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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 8, 1997
The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions has filled out its leadership team, formally designating four more senior officials to aid the campus' medical czar, Dr. Edward Miller, in running the university's medical school and research hospital.Miller was placed in charge of the East Baltimore medical complex a year ago and has operated with an ad-hoc group of advisers who are aiding his drive to continue the center's push into the new world of managed care."Now it's time to get some permanency for these things," said Miller, whose formal title is chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the Hopkins School of Medicine.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Janis Ahalt Riker, a retired attorney and business owner who also ran a Howard County antiquarian bookshop, died of cancer April 8 at her home in Portland, Ore. She was 69 and had lived in Columbia for many years. Born Janis Kay Ahalt in Baltimore and raised on Hillendale Road, she was the daughter of Charles Ahalt, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad conductor, and Pauline Prebish Ahalt, a homemaker. She was a 1962 graduate of Towson High School and was selected to participate in the St. Timothy's School summer Latin American Seminar.
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BUSINESS
November 15, 1993
BALTIMORE* Nov. 13-18: Professional Lawn Care Association at Hyatt Regency. Contact Carol Moceri, 1000 Johnson Ferry Road N.E., Suite C-135, Marietta, Ga. 30068-2112. Expected attendance: 4,000.* Nov. 14-18: Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Uses in the Life Sciences. Contact Jeanne Ryan, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Turner 20, 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21205. Attendees: 1,000.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 10, 2011
Shirley A. Mark, a retired psychologist and educator, died May 28 of Parkinson's disease at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Mount Washington resident was 83. The former Shirley Alpern was born and raised in Pittsburgh, where she graduated from Allderdice High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1947 from the University of Pittsburgh. She later earned a master's degree and certificate in clinical psychology from City College of New York in 1949.
NEWS
November 24, 1994
In Sunday's Perspective section, an article on federal funding for research universities may have left the impression that the new $140 million cancer center at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions had been delayed. While concern over funding did delay the start of construction, it is under way.* The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
January 16, 1995
Here is a sampling of services honoring the memory of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.:TODAY* 20th annual memorial breakfast sponsored by the YMCA of Greater Baltimore, Martin's West, 6817 Dogwood Road. 7:30 a.m. Information: 837-9622.* Seventh annual memorial breakfast sponsored by the Baltimore Teachers Union and the Federation of Maryland Teachers, Omni Inner Harbor hotel. 9:45 a.m. Information: 358-6600.TOMORROW* Hopkins King Tribute, noon, Turner Auditorium at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
NEWS
June 5, 1991
The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions' dedication this week of two buildings, one at each of its East Baltimore campuses, keeps Baltimore in the forefront of medical research.Such developments create the nonprofit infrastructure on which industry and employment can grow. It is part of the unfolding vision reflected in the Greater Baltimore Committee's report, "Baltimore: Where Science Comes to Life," urging concerted development based on the biomedical research and medical care facilities in this region.
NEWS
February 19, 2006
On February 16, 2006, DOROTHYELIZABETH (nee Lang) SMITH beloved wife of the late Arthur M. Smith Sr., devoted mother of Roger F. Smith Sr., and the late Arthur M. Smith Jr., dear grandmother of Cynthia S. Claffey, Roger F. Smith Jr., and Amy Marie Smith, dear great-grandmother of Jonathan, Aidan and Elise Claffey and Aaron and Abigail Smith. She is also survived by numerous loving nieces and nephews and grand nieces and grand nephews. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook)
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | November 4, 1997
Medical experts will discuss hysterectomy and its alternatives as well as dozens of other topics concerning women's health on Nov. 22 at the Inner Harbor."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | November 15, 2001
Creepy and original, it's `Sunset Boulevard' The final attraction of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions' fall film series, "Emigres and Divas: The Muse in Exile," is Billy Wilder's creepiest and most original movie, Sunset Boulevard, showing at 7:15 tonight in the Preclinical Teaching Building, 725 N. Wolfe St. The anti-hero of this charged 1950 melodrama is a debt-ridden screenwriter, Joe Gillis (William Holden). On the lam from the finance company that's trying to repossess his car, he wheels into a seemingly abandoned estate that actually belongs to silent-era legend Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson)
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Perimenopause is that transitional time when a woman goes from having regular periods to ending menstruation. Dr. Howard A. Zacur, professor of reproductive endocrinology and director of the division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, says not all women experience the same symptoms; some may not experience perimenopause at all. At 7 p.m. Feb. 24, Zacur will speak about perimenopause and answer questions...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
A film series spotlighting the work of Joel and Ethan Coen, whose No Country for Old Men dominated February's Academy Awards, will unspool Wednesdays through June in the Mountcastle Auditorium of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions Pre-Clinical Teaching Building, 725 N. Wolfe St. The series kicks off Wednesday with No Country for Old Men, starring Josh Brolin, Javier Bardem, Tommy Lee Jones, Woody Harrelson and Kelly Macdonald in the sordid tale of...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 1, 2008
A black man approached me on Guilford Avenue in Baltimore the other day and struck up a friendly, walk-and-talk conversation about Barack Obama. The conversation lasted only five minutes, and, remarkably, the stranger did most of the talking, ending with this parting shot: Don't dismiss the Rev. Jeremiah Wright's suggestion that the U.S. government created the AIDS virus to kill black people as the irrational ravings of an overwrought preacher. "I mean," the man said, "look at what Johns Hopkins did with that sludge.
NEWS
June 9, 2006
ELECTIONS Dr. Nancy E. Davidson, director of the breast cancer program at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, has been elected president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology for a one-year term beginning in June 2007. She assumed office as president-elect during ASCO's annual meeting in Atlanta last week. Davidson has served in a variety of leadership positions with ASCO, including co-chairwoman of the Breast Cancer Surveillance Expert Panel. Davidson is a specialist in research into the role of hormones -- particularly estrogen -- on gene expression and cell growth, and has led several national clinical trials to explore potential breast cancer therapies.
NEWS
February 19, 2006
On February 16, 2006, DOROTHYELIZABETH (nee Lang) SMITH beloved wife of the late Arthur M. Smith Sr., devoted mother of Roger F. Smith Sr., and the late Arthur M. Smith Jr., dear grandmother of Cynthia S. Claffey, Roger F. Smith Jr., and Amy Marie Smith, dear great-grandmother of Jonathan, Aidan and Elise Claffey and Aaron and Abigail Smith. She is also survived by numerous loving nieces and nephews and grand nieces and grand nephews. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook)
NEWS
By LIZ BOWIE and LIZ BOWIE,SUN REPORTER | February 2, 2006
The Johns Hopkins Institutions are announcing today an anonymous $100 million donation to support a broad range of projects at the medical and undergraduate campuses. The gift to Hopkins is the largest since 2001, when clothing industry billionaire Sidney Kimmel gave $150 million to the university and the hospital for cancer research and patient care. "It is an extraordinary gift to Hopkins," said Dr. William R. Brody, president of the Johns Hopkins University. The private donation will support stem cell research, the renovation of Gilman Hall on the Homewood campus, initiatives at the School of Public Health and the construction of a $275 million Children's Tower at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, which is to begin in June.
NEWS
By Frederick Rasmussen and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2000
Dr. Philip Franklin Wagley, a prominent Baltimore internist who created and taught a highly regarded course in medical ethics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Thursday of bone marrow cancer at his home in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. He was 83. From his office in an elegant brownstone townhouse at 9 E. Chase St., next to the Belvedere Hotel, Dr. Wagley practiced internal medicine from 1950 until retiring in 1990. Through the years, his patients included writer H.L. Mencken and poet Ogden Nash as well as the prominent and not-so-prominent from across the world who came to Baltimore to consult with him about their ailments.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
Life shows that some people are planners and some are doers. Which is another way of saying that even the best plans have no chance of being realized unless people make things happen.The city has now targeted the vicinity of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in East Baltimore for one of the most ambitious revival plans since the development of Charles Center and the Inner Harbor. No one is certain yet about the source of financing, but consultants have outlined some challenging goals.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 28, 2006
Owen Hannaway, a Johns Hopkins University historian who focused on science in early modern Europe, died of complications from a stroke Jan. 21 at Keswick Multi-Care Center, where he had lived for three years. He had lived earlier in Guilford. He was 66. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, he was educated at St. Aloysius College, a Roman Catholic high school. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry at the University of Glasgow in 1957 and his doctorate there eight years later. Concerned about the perils of handling explosive compounds that would be a part of working as a chemist, he decided to focus on the history of chemistry, family members said.
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