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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Owls can rotate their heads a dizzying 270 degrees, allowing them to see what's happening behind them while perched on a tree branch or barn beam. This evolutionary adaptation helps the birds keep their fixed-socket, binocular eyes trained on the scurrying mice and other small prey they hunt. But how exactly do their necks seemingly defy the limitations of bones and blood vessels as they swivel around like a submarine periscope? Fabian de Kok-Mercado, a Johns Hopkins-trained medical illustrator and an owl enthusiast, was curious.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
While the Johns Hopkins football team ushers in a new season, Ryan Rice is also grasping something new: his position. For the previous three years, Rice lined up at cornerback, where he made 87 tackles, intercepted four balls, and broke up 12 passes in his career. Last fall, he had a career-high three interceptions and added 27 tackles and four pass break-ups. Those numbers contributed to him being named a second-team preseason All-American by D3football.com. But this year, Rice is moving to safety - a switch he has embraced.
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Every year, health organizations spend millions in the developing world attacking the iron-deficiency disorder known as anemia. They pay special attention to pregnant women, a population highly vulnerable to the disease. Every year, though, 115,000 of those women die in childbirth from anemia-related problems. More than 600,000 infants do the same. "We've known for a long time that maternal anemia is one of the great causes of death in mothers and newborns," said Wendy Taylor, director of the Center for Accelerating Impact and Innovation at the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1996
It may be the age of plastic money, plastic explosives and plastic surgery, but here's something you probably hadn't thought of:Plastic batteries.Johns Hopkins University engineers have developed a plastic battery that is as thin as a credit card and even more flexible. The Air Force has been sponsoring the research in hopes of getting a lightweight, cheap and versatile power source for satellites and weapons.But such a product could also have enormous commercial potential, a prospect sure to be boosted by today's announcement that Popular Science magazine deems the battery one of the top 100 new products, technology developments and scientific achievements of the year.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2000
As far as medical diagnostic devices go, magnetic resonance imaging is tough to beat. The technology, in use less than 20 years, has unquestionably improved the ability of physicians to make accurate diagnoses of a range of diseases affecting organs and other soft tissues, say experts. Now, after almost five years of research, a team of Johns Hopkins University doctors and bioengineers have come up with a way to make MRI even more helpful to medicine and somewhat less arduous for patients.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | May 24, 2007
It is not as experienced or airtight as it was two years ago. Back then, the defense was dotted with All-Americans and typically set the tone for a Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team that went undefeated and won the school's first NCAA title since 1987. This year's Blue Jays defense has been shaped in part by youth, injuries, changing roles, an inspirational comeback story, and an evolution that included some serious stumbles in the early going. And one of the reasons the third-seeded Blue Jays (11-4)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | February 27, 1991
Nursing home residents who suffer from depression have a much higher death rate than do residents in good mental health, but the disorder is seldom diagnosed and treated by their physicians, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine researchers reported yesterday.Dr. Barry W. Rovner, a Hopkins psychiatrist who led the study, said the research shows that too many physicians regard the overriding sadness suffered by many elderly people to be a normal symptom of aging -- rather than a definable, treatable illness that can kill when it is ignored.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | March 10, 1991
The golden '20s are the most enduring literary cliche in the American canon, but for Robert Roy, retired dean emeritus of engineering at Johns Hopkins University, that decade was real life, not fiction.Last year Mr. Roy put the finishing touches on a family memoir -- privately circulated among friends and colleagues -- that tinkles with F. Scott Fitzgerald nostalgia and comments on the ways of life when the gin was in the bathtub and the brokers were in the chips.Included in the memoir is a story about Mr. Roy's heady athlete days.
SPORTS
By Jim Hogan and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
As the national anthem plays before a Johns Hopkins women's soccer game, No. 13 for the Blue Jays stands in line with her teammates facing the flag. Her mind is fast at work before every game as she visualizes herself finishing from different spots on the field. Hannah Kronick, a junior forward, leads the Blue Jays (10-0-0 overall, 3-0-0 Centennial Conference) in goals (10) and assists (4) in helping the team to its highest ranking in its 22-year history: No. 2 in the National Soccer Coaches Association of America Division III poll.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
While the main campus of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is open and inviting, there is another division of the school that discourages visitors. The Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory is tucked miles away in Laurel, with building access blocked by guards. Outsiders enter with an approved escort for the most part, handing over proof of identity first. Much of what goes on in there is secret — including some of the billions of dollars in work the lab does for the federal government.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Lloyd M. Bunting Jr., a four-time All-American lacrosse player who was one of the outstanding Johns Hopkins University players of the late 1940s, died July 6 of complications from a staph infection at the Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. He was 87. "If I were to pick one athlete whose credentials stood out in my 65 years at Hopkins, it would be Lloyd," said Robert H. "Bob" Scott, who was a midfielder on the 1950 lacrosse team with Mr. Bunting and later coached the sport at Hopkins for two decades.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins has dropped three of its past four contests and fallen to No. 15 in The Sun's rankings. But the Blue Jays team that has struggled to a 6-4 record is not the one that No. 4 Maryland (8-1) is anticipating for Saturday's showdown at Byrd Stadium in College Park. Coach John Tillman pointed out that John Hopkins sprinted to an 11-1 advantage en route to a 15-8 demolition of No. 16 Virginia on March 23 and owned a 10-9 lead with less than two minutes left in regulation before falling, 11-10, in overtime to No. 3 North Carolina.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Owls can rotate their heads a dizzying 270 degrees, allowing them to see what's happening behind them while perched on a tree branch or barn beam. This evolutionary adaptation helps the birds keep their fixed-socket, binocular eyes trained on the scurrying mice and other small prey they hunt. But how exactly do their necks seemingly defy the limitations of bones and blood vessels as they swivel around like a submarine periscope? Fabian de Kok-Mercado, a Johns Hopkins-trained medical illustrator and an owl enthusiast, was curious.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Scientists who study sleep understand that light has a dark side, because it can interrupt natural rhythms, causing the mood and learning problems that go with lack of rest. Johns Hopkins University researchers have taken the understanding a step further and to a cellular level, finding that exposure to bright light at night appears to create these problems by itself, even apart from sleep patterns. Since the research was published online weeks ago in the journal Nature, biology professor Samer Hattar, who led the research team, has been much in demand as a speaker.
NEWS
By WILLIAM McCLOSKEY | July 11, 1994
When two of the great singers of our time, Jose Carreras and Marilyn Horne, sing together tonight at Wolf Trap for the benefit of leukemia-related foundations, the extraordinary concert will have personal significance for me. Twenty-five years ago I was one of the first leukemia marrow-transplant donors.Both singers have volunteered for personal reasons. Miss Horne's father died of leukemia. A marrow transplant in 1987 enabled Mr. Carreras to survive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A quarter-century ago when my sister contracted this same leukemia, it was a quick death sentence.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | July 1, 1998
IN TWO weeks, the eyes of the world's lacrosse fans will be on Baltimore, the internationally recognized "mecca of lacrosse," the largest event in the history of the sport will be held at Johns Hopkins University's Homewood Field July 16-24.A paid attendance of 70,000 fans is expected to jam Hopkins' newly expanded grandstands for an eight-day tournament featuring teams from the 11 member nations of the International Lacrosse Federation. Joining the defending champion Team USA (boasting a large contingent of local talent)
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Every year, health organizations spend millions in the developing world attacking the iron-deficiency disorder known as anemia. They pay special attention to pregnant women, a population highly vulnerable to the disease. Every year, though, 115,000 of those women die in childbirth from anemia-related problems. More than 600,000 infants do the same. "We've known for a long time that maternal anemia is one of the great causes of death in mothers and newborns," said Wendy Taylor, director of the Center for Accelerating Impact and Innovation at the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | November 18, 2011
Want to see a small-college football program that gets it? Gets its core mission and still is wildly successful? Coached by a guy who doesn't think he's God just because he walks the sideline with a set of headphones and a play chart on Saturdays in the fall? Then come out to Homewood Field on Saturday and watch undefeated Johns Hopkins play St. John Fisher of Rochester, N.Y., in the first NCAA home playoff game in Blue Jays history. Go watch the Jays' terrific quarterback, senior Hewitt Tomlin, the Centennial Conference's Offensive Player of the Year.
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