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BUSINESS
December 10, 1998
Kaiser Permanente officials are hoping a new agreement wit Johns Hopkins Medicine will attract new customers and strengthen its position in the mid-Atlantic region.The nation's No. 1 HMO, which has about 52,000 members in the Baltimore area, said yesterday that it will allow patients in certain networks to receive care from Hopkins-affiliated physicians after the beginning of the new year. Currently, Kaiser members may see only the HMO's own doctors."We have been unable to sell our choice products in the Baltimore market because of the limited provider network," said Bob Williams, vice president and executive director of Kaiser's Baltimore office.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
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HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The rapid decline in health and ultimate death of a woman from fungal meningitis at Johns Hopkins Hospital after she'd received a tainted steroid injection was outlined by a team of Hopkins doctors in a medical journal article released online Thursday. The article, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, says a 51-year-old woman arrived at a local emergency room at the end of August with a headache "radiating" from the back of her head to her face. She'd received the steroid injection a week earlier.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | March 8, 1991
The Johns Hopkins University has sued two physician groups and the financially troubled parent of the CareFirst health maintenance organization for nearly $500,000 that the university's doctors claim they are owed.The lawsuit alleges that the two physician groups, Maryland Health Physicians Associates and Berdann & Krieger, sent CareFirst members to Hopkins doctors but have failed to pay for LTC medical services.In turn, the suit claims, HealthCare Corporation of America, which owns CareFirst, is liable for any amount that remains unpaid by the doctors' groups.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | October 8, 1991
Josephine Rollette walked slowly to the podium. "It's very devastating," she said. "I really don't know what to do."Four months ago, her 13-year-old granddaughter, Tezara Horsey, was accidentally shot and killed at a friend's East Baltimore house. Police said the boy who pulled the trigger told them he didn't know the .22-caliber revolver was loaded.After Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday announced a campaign promoting handgun safety, the 63-year-old grandmother quietly thanked city officials and doctors at a news conference at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
A soldier who lost all of his limbs in the Iraq War received double arm transplants at Johns Hopkins Hospital last month in a rare procedure that has already begun to restore some normalcy to his life. Hopkins doctors are to speak in detail about the rare procedure performed on 26-year-old Brendan Marrocco in a press briefing today. The Army infantryman lost his arms and legs in a roadside bomb attack in 2009 becoming the first soldier of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to lose all four limbs in combat and survive.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 11, 2013
Administration UMBC's Brown wins Under Armour AD of the Year Award UMBC athletic director Charles Brown has been named a Division I-AAA Under Armour Athletics Director of the Year Award recipient by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Brown will be honored at the NACDA and Affiliates Convention Week on June 15 at the World Center Marriott Resort in Orlando, Fla. The Under Armour AD of the Year Award was created to honor intercollegiate athletics directors for their commitment and administrative excellence within a campus or college community environment.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Sitting in the doctor's office in August, elated to learn she was pregnant for the first time, Amanda Weeks had a question. Could she still compete in the half-marathon at the Baltimore Running Festival? "I've raced all 10 years (of the event)," said Weeks, 33, of Ellicott City. "I want to keep the tradition going. " Told she could run, Weeks relaxed. "Running is my stress reliever," she said. "To take it away, especially now, would be tough. " Weeks will be nearly five months pregnant when she answers the gun Saturday for the 13.1-mile race through the streets of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1995
Precisely at 8 a.m. every Friday, Hopkins doctors in starched white coats converge on a small, oak-paneled amphitheater, finding seats on the long wooden benches to take part in a medical tradition that began a century ago.Interns and residents peer over the balconies. World-renowned specialists are sitting in the audience of more than 200 doctors. A huge portrait of Dr. Henry Mills Hurd, superintendent when Johns Hopkins Hospital opened in 1889, stares out over the steep rows. Latecomers stand in the back, craning their necks to see.With the words, "May I have the first slide, please?"
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Authorities have concluded the investigation into the Johns Hopkins gynecologist suspected of recording patients during exams and determined that no one will face criminal charges, according to court records. Dr. Nikita Levy committed suicide in February 2013, amid an investigation into cameras and hard drives that police have said they believe he was using to record patients. Though his death pre-empted any prosecution of Levy, police launched an investigation to learn whether there were co-conspirators.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a rare tumor that contained several fully grown teeth from a baby boy's brain. The tumor was found in the then-4-month-old from West Virginia in 2012 after a pediatrician noticed that his head was unusually large for his age. Doctors wrote about the findings in an article that appeared this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The discovery could someday help researchers trying to cure diseases or grow new organs, medical experts said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Elizabeth Klein is used to the spotlight, but there was something the budding actress from Bethesda didn't want everyone to see. That was a telltale mark on her throat from thyroid surgery. "I don't want every character I play to have the same scar," said Klein, who had a thyroidectomy on Jan. 10. "It's a very obvious scar. " But Klein doesn't have a scar, at least not a visible one, anymore. Her doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have recently begun offering a "facelift" style procedure that hides evidence of surgery behind her ear and under her hair.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
President Barack Obama signed into law Thursday legislation that would allow HIV-infected people to donate their organs to other HIV-infected people for research aimed at eventually making such transplants routine. The HIV Organ Policy Equity, or HOPE, Act lifted a ban on any HIV-infected organ transplants. That ban dated from 1984, when the disease was new, not fully understood and virtually always a death sentence. No other disease, including cancer, universally put an organ off limits.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Johns Hopkins Medicine announced Friday that it is temporarily halting its practice of giving second opinions in possible "black lung" cases, after ABC News reported that Hopkins doctors usually side with the coal mining companies paying for the service. In thousands of cases, X-ray readers at Hopkins have "almost unwaveringly" sided with the companies seeking to defeat the claims of coal miners seeking benefits, according to the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit investigative reporting outlet that teamed with ABC on the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore sun | October 11, 2013
Apparently quoting Vladimir Lenin to explain the deeper meaning of Obamacare, and stopping just short of calling President Barack Obama a communist, isn't inflammatory enough for Ben Carson in his new role as a paid Fox News contributor. After leveling the Joe-McCarthy-like charges against Obama on Megyn Kelly's show earlier this week, here's Carson raising his game and introducing "slavery" into the already fevered debate over the Affordable Care Act. I wonder how Johns Hopkins is feeling now about that "emeritus" title they gave Carson when he resigned in July.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals overturned a multimillion-dollar judgment against Johns Hopkins Hospital in a case that accused its doctors of causing severe and irreversible brain damage to a baby born at the hospital. The judges ordered the case sent back to a lower court for retrial. They ruled that Hopkins should have been allowed to give more testimony about the role a midwife might have played in the baby's injuries. Attorneys for the baby's family said Wednesday that they will appeal the decision to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 6, 2012
Drop a few pounds and it will lead to a good night's sleep, new Johns Hopkins research has found. As the body loses fat, particularly belly fat, people are able to sleep better, Hopkins doctors found when following 77 people over six months. The improvement in sleep quality was experienced by both those who lost weight through diet as well as those who combined a healthy diet with exercise. Study participants had type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes and were all overweight or obese.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Ben Carson wasted no time in his first appearance as an official, on-the-payroll contributor to Fox Wednesday night quoting Vladimir Lenin and Saul Alinsky in his first 50 seconds on air to show what he believes the president is really up to with Obamacare. Carson, who earlier in the day had been announced as a new contributor to Fox, was on Megyn Kelly's primetime show, "The Kelly File," presumably to talk about a hearing into charges that the I.R.S. had targeted opponents of President Obama.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
U.S. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler was on to her third set of doctors when she visited the Johns Hopkins Hospital, having been told the fetus she was carrying was developing without kidneys and would be unable to breathe on its own after birth. But in Baltimore, her doctors stumbled into what is considered an unproven treatment for a condition known as Potter's Sequence, the diagnosis her fetus was given, involving low levels of amniotic fluid. Herrera Beutler underwent a series of injections of saline solution into her uterus at Hopkins to raise the fluid levels, key for normal fetal development.
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