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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union that represents 2,000 service workers ended contract talks without an agreement Tuesday night, despite intervention by the governor. The talks were the first since members of the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union called off a four-day strike last week after Gov. Martin O'Malley asked the two sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. No new bargaining date has been scheduled, but neither side has said it will suspend negotiations.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Johns Hopkins, for decades ranked the best hospital in the country, has been through this before. Two years ago, it fell to No. 2 in the annual U.S. News and World Report rankings, regaining the top spot last year. But No. 3? "What a disaster!" said Dr. Ashish K. Jha, professor of health policy at Harvard School of Public Health, before quickly adding: "Just kidding. While these rankings are interesting, the bottom line is that Hopkins remains one of the very best hospitals in the world.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
A pedestrian was struck and killed by a Charm City Circulator bus near Johns Hopkins Hospital Tuesday morning, police said. The victim was a 50-year-old woman, police said. The department said via Twitter that the incident took place at North Wolfe and East Monument streets. East Monument Street was closed in the area.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
The tentative contract reached early Tuesday between Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union representing about 2,000 of its service workers represents a victory not only for the hospital and members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East but for Baltimore. The contract raises wages, in some case dramatically so, allowing Hopkins to set an example of what a "living wage" can mean for the health and security of workers in this city. It was a hard-fought effort that included a three-day strike in April and, more recently, intervention by Gov. Martin O'Malley to avert another such action.
NEWS
October 8, 1992
An overhaul and expansion of the Johns Hopkins Hospital security force will be regarded with relief by the thousands of people who work at and visit that sprawling East Baltimore institution every day. A world class hospital deserves a first-class security force, and the step-up in security is long overdue. A number of brazen attacks have occurred this year. A medical student was raped, a physician kidnapped, a professor robbed at knife-point in her office.Located at the corner of Wolfe and Monument streets, the hospital is on the fringes of a neighborhood that has grown steadily poorer over the years.
NEWS
February 19, 1995
It is now acknowledged that Johns Hopkins Hospital made a financial blunder in selling its health maintenance organization to Prudential Insurance Co. in 1989 under terms that will cost it millions every year of this decade. It is also acknowledged that Hopkins compounded this mistake by filing a $50 million bad-faith conflict-of-interest suit against Prudential that it had to retract under humiliating circumstances.This unhappy development, however, does not alter the fact that the Johns Hopkins Health System and the Johns Hopkins Medical School remain this city's premier institutions, with a global reputation for excellence and leadership.
NEWS
June 26, 1997
Priscilla Dorsey Howard, who volunteered for many years in the social services department at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died Sunday of heart failure at Goodwin House Retirement Home in Alexandria, Va. She was 98.Miss Howard, who was the daughter of John Duvall Howard and Mary Greenwood Smith Howard, had lived at the Alexandria nursing home since 1974.The former Mount Vernon resident who was raised in Bolton Hill was a 1917 graduate of the Bryn Mawr School and made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | July 30, 1991
Almost 1,000 doctors responding to a survey by U.S. News & World Report ranked Johns Hopkins Hospital among the best in the nation for 13 of 15 specialties -- earning it the magazine's designation as the best hospital overall.In earning that distinction, Johns Hopkins edged out three other hospitals with wide reputations for excellence: the Mayo Clinic of Rochester, Minn.; Massachusetts General Hospital of Boston, and the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.Rounding out the top 10 were: Cleveland Clinic; Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston; Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York; Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C.; Stanford University Hospital in California; and University of California, San Francisco.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | November 1, 1990
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectly identified a woman arrested in a false billing scheme as a former employee of John Hopkins Hospital. In fact, the woman was a former employee of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.* The Sun regrets the errorsA former employee at Johns Hopkins Hospital was arrested yesterday on charges of stealing more than $260,000 in an elaborate scheme that spanned nearly five years.Valerie Aquilano, 41, was arrested early yesterday in her Hamden home.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Johns Hopkins Hospital/Harry and Jeanette Weinberg FoundationSun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | July 28, 1995
An article in Friday's editions of The Sun misstated the amount of money appropriated by the state toward a new comprehensive cancer center at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Maryland General Assembly has authorized $30.5 million for the center.The Sun regrets the error.The Johns Hopkins Hospital has received the single largest gift since its inception 106 years ago -- the pledge of $20 million from the Baltimore-based Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation toward the construction of a clinical building for its comprehensive cancer center.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union that represents 2,000 service workers ended contract talks without an agreement Tuesday night, despite intervention by the governor. The talks were the first since members of the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union called off a four-day strike last week after Gov. Martin O'Malley asked the two sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. No new bargaining date has been scheduled, but neither side has said it will suspend negotiations.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's intervention in the wage fight between Johns Hopkins Hospital and its service workers reflects the lingering dispute's significance but also signals that it may be resolved soon. The hospital and members of the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, went back to the bargaining table Tuesday after the governor asked them to take a cooling-off period. Union leaders also called off a four-day strike that was to have begun Friday.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital will begin a new round of negotiations with the medical institution Tuesday, several days after a strike was averted when Gov. Martin O'Malley asked both sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, is at odds with the hospital mostly over the issue of pay raises. Hospital officials said people's schedules made it better to meet earlier than to take a reprieve.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A four-day strike by service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital that had been scheduled to start Friday was averted after Gov. Martin O'Malley asked both sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, gave the hospital a strike notice last week after talks broke down, mostly over the issue of pay raises. "1199 SEIU has agreed not to strike at this time - I appreciate both sides' willingness to continue negotiating in good faith," O'Malley said in a statement.
NEWS
By Yvonne Brown | June 26, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated from an earlier version to reflect developments.  On Friday, I and 2,000 of my co-workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital were scheduled to go on strike for the second time in two months. It's not a step we wanted to take, but one we felt we had to take. But late yesterday, our union president and Hopkins management agreed to a one-week cooling off period at Gov. Martin O'Malley's request. We hope that time will make a difference. For almost four months, we've been in talks with Hopkins management for a contract that would end poverty pay at our world-renowned hospital.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Steven S. Hsiao, a Johns Hopkins scientist who studied how the brain perceives the shape, size and texture of three-dimensional objects, died of lung cancer June 16 at Hopkins Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 59. "Steve has been a defining part of Hopkins brain science for over three decades," said Ed Connor, a professor of neuroscience and director of the Johns Hopkins University's Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute. Hopkins colleagues said Dr. Hsiao's worked in basic science involving the brain, leading to advancements in complex information processing.
NEWS
By Gerri Kobren | December 13, 1990
Johns Hopkins Hospital had no legal obligation to inform patients that one of its surgeons had AIDS, a Hopkins attorney said yesterday in the hospital's first response to a lawsuit filed Monday.Paul Rosenberg, the hospital's attorney, said that there are no laws requiring hospitals to discover and disclose that doctors or other workers are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome and that there are laws prohibiting HIV testing of anyone, patient or employee, without their informed consent.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
The labor union representing service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital has given the medical institution notice that employees are prepared to strike next week if negotiations over wages remain deadlocked. The notice issued by the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union authorizes a four-day strike beginning June 27 and would be the second strike by the union in two months. The union, which also organized a three-day strike in April, has been negotiating on behalf of 2,000 housekeepers, cooks and other workers.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
Johns Hopkins Hospital's refusal to openly negotiate with its underpaid health care workers is beyond embarrassing but unfortunately revealing of some of the real operating values of this world class institution ( "Thousands gather to protest pay at Hopkins Hospital," May 10). As its' own Bloomberg School of Public Health has researched and demonstrated again and again, one's environment is as important a determinant of health as what goes on inside one's body. Workers who come in every day exhausted, stressed and worried about their family's welfare cannot portray an example of health and well being that the hospital portends is one of its primary values.
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