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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | September 27, 2007
Johns Hopkins Health System was recognized yesterday for its workplace programs designed to better handle employee disputes, increase job opportunities for disabled youths, and to provide promotion advancements and skills training for service workers. Johns Hopkins was one of five recipients of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's third annual Freedom to Compete Award, which recognizes private and public employers for best workplace practices promoting access and inclusion.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Brown | June 26, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated from an earlier version to reflect developments.  On Friday, I and 2,000 of my co-workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital were scheduled to go on strike for the second time in two months. It's not a step we wanted to take, but one we felt we had to take. But late yesterday, our union president and Hopkins management agreed to a one-week cooling off period at Gov. Martin O'Malley's request. We hope that time will make a difference. For almost four months, we've been in talks with Hopkins management for a contract that would end poverty pay at our world-renowned hospital.
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NEWS
September 3, 1997
One of the top officials who have guided the Johns Hopkins Health System into managed care is leaving to lead the University of Texas Medical Branch.Dr. John D. Stobo, who has done extensive research in immunology and rheumatology, has held several positions at Hopkins since 1985, including director of the department of medicine. In 1994, he was appointed chairman and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins HealthCare.He assumes his new position Oct. 1. The University of Texas Medical Branch includes eight hospitals and two institutes.
NEWS
April 25, 2009
Hopkins, Suburban plan hospital merger Johns Hopkins Health System and Suburban Hospital Healthcare System say they are merging to offer more efficient, integrated medical services in the region. The systems announced Friday that the proposed merger is expected in the fall and would no involve any financial exchanges. If the merger happens, Johns Hopkins would completely assume ownership of the Montgomery County-based organization and Suburban Hospital. Both companies say Suburban's name, leadership and daily operations would not change.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | March 10, 1992
A company in Mystic, Conn., has been selected over five other bidders to acquire the former North Charles General Hospital at 2800 N. Charles St. and has until early April to move ahead with its plans for a "high-skill, high-tech" nursing home on the property.Mariner Health Systems, a company with eight other facilities containing a total of 1,000 nursing home beds, has offered to buy the vacant hospital from the Johns Hopkins Health System for $4 million, according to Hopkins spokeswoman Joann Rodgers.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
The staff for Maryland's hospital rate-setting commission yesterday recommended a 6.07 percent increase for Johns Hopkins Hospital. The hospital had been seeking 14.5 percent over two years, but said the recommendation represented a fair compromise. Ronald R. Peterson, chief executive of the Johns Hopkins Health System, told the Health Services Cost Review Commission that the staff recommendation would provide "the absolute minimum Hopkins needs." The commission delayed action on the Hopkins rates.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | February 26, 1991
An atmosphere of gloom and anger settled over the Homewood Hospital Center-South yesterday, as word that the financially troubled hospital will be closed within two to three months filtered out to the 650 people who work there.Nurses, physicians, housekeepers and other employees huddled in small groups inside and outside the hospital, talking somberly about the death of a center-city hospital with a family atmosphere and about their uncertain job prospects.Officials with the Johns Hopkins Health System, which acquired the 213-bed hospital in 1985, announced plans to close the hospital during an afternoon meeting attended by about 100 supervisors.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
MedStar Health has accepted Johns Hopkins Health System's offer to buy the nearby campus of Church Hospital for an undisclosed sum, the two health systems confirmed yesterday.The deal is scheduled to close 30 days after a due diligence period, during which Hopkins will evaluate any environmental or other risks associated with the property, said Gary Stephenson, a Hopkins spokesman.Church occupies two city blocks just south of Hopkins on Broadway in East Baltimore.Hopkins started using the campus' parking garage and parking lots this week.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
In one of its first actions as part of the Johns Hopkins Health System, Howard County General Hospital has named eight Howard County community leaders and health and business professionals to head a new $40 million foundation.The Howard County Community Health Foundation was established with the merger of the hospital, which is now Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. As part of the deal, Hopkins will assume $57 million in Howard County General debt and establish the foundation, which will fund a range of health services, including dental, teen-age pregnancy, drug abuse and disease prevention programs.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
In the first of a planned series of affiliations with community hospitals outside Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Health System and the Hopkins School of Medicine yesterday announced a long-term alliance with hospitals in Harford County.The alliance with Upper Chesapeake Health System, the parent company of Fallston General and Harford Memorial hospitals and a group of family care centers, allows the two sides to develop a variety of services, including a new full-line community health care facility in Harford County, and to bid for managed-care contracts.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun staff reports | September 30, 2008
A program that encourages Johns Hopkins employees to buy homes in certain Baltimore neighborhoods has been expanded, with the amount of the largest grants set at nearly seven times the previous cap. The "Live Near Your Work" program, which had offered up to $2,500 to help with down payments and closing costs, now offers up to $17,000, depending on the neighborhood. Much of the added funding comes from a grant from the Rouse Company Foundation. Most employees of the Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Health System who work full time and are eligible for benefits can participate.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | December 21, 2007
When Dr. Karen Swartz came to Baltimore seeking admission to the Johns Hopkins University's medical school 20 years ago, the first building she noticed was Hopkins' domed administration building, one of the oldest and most recognizable structures at the world-renowned hospital. So, when she learned there was a chance to own part of it - and support a worthy cause in the process - she didn't hesitate. The dome is "the heart of Hopkins," Swartz said. "It is our symbol. To have a piece of it, and give back to the community, is an opportunity I didn't want to pass up."
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | September 27, 2007
Johns Hopkins Health System was recognized yesterday for its workplace programs designed to better handle employee disputes, increase job opportunities for disabled youths, and to provide promotion advancements and skills training for service workers. Johns Hopkins was one of five recipients of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's third annual Freedom to Compete Award, which recognizes private and public employers for best workplace practices promoting access and inclusion.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
Anne Arundel Medical Center and Johns Hopkins Medicine announced yesterday a strategic alliance, giving the Annapolis hospital a chance to take advantage of Hopkins' cachet and programs and providing Hopkins access to more suburban patients. The affiliation will mean that Arundel Medical can offer new services and that the two institutions can share the cost of developing satellite medical centers and other initiatives. It also means AMC will send some patients to Hopkins' giant East Baltimore campus for complex treatments.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 9, 2006
No block of Baltimore will undergo a more dramatic transformation in the next two years than the north side of Orleans Street, between Broadway and Wolfe Street. That's where Johns Hopkins Medicine is building an $800 million expansion that will become the institution's face for the 21st century. Hopkins planning directors released a rendering showing that the glass and brick addition will have a contemporary look -- a contrast to the Victorian-era buildings along Broadway. A 12-story adult hospital, a 12-story children's hospital and a common base providing a new main entrance to Hopkins' East Baltimore medical campus will rise on land previously occupied by a garage and other structures.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 28, 2005
The handsome brick building at Charles and 28th streets started out as a school nearly 100 years ago. It was converted to an office building in the 1980s. Now it's coming full circle and will soon open as a school again. This time around, the former Seton High School won't be a Catholic girls school, as it was before. It's the latest expansion of the Johns Hopkins University into the surrounding Charles Village and will be used by graduate-level Hopkins students. Hopkins bought the five-story building in 2003 and is spending $7.8 million to renovate it for its School for Professional Studies in Business and Education, plus two other divisions.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun staff reports | September 30, 2008
A program that encourages Johns Hopkins employees to buy homes in certain Baltimore neighborhoods has been expanded, with the amount of the largest grants set at nearly seven times the previous cap. The "Live Near Your Work" program, which had offered up to $2,500 to help with down payments and closing costs, now offers up to $17,000, depending on the neighborhood. Much of the added funding comes from a grant from the Rouse Company Foundation. Most employees of the Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Health System who work full time and are eligible for benefits can participate.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | February 6, 1991
After two years of trying to raise capital for a new company aimed at marketing reseachers' ideas, The Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Health System have gotten three corporations to invest $2.25 million.Constellation Holdings Inc. of Baltimore, 3iVentures Corp. of Boston and Whiting-Turner Corp., a local construction company, have invested in Triad Investors Corp. Hopkins would not disclose how much each company invested.Triad was formed in 1988 to identify research at Hopkins that can be marketed and to find seed money for the projects.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2004
There's nothing unusual these days about a hospital marketing itself, but the advertising campaign unveiled yesterday by Johns Hopkins Medicine is a bit different. Although it will eventually run in Baltimore, the campaign is starting nearly 200 miles away, in New York City. It doesn't mention any specific Hopkins services, and rather than showing Hopkins doctors or Hopkins patients, it invokes such figures as jazz great Louis Armstrong, movie star Ingrid Bergman and Winston Churchill.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Jonathan Bor and Erika Niedowski and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2003
Maryland's health department plans to investigate the death of a young cancer patient who received an improperly mixed intravenous solution from the Johns Hopkins Home Care Group, a top state official said yesterday. Carol Benner, director of the department's Office of Health Care Quality, said investigators will try to determine what actions at the Home Care Group and the Johns Hopkins Hospital might have contributed to the death of 34-month-old Brianna Cohen of Owings Mills. Benner, who called the girl's death a "tragedy," said her office will conduct an independent on-site investigation - interviewing doctors and pharmacists and examining Brianna's medical records - rather than rely on Hopkins' account of the incident.
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