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NEWS
By Gerri Kobren | December 13, 1990
Johns Hopkins Hospital had no legal obligation to inform patients that one of its surgeons had AIDS, a Hopkins attorney said yesterday in the hospital's first response to a lawsuit filed Monday.Paul Rosenberg, the hospital's attorney, said that there are no laws requiring hospitals to discover and disclose that doctors or other workers are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome and that there are laws prohibiting HIV testing of anyone, patient or employee, without their informed consent.
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NEWS
By Roger Twigg | January 10, 1991
A 20-year-old man who escaped from Johns Hopkins Hospital on Sunday after taking a gun from a city officer and shooting at four other officers was arrested yesterday on the roof of a house in East Baltimore, police said.Oswald Gerald Trayham of the 700 block of Wharton Court was arrested about 10 a.m. by police who had received a tip that he was hiding in a house in the 1200 block of East Preston Street, said Dennis S. Hill, a police spokesman.A .38-caliber revolver believed to belong to a city police officer was found in the chimney of the building where Mr. Trayham was captured, Mr. Hill said.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,sun reporter | July 13, 2007
For the 17th year in a row, Johns Hopkins Hospital is No. 1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of America's best hospitals. The magazine's annual rankings, released today, put the East Baltimore institution first in four specialties: ear, nose and throat; gynecology; rheumatology and urology. Hopkins ranked second in geriatrics, neurology and neurosurgery and psychiatry, while Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute ranked second in ophthalmology. Hopkins hospital also earned high marks in specialties such as cancer, digestive diseases, endocrinology, kidney disease, respiratory disorders, and heart and heart surgery.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | July 5, 1993
The Johns Hopkins medical institutions have decided to pursue a suburban strategy. Last month they announced that they will build a $10 million four-story medical office building at Green Spring Station in Baltimore County. The facility's tenants will all be doctors who are affiliated with Hopkins and who Hopkins hopes will send their patients downtown to Hopkins Hospital.Market forces and urban realities have driven the Hopkins decision to establish a beachhead in suburbia. To understand the dynamics, consider these simple numbers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
Dr. Russell A. Nelson, the fourth president of Johns Hopkins Hospital whose tenure was marked by significant expansion of its facilities and its emergence as a major medical research center, died Saturday in Naples, Fla. He was 88 and had formerly lived on West University Parkway. During his 21 years as president, $50 million worth of new buildings were built, medical services were expanded in East Baltimore and established in Columbia, and the hospital grew by 300 beds and 2,000 employees.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL OLLOVE | February 17, 1991
PUT DOWN THAT COPY OF Who's Who. If you want to know who's powerful in Baltimore, the best place to start is the board of trustees at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.It is almost certainly Baltimore's most exclusive club. Unlike any other non-profit institution in town, admission to the hospital board represents a statement in itself. "It signals you have arrived in Baltimore," says Marcella Schuyler, senior vice president and general manager of Manchester Inc., a placement firm for executives.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 5, 1993
PBS puts Baltimore's Johns Hopkins Hospital under a microscope tonight and asks some tough questions about the way medical doctors are trained."Medicine at the Crossroads," an ambitious eight-part series, begins at 9 o'clock on MPT (Channels 22 and 67) with an hourlong look at Hopkins titled "Temple of Science.""The teaching hospital, home to the most advanced technology, the most revered doctors and scientists, the most seriously ill patients," begins narrator George Page as the show opens with a montage of Hopkins images.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1996
Officials at the Johns Hopkins University rewarded a much-liked veteran administrator with a top post yesterday, naming Ronald R. Peterson president of Johns Hopkins Hospital.With the appointment, Peterson will take on one of the plum positions in American medical care, although a new administrative structure at Hopkins means that he will have less authority than his nine predecessors.Colleagues described Peterson, 48, as a successful and consensus-building executive who quietly gets things done.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 9, 2006
No block of Baltimore will undergo a more dramatic transformation in the next two years than the north side of Orleans Street, between Broadway and Wolfe Street. That's where Johns Hopkins Medicine is building an $800 million expansion that will become the institution's face for the 21st century. Hopkins planning directors released a rendering showing that the glass and brick addition will have a contemporary look -- a contrast to the Victorian-era buildings along Broadway. A 12-story adult hospital, a 12-story children's hospital and a common base providing a new main entrance to Hopkins' East Baltimore medical campus will rise on land previously occupied by a garage and other structures.
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