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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
THE JOHNS Hopkins medical campus has had a nursing school since 1889, but it hasn't had a building dedicated solely to nursing education and research until this week.When the $17.2 million Anne M. Pinkard Building opened for classes Monday, it became the first permanent home for Hopkins' School of Nursing, which had shared space with other Hopkins departments.Constructed at 525 N. Wolfe St., between Jefferson and McElderry streets, the six-level building enables Hopkins to consolidate nursing programs and departments that were scattered over six sites on two campuses.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Using live pigs to train future doctors in surgery is unethical and unnecessary, members of a health and animal rights group said Thursday during a protest of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine says Hopkins is one of four schools around the country that still use animals in training. About two dozen doctors and others held signs outside Johns Hopkins Hospital reading "Baltimore Deserves Better" and "End Animal Labs.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
U.S. News and World Report ranked the Johns Hopkins University's School of Education No. 1 in the nation for graduate education programs, above two state programs better known as teaching schools: University of Maryland, College Park at No. 26 and Towson University at No. 116. The annual rankings of graduate schools in various disciplines is being released, and it gives the education program at Hopkins the top billing for the first time, up from...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Dr. M. Daniel Lane, a retired Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researcher, biochemist and esteemed teacher who studied the body's chemical processes that affect hunger, died of myeloma April 10 at the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Washington resident was 83. Colleagues said he typically arrived at his classroom at 6 a.m. and filled numerous sliding blackboards with notes for the day's material. These became known as the "Lane Lectures. " Dr. Paul Rothman, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Dr. Lane "a premier scientist and one of our most cherished colleagues.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
Viiu Ann Vellisto Klein, a native of Estonia and a laboratory technician at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine since 1975, died Monday of cancer at her home in Perry Hall. She was 66. "We had a surprise party for her last year, and people came from all over the world," said Dr. Paul T. Englund, who heads the Hopkins lab where she worked studying the biochemistry of parasitic protozoa. Mrs. Klein's role went beyond conducting experiments, and she befriended graduate students studying to become scientists.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Johns Hopkins UniversityStaff Writer | December 21, 1992
Baltimore philanthropist Zanvyl Krieger has pledged $50 million to the Johns Hopkins University over the next five years, the institution's biggest gift ever and one of the largest in the history of American higher education.Mr. Krieger, an 86-year-old businessman and lawyer who graduated from Hopkins in 1928, stipulated that he will match up to $50 million in gifts to the endowment for the university's financially strapped School of Arts and Sciences.University officials are confident they can raise the $50 million in matching funds, although it will require stepped-up giving to the arts and sciences' endowment, which has recently been receiving about $4 million in gifts a year.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
Ranice W. Crosby, an accomplished medical illustrator and the first woman to be a department head at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died in her sleep on Feb. 18 at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore. She was 91. The daughter of a salesman and a bookkeeper, Ranice W. Birch was born in Regina, Saskatchewan. Upon completing high school in Providence, R.I., she attended the Connecticut College for Women, graduating in 1937. She took a job at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1937 and began her studies in medical illustration under the department's first director, Max Brodel.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2004
Dr. Jack Wexler, a retired cardiologist who taught at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died of heart complications May 13 at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Florida at age 91. A former resident of Mount Washington and Pikesville, he had moved to Longboat Key, Fla., in 1975. Born in Ukraine, he fled with his family because of persecution of Jews. They traveled across Europe for three years before reaching the United States and settling in Boston. He carried the family wealth in gold buttons, covered in cloth, sewed in double rows on his long coat.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
Maryland universities placed prominently in this spring's batch of graduate and professional school rankings of U.S. News and World Report, a reputation-based survey that sends campus administrators scrambling each year to tout their successes and downplay their drops.In Maryland, the jump by the University of Maryland College Park's Clark School of Engineering was perhaps most marked in the new survey, published in Monday's edition of the magazine. It rose 10 places to 18th, ahead of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Harvard University.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY -- Brian Krabak's first patient at the athletes' clinic was a skier with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee, eager to get back on the slopes. Not much swelling, not much pain, fairly good mobility. Diagnosis? "I'd tell my patient, `You're psycho,' " Krabak says with a laugh. A brutal assessment, perhaps, but understandable given that the patient was the doctor himself. Krabak, 34, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, is pulling shifts at the clinic at the Olympic Village, treating patients for everything from ligament tears to "reoccurring things, run-of-the-mill strains and contusions."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
U.S. News and World Report ranked the Johns Hopkins University's School of Education No. 1 in the nation for graduate education programs, above two state programs better known as teaching schools: University of Maryland, College Park at No. 26 and Towson University at No. 116. The annual rankings of graduate schools in various disciplines is being released, and it gives the education program at Hopkins the top billing for the first time, up from...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Dr. Raymond Seltser, former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health who was the author of seminal epidemiological articles on smoking, stroke and radiation, died Feb. 16 of pneumonia at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He was 90. The son of a tailor and a homemaker, Raymond Seltser was born and raised in Boston. He graduated from Boston Latin School in 1941. "His parents expected him to go into medicine, but he never wanted to practice," said a son, Barry Jay Seltser of Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
Date: Nov. 9 Her story: Gwyneth Susil, 34, grew up in Bethesda. She is a pediatrician in pursuit of a position in North Carolina, where she moved to live with her husband-to-be last fall. Her mother, Joan Weigel, a homemaker, and father, George Weigel, a Catholic theologian, live in Bethesda. In 2010, Gwyneth's first husband, Robert Susil, died of cancer. Their son William is 7. His story: Jeffrey "Jeff" Spaeder, 46, grew up in Pittsburgh. He is the chief medical and scientific officer for Quintiles, a biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Durham, N.C. His parents, Leo and Frances Spaeder, both retired, live in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
Hundreds of Baltimore students started 2014 exploring a sprawling new campus that officials say will become a national model for urban education reform. The highly anticipated Elmer A. Henderson School, run by the Johns Hopkins University and Morgan State University, opened its doors Thursday to more than 350 students who have been waiting several years to move from small portable classrooms to the 90,000-square-foot building. "It's huge," Onya Boyd said as she walked up and down the school's hallways, well after the bell rang, in search of her daughter's third-grade classroom.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
The residents and redevelopers of East Baltimore agree that the $42 million school taking shape on 7 acres along Ashland Avenue symbolizes hope for the community. But they disagree about which children should be able to attend the much-heralded new school. The long-planned Elmer A. Henderson School, to be operated by Johns Hopkins and Morgan State universities, was designed to be a neighborhood anchor and a magnet for new residents. Known as Henderson-Hopkins, the campus is part of the East Baltimore Development Inc. plan that also calls for more than 1,500 homes and 1.7 million square feet of laboratory, office and retail space next to the Hopkins hospital complex.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
Dr. Jerome D. Frank, a retired John Hopkins professor of psychiatry who was widely known as an early and outspoken critic of nuclear weapons, died yesterday of complications from dementia at Roland Park Place, his home for the past nine years. He was 95. A New York City native educated at Harvard University and its medical school, Dr. Frank came to the Hopkins in 1940 as a junior assistant resident to study under Dr. Adolf Meyer, founder of its department of psychiatry. After several years, he became an Army psychiatrist and served with Hopkins physicians in the Pacific -- an experience that gave him insight into the psychological effects of war on the health and well-being of soldiers.
NEWS
July 22, 1998
An article in Tuesday's Maryland section incorrectly reported that researchers at Johns Hopkins Hospital proposed a study to determine whether heroin should be given to addicts to help prevent crime. The proposal was made by researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/22/98
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