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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
A group of Johns Hopkins University students have turned a staircase into a giant keyboard. It took about five hours for members of the Hopkins Robotics Club to wire a staircase in Hackerman Hall to sound like a piano, according to a university web site . As you walk up, the first step chimes "C," the next "D" and so on, up the stairs. Some students and professors have mastered the fancy footwork to play a song on the musical stairs.  One club member can play " Frere Jacques " by hanging onto the banisters and kicking his feet up the steps.  Club members told The Hub , a university web site, that they hoped the project would spark an interest in robotics.   
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By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
More than two dozen Johns Hopkins University students and staff painted the corridors of the 29th Street Community Center on Saturday as part of the school's annual President's Day of Service. Among them was the university's president himself. Crouching on his knees with brush in hand to cover a few hard-to-reach spots on the walls outside the center's main office, Hopkins President Ronald J. Daniels modeled roles he wanted students to play when he launched the community service day in 2009.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Johns Hopkins University students are brainy about many things. University officials are the first to admit that walking isn't one of them. In the wake of a program last spring that included giving students "I Practice Safe X-ing" T-shirts, Hopkins is stepping up its efforts to make sure students are walking safely with what it's calling its “Road Scholar” campaign. Baltimore will notice it, too, as thousands of canary-colored shoes start appearing today near the intersection of St. Paul and 33rd streets.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Polyurethane foam, long used in products such as bedding, furniture and insulation to make people more comfortable, someday also may save lives. Eight Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering students have devised a tool that may stop profuse bleeding by injecting the foam into those wounded on the battlefield. As a class project, the students chose to tackle the problem of hemorrhaging, the top cause of death for service members in war. Existing devices - tourniquets and medicated bandages - can be unusable or ineffective in wounds to the neck or where limbs meet the torso.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Two Johns Hopkins doctoral students won third place in a national biomedical engineering contest for their invention: a quiet, hands-free and discreet breast pump. Called the Gala Pump, after the Greek word for milk, the device fits inside a bra and is designed to allow nursing mothers to "discreetly pump in the presence of others," should they need to, according to a statement from Hopkins. Inventors Adriana Blazeski and Susan Thompson, who created the concept after having her first child two years ago and returning to work and graduate school, launched a company called DS Labs to develop the pump. They plan to soon seek approval to test the prototype on nursing moms -- which the contest judges likely were not, or the inventors would have placed higher.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
I literally choked on my coffee when I read the first sentence of your editorial, "Hopkins students get it right, at last," (April 11). Let me quote it now that I've recovered. "The bright young people in student government at the John Hopkins University no doubt pride themselves on their openness to a diversity of views and their commitment to the free exchange of ideas. " Are you kidding me? Was this said tongue in cheek or are you so blatantly biased that you said this in all sincerity?
NEWS
April 15, 2014
We came to this university to learn how to practice the best medicine in the world. We know that the mission of Johns Hopkins Medicine is "to improve the health of the community and the world," and we embrace this commitment to making Baltimore better. We also believe that good jobs paying living wages are essential for people to realize their full health potential. Though we are neither union negotiators nor experts in this hospital's finances, we believe that Hopkins should be able to afford to pay its employees a higher wage to lift them out of poverty and enrich our Baltimore community.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
More than two dozen Johns Hopkins University students and staff painted the corridors of the 29th Street Community Center on Saturday as part of the school's annual President's Day of Service. Among them was the university's president himself. Crouching on his knees with brush in hand to cover a few hard-to-reach spots on the walls outside the center's main office, Hopkins President Ronald J. Daniels modeled roles he wanted students to play when he launched the community service day in 2009.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
David Simon rolled up his sleeves as he prepared to hit the hall full of Johns Hopkins students with his sermon of disillusionment. "There is nothing that makes me optimistic about the future of the country," he said, responding to one student's question about hopeful signs for her generation. Simon's Baltimore-based crime drama, "The Wire," is now part of the curriculum at Hopkins. Students had spent three months admiring the show's painful candor as it tackled the issues facing their newly adopted city.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
When Johns Hopkins University civil engineering student Erin Kelly was assigned a class project to design a steel structure, her thoughts went to her sorority "big sister," Miriam Frankl. Frankl, a fellow Hopkins student, was killed last year in a hit-and-run crash involving a chronic drunk driver while she was crossing St. Paul Street near campus. Kelly thought it would be fitting to make her project the design of a pedestrian bridge that might keep other Hopkins students safe. So she teamed up with two engineering school classmates, Charlotte Healy and Alison Ignatowski, to research what it would take to build a bridge across Charles Street — the main north-south road through campus — and whether there was a demand for it. Kelly said that would be a better location for the bridge than the site on St. Paul Street where Frankl was killed.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
The U.S. Department of Education has opened a formal investigation into the Johns Hopkins University's response to an alleged rape at a fraternity house, the university disclosed Tuesday. A group of students filed a complaint with the department's Office of Civil Rights earlier this year, arguing that the university had violated the Clery Act and Title IX, federal laws that dictate how crimes like sexual assault should be handled by universities and reported to the public. Officials said they were notified of the investigation on Friday.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 5, 2014
The tree still lives at the corner of Wolfe and Monument streets, in the midst of the sprawling Johns Hopkins Hospital complex of East Baltimore. The tree lives in memory of Alan Trimakas, a medical student who never got to be the doctor he wanted to be and that the world surely needed. Classmates of Trimakas planted the tree a few months after his senseless, infuriating death. A senior in the Hopkins medical school, Trimakas specialized in internal medicine and cardiology; he wanted to be a cardiologist.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
There was a mistake, Johns Hopkins University officials told Amanda Valledor at Thursday's graduation.  Her diploma had been misplaced, and the biomedical engineering student would have to wait, they said.  A few minutes later, a man came to hand Valledor the diploma. It was her father, Col. John Valledor, whom she had not seen since he left for Afghanistan last year.  He had not been scheduled to return home until next month.  Valledor, 22, froze for an instant, then ran into her father's arms.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, Erica L. Green and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The Johns Hopkins University has come under fire for not disclosing to the campus an alleged rape at a fraternity house, leading a group of students to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education and others to stage a protest Friday. Amid the pressure, President Ronald J. Daniels said Friday that the university would immediately begin an independent review of how the case was handled, and officials pledged "scrupulous self-examination. " Officials also defended their commitment to campus safety.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 10, 2013
Johns Hopkins University sophomore Ely Manstein wasn't sure what to make of the flier that Charlotte Zarzar handed him as he was walking along North Charles Street between classes Sept. 3. Manstein, a biophysics major from Philadelphia, studied the card-shaped flier from the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, which is trying to raise public awareness of pedestrian and bicyclist safety as part of its annual Street Smart campaign. In bold letters and numbers, the card told a cautionary story of 32 pedestrians killed and 2,187 injured in traffic accidents in Baltimore from 2009 to 2011, according to three-year crash data by the city Department of Transportation and the Maryland Highway Safety Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
When a passion for "Game of Thrones" meets up with the kind of inquisitive mind it takes to be a physics grad student at a school like Johns Hopkins University, what you get is the "circumbinary" hypothesis of weird weather seasons in Westeros. Don't mock it unless you have a better explanation as to how "summer can last for decade, winter for a generation" in the fictional world of "Thrones. " I love the kind of intellectual fun these JHU students are having with the the series.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
More than 2,000 Social Security numbers of former Johns Hopkins University graduate students were exposed to potential hackers, the university confirmed Saturday. Hopkins officials discovered on March 19 that the names and Social Security numbers of 2,166 former students were stored on a server that was accessible to the Internet, said Dennis O'Shea, a university spokesman. "Somebody had stashed them on a machine, not realizing that when they did that, the files would be accessible on the Internet," O'Shea said.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
We came to this university to learn how to practice the best medicine in the world. We know that the mission of Johns Hopkins Medicine is "to improve the health of the community and the world," and we embrace this commitment to making Baltimore better. We also believe that good jobs paying living wages are essential for people to realize their full health potential. Though we are neither union negotiators nor experts in this hospital's finances, we believe that Hopkins should be able to afford to pay its employees a higher wage to lift them out of poverty and enrich our Baltimore community.
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