planned launch of the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope aboard the shuttle Columbia."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
It was a sort of homecoming for Johns Hopkins University astronomer Arthur F. Davidsen. Only in this case, "home" was TC billion light years away.At 6:40 p.m. yesterday, after suffering through more technical difficulties, astronauts aboard the space shuttle Columbia turned the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) toward a brilliant object in the constellation Virgo known only as 3C273.The object, the brightest quasar in the sky, is more than a billion light years beyond the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy.
NEWS
December 31, 1990
Some might view 1990 as the Year of the Bad Guys. Manuel Noriega, a U.S. client ruling Panama in an unruly way, dominated last January's news after a frustrated George Bush sent the cavalry to arrest him for drug-dealing and betraying the faith. At midyear, the Good Guys had their day: Nelson Mandela was freed, Germany fully reunited and Eastern Europe confronted the perils of democracy. Mikhail Gorbachev, who started it all, won the Nobel Prize but couldn't stop Soviet society's tumble toward chaos at year's end.Iraq's Saddam Hussein threw desert sand into Western eyes.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | October 25, 1993
Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Samuel T. Durrance is poised for a second journey to the stars to seek new light on the mysteries of the universe.Dr. Durrance, who expected his first ride in 1990 on the space shuttle Columbia to be a once-in-a-lifetime experience, was selected to join the reflight of the Astro observatory, perhaps as early as November 1994.NASA also chose Ronald A. Parise, a senior scientist at Computer Sciences Corp. in Silver Spring, to man the second astronomy mission.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1995
Space shuttle Endeavour's record-long stargazing flight was extended to at least 16 1/2 days because of stormy weather at the landing site yesterday.The delay, after more than two weeks of round-the-clock work with a $200 million set of ultraviolet telescopes, left the crew a full day to rest and look out the window.The telescopes had already been packed away for the ride home Thursday night, just after scientists on the ground had a little fun with the crew.As they were preparing to shut down their equipment, Endeavour astronauts saw something strange on the TV monitor that displays what the telescopes are seeing.
NEWS
By Luther Young | May 21, 1991
The Astro observatory of ultraviolet telescopes has been spared the budget ax and will fly again aboard a space shuttle in 1993, reversing an earlier NASA decision to end the project after its successful first mission last December.Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D.-Md., and NASA's chief scientist, Lennard Fisk, made the announcement yesterday at the Johns Hopkins University, home of one of the Astro instruments and astrophysicist Samuel T. Durrance, a payload specialist on the nine-day December mission.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | October 25, 1993
Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Samuel T. Durrance is poised for a second journey to the stars to seek new light on the mysteries of the universe.Dr. Durrance, who expected his first ride in 1990 on the space shuttle Columbia to be a once-in-a-lifetime experience, was selected to join the reflight of the Astro observatory, perhaps as early as November 1994.NASA also chose Ronald A. Parise, a senior scientist at Computer Sciences Corp. in Silver Spring, to man the second astronomy mission.
NEWS
By Luther Young | May 21, 1991
The Astro observatory of ultraviolet telescopes has been spared the budget ax and will fly again aboard a space shuttle in 1993, reversing an earlier NASA decision to end the project after its successful first mission last December.Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D.-Md., and NASA's chief scientist, Lennard Fisk, made the announcement yesterday at the Johns Hopkins University, home of one of the Astro instruments and astrophysicist Samuel T. Durrance, a payload specialist on the nine-day December mission.
NEWS
By Luther Young Patricia Meisol of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | April 3, 1991
Johns Hopkins University announced yesterday that it is withdrawing from a project to build a major new telescope in Chile, a move described by a faculty researcher as a "setback" to ambitious growth plans for astronomy at Hopkins.The university, citing an inability to raise $15 million, will officially end its participation in the Magellan Telescope project on June 30, five years after joining a consortium to build and operate the huge 315-inch telescope at Las Campanas, Chile."It was understood . . . that Hopkins' participation was contingent upon having donors step forward to cover our share of the enormous costs of construction," said Lloyd Armstrong Jr., dean of the School of Arts and Sciences.
NEWS
December 31, 1990
Some might view 1990 as the Year of the Bad Guys. Manuel Noriega, a U.S. client ruling Panama in an unruly way, dominated last January's news after a frustrated George Bush sent the cavalry to arrest him for drug-dealing and betraying the faith. At midyear, the Good Guys had their day: Nelson Mandela was freed, Germany fully reunited and Eastern Europe confronted the perils of democracy. Mikhail Gorbachev, who started it all, won the Nobel Prize but couldn't stop Soviet society's tumble toward chaos at year's end.Iraq's Saddam Hussein threw desert sand into Western eyes.
NEWS
By Luther Young | December 11, 1990
The space shuttle Columbia returned to Earth early this morning, carrying a battle-tested crew that overcame telescope-pointing problems and a threatening backup of wastewater to squeeze a surprising amount of science from a mission that at times seemed jinxed.Originally scheduled for 10 days, the Astro-1 mission -- to study invisible ultraviolet and X-ray radiation from stars, planets, comets and other celestial objects -- was cut short by 24 hours TC to avoid rain forecast for California's Edwards Air Force Base.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
It was a sort of homecoming for Johns Hopkins University astronomer Arthur F. Davidsen. Only in this case, "home" was TC billion light years away.At 6:40 p.m. yesterday, after suffering through more technical difficulties, astronauts aboard the space shuttle Columbia turned the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) toward a brilliant object in the constellation Virgo known only as 3C273.The object, the brightest quasar in the sky, is more than a billion light years beyond the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
Astronomers at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., were described as "worried" today as equipment failures continued to plague their $148 million Astro Observatory aboard the space shuttle Columbia.The four Astro telescopes were idled for nine hours overnight after a computer on board the shuttle failed."Since then, the computer has come back up and we are able to point, but for most of the night things haven't been stable enough to do observations," said Knox Long, a spokesman for the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope team at Marshall.
NEWS
By Luther Young | December 11, 1990
The space shuttle Columbia returned to Earth early this morning, carrying a battle-tested crew that overcame telescope-pointing problems and a threatening backup of wastewater to squeeze a surprising amount of science from a mission that at times seemed jinxed.Originally scheduled for 10 days, the Astro-1 mission -- to study invisible ultraviolet and X-ray radiation from stars, planets, comets and other celestial objects -- was cut short by 24 hours TC to avoid rain forecast for California's Edwards Air Force Base.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
Astronomers at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., were described as "worried" today as equipment failures continued to plague their $148 million Astro Observatory aboard the space shuttle Columbia.The four Astro telescopes were idled for nine hours overnight after a computer on board the shuttle failed."Since then, the computer has come back up and we are able to point, but for most of the night things haven't been stable enough to do observations," said Knox Long, a spokesman for the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope team at Marshall.
NEWS
By Luther Young and Luther Young,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 4, 1990
GREENBELT -- The Astro-1 observatory -- finally launched Sunday after years of delays -- lost a day of precious observing time before astronauts grabbed the reins from a malfunctioning automatic pointing system and began manually directing the telescopes at celestial targets."
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