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NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Mark Hyman and Michael Ollove and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writers | December 12, 1994
A year ago, when Johns Hopkins Hospital snared the husband-and-wife medical team of Sam Ritter and Rebecca Snider, the hospital seemed well on its way to restoring the luster to its once-proud division of pediatric cardiology."
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 14, 1992
Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Hospital tethered a 25-year-old woman to a pig's liver in August to save her from certain death, then transplanted a human organ into her the next day when one suddenly became available.It is thought to have been the first successful use of an animal liver as a bridge to a human transplant.The announcement at Hopkins Hospital came yesterday, a day after a woman who had received a transplanted pig liver at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles died of complications from acute liver failure, though the animal's liver had been functioning, doctors said.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | January 10, 1991
A 20-year-old man who escaped from Johns Hopkins Hospital on Sunday after taking a gun from a city officer and shooting at four other officers was arrested yesterday on the roof of a house in East Baltimore, police said.Oswald Gerald Trayham of the 700 block of Wharton Court was arrested about 10 a.m. by police who had received a tip that he was hiding in a house in the 1200 block of East Preston Street, said Dennis S. Hill, a police spokesman.A .38-caliber revolver believed to belong to a city police officer was found in the chimney of the building where Mr. Trayham was captured, Mr. Hill said.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,sun reporter | July 13, 2007
For the 17th year in a row, Johns Hopkins Hospital is No. 1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of America's best hospitals. The magazine's annual rankings, released today, put the East Baltimore institution first in four specialties: ear, nose and throat; gynecology; rheumatology and urology. Hopkins ranked second in geriatrics, neurology and neurosurgery and psychiatry, while Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute ranked second in ophthalmology. Hopkins hospital also earned high marks in specialties such as cancer, digestive diseases, endocrinology, kidney disease, respiratory disorders, and heart and heart surgery.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Staff Writer Staff Writer William B. Talbott contributed to this story | May 28, 1992
A man was found fatally wounded early today seated in the passenger side of a pickup truck in the 100 block of N. Central Ave.A passer-by came on the shooting scene about 12:40 a.m. and flagged down a police car. The man was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he dead on arrival at 1 a.m. without regaining consciousness.Police said the victim, Alexander Morrison Jr., 37, of the 3400 block of Cornwall Road in Dundalk, was shot five times in the upper body."We know from his position that he was definitely shot while seated on the passenger side of the truck," an investigator said.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL OLLOVE | February 17, 1991
PUT DOWN THAT COPY OF Who's Who. If you want to know who's powerful in Baltimore, the best place to start is the board of trustees at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.It is almost certainly Baltimore's most exclusive club. Unlike any other non-profit institution in town, admission to the hospital board represents a statement in itself. "It signals you have arrived in Baltimore," says Marcella Schuyler, senior vice president and general manager of Manchester Inc., a placement firm for executives.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1996
Officials at the Johns Hopkins University rewarded a much-liked veteran administrator with a top post yesterday, naming Ronald R. Peterson president of Johns Hopkins Hospital.With the appointment, Peterson will take on one of the plum positions in American medical care, although a new administrative structure at Hopkins means that he will have less authority than his nine predecessors.Colleagues described Peterson, 48, as a successful and consensus-building executive who quietly gets things done.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | July 5, 1993
The Johns Hopkins medical institutions have decided to pursue a suburban strategy. Last month they announced that they will build a $10 million four-story medical office building at Green Spring Station in Baltimore County. The facility's tenants will all be doctors who are affiliated with Hopkins and who Hopkins hopes will send their patients downtown to Hopkins Hospital.Market forces and urban realities have driven the Hopkins decision to establish a beachhead in suburbia. To understand the dynamics, consider these simple numbers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
Dr. Russell A. Nelson, the fourth president of Johns Hopkins Hospital whose tenure was marked by significant expansion of its facilities and its emergence as a major medical research center, died Saturday in Naples, Fla. He was 88 and had formerly lived on West University Parkway. During his 21 years as president, $50 million worth of new buildings were built, medical services were expanded in East Baltimore and established in Columbia, and the hospital grew by 300 beds and 2,000 employees.
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